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Carole E. Newlands

Bio: Carole E. Newlands is an academic researcher from University of Wisconsin-Madison. The author has contributed to research in topics: Poetry & Poetics. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 34 publications receiving 511 citations. Previous affiliations of Carole E. Newlands include Cornell University & University of California, Los Angeles.
Topics: Poetry, Poetics, Cicero, Lament, Debt

Papers
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MonographDOI
TL;DR: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81-96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81–96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms. As poems of praise, they delight in poetic excess whether they honour the emperor or the poet's friends. Yet extravagant speech is also capacious speech. It functions as a strategy for conveying the wealth and grandeur of villas, statues and precious works of art as well as the complex emotions aroused by the material and political culture of empire. The Silvae are the product of a divided, self-fashioning voice. Statius was born in Naples of non-aristocratic parents. His position as outsider to the culture he celebrates gives him a unique perspective on it. The Silvae are poems of anxiety as well as praise, expressive of the tensions within the later period of Domitian's reign.

127 citations

Book
01 Nov 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, Augusto states that to be anti-Augustan is to pay the price of having to read the texts with the eyes of a delator or a mole, while the Augustans' are favoured with a smile and the best seats at an entertainment which, without their knowing it, includes them 'in the scenic action of the poetic language'.
Abstract: fine unificante e totalizzante' (ibid.). Through his definitive actions Augusto si definisce non solo come un Primo ma anche come un Ultimo Uomo, definitivo, per Roma' (p. 278). To be 'anti-Augustan' is to pay the price of having to read the texts with the eyes of a delator or a mole, while the Augustans' are favoured with a smile and the best seats at an entertainment which, without their knowing it, includes them 'in the scenic action of the poetic language'. Thirty pages of end-notes, eight pages of bibliography, and indexes of subjects and of passages cited, enhance the value of this important book.

89 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the preface to each book of his collected poems, the Silvae, Statius writes in the apologetic mode as discussed by the authors, and he claims that his poems are mere impromptu productions, qui mini subito calore et quadam festinandi voluptate fluxerunt.
Abstract: In the preface to each book of his collected poems, the Silvae , Statius writes in the apologetic mode. Addressing his friend Arruntius Stella in the preface to Book 1, he claims that his poems are mere impromptu productions, ‘qui mini subito calore et quadam festinandi voluptate fluxerunt’, and he worries that by the time they reach publication they may have lost their only charm, that of speed, ‘celeritas’. Statius makes the same claims for impromptu production with the poem I will be discussing in this article, Silvae 3.1, which celebrates the remodelling of the temple of Hercules on the private Campanian estate that belonged to Statius' friend Pollius Felix: ‘nam primum limen eius Hercules Surrentinus aperit, quern in litore tuo consecratum, statim ut videram, his versibus adoravi’ (praef. 3).

35 citations

BookDOI
13 Mar 2015
TL;DR: The Brill's Companion to Statius as discussed by the authors provides a comprehensive overview of recent approaches to statius, discuss the fundamental issues and themes of his poetry, and suggest new fruitful areas for research.
Abstract: Email: marketing@brill.com Brill’s Companion to Statius is the first companion volume to be published on arguably the most important Roman poet of the Flavian period. Thirty-four newly commissioned chapters from international experts provide a comprehensive overview of recent approaches to Statius, discuss the fundamental issues and themes of his poetry, and suggest new fruitful areas for research. All of his works are considered: the Thebaid, his longest extant epic; the Achilleid, his unfinished epic; and the Silvae, his collected short poetry. Particular themes explored include the social, cultural, and political issues surrounding his poetry; his controversial aesthetic; the influence of his predecessors upon his poetry; and the scholarly and literary reception of his poetry in subsequent ages to the present.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The third book of the Tristia as mentioned in this paper is the first to have been written in Tomis, Ovid's place of exile, and it is the only book where Ovid is allowed to write the elegy of lament.
Abstract: The third book of the Tristia is the first to have been written in Tomis, Ovid's place of exile. The long journey from Rome, the subject of the first book of the Tristia, is over. The distractions of the journey can no longer sustain him, and his only pleasure is to weep, in other words to write the elegy of lament: dum tamen et uentis dubius iactabar et undis,fallebat curas aegraque corda labor:ut uia finita est, et opus requieuit eundi,et poenae tellus est mini tacta meae,nil nisi flere libet…(Tr. 3.2.15-19)But while in turmoil I was being tossed around by winds and waves, my worries and sad heart were distracted by the battle for survival. Now that the journey is over, the effort involved in travel is spent, and the land of my punishment has been reached, weeping is my only pleasure.

32 citations


Cited by
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MonographDOI
TL;DR: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81-96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81–96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms. As poems of praise, they delight in poetic excess whether they honour the emperor or the poet's friends. Yet extravagant speech is also capacious speech. It functions as a strategy for conveying the wealth and grandeur of villas, statues and precious works of art as well as the complex emotions aroused by the material and political culture of empire. The Silvae are the product of a divided, self-fashioning voice. Statius was born in Naples of non-aristocratic parents. His position as outsider to the culture he celebrates gives him a unique perspective on it. The Silvae are poems of anxiety as well as praise, expressive of the tensions within the later period of Domitian's reign.

127 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, sexual virtue on display: the cults of pudicitia and honours for women, traditional narratives and Livy's Roman history, and Valerius Maximus: the complexities of past as paradigm.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Sexual virtue on display: the cults of pudicitia and honours for women 2. Traditional narratives and Livy's Roman history 3. Valerius Maximus: the complexities of past as paradigm 4. Subversive genres: testing the limits of pudicitia 5. Declamation: what part of 'no' do you understand? 6. Sexual virtue on display II: oratory and the speeches of Cicero 7. Imperial narrative, imperial interventions.

123 citations

Reference BookDOI
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a method to solve the problem of "uniformity" in the following manner, i.i.p.a.1-1.
Abstract: ion 326

109 citations

Book
27 Jun 2019
TL;DR: This paper reinterpreted Quintilian's Institutio oratoria through the eyes of one of his sharpest readers, and radically reassessed the Epistles as a work of minute textual artistry, and made a major intervention in scholarly debates on intertextuality, imitation and rhetorical culture at Rome.
Abstract: Imitation was central to Roman culture, and a staple of Latin poetry. But it was also fundamental to prose. This book brings together two monuments of the High Empire, Quintilian's Institutio oratoria ('Training of the orator') and Pliny's Epistles, to reveal a spectacular project of textual and ethical imitation. As a young man Pliny had studied with Quintilian. In the Epistles he meticulously transforms and subsumes his teacher's masterpiece, together with poetry and prose ranging from Homer to Tacitus' Dialogus de oratoribus. In teasing apart Pliny's rich intertextual weave, this book reinterprets Quintilian through the eyes of one of his sharpest readers, radically reassesses the Epistles as a work of minute textual artistry, and makes a major intervention in scholarly debates on intertextuality, imitation and rhetorical culture at Rome. The result is a landmark study with far-reaching implications for how we read Latin literature.

77 citations