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Carvallo Mauricio

Bio: Carvallo Mauricio is an academic researcher from University of Oklahoma. The author has contributed to research in topics: Implicit self-esteem & Cytomegalovirus. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 6 citations.

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TL;DR: This article found that men disproportionately worked in 11 traditionally male occupations whose titles matched their surnames (e.g., baker, carpenter, farmer), and showed that people disproportionately married others who shared their birthday numbers.
Abstract: Implicit egotism is an unconscious preference for things resembling the self. Four studies provided unprecedented evidence for implicit egotism. Study 1 used census data to show that men disproportionately worked in 11 traditionally male occupations whose titles matched their surnames (e.g., baker, carpenter, farmer). Study 2 used statewide marriage records to show that people disproportionately married others who shared their birthday numbers. Study 3 showed that men named Cal and Tex disproportionately moved to states resembling their names. Study 4 showed how it is possible to reverse implicit egotism in naming preferences. All four studies controlled for important confounds (e.g., gender, ethnicity, education), identified theoretically predictable moderators (e.g., implicit self-esteem, social status), or both. Future research should focus on other theoretically derived moderators of implicit egotism.

10 citations

TL;DR: It is recommended that in RTR post-COVID-19, the immunosuppression regimen should be gradually reinstated along with strict vigilance in observing for highly prevalent coinfections (TB, HP, and CMV).
Abstract: virus (RSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonitis, and histoplasmosis (HP). Management was initiated with antituberculosis medications, ganciclovir, antibiotics, and liposomal amphotericin B, and the immunosuppressants were suspended, yet the patient ’ s evolution was catastrophic and the outcome fatal. Conclusion . We recommend that in RTR post-COVID-19, the immunosuppression regimen should be gradually reinstated along with strict vigilance in observing for highly prevalent coinfections (TB, HP, and CMV).
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is recommended that in RTR post-COVID-19, the immunosuppression regimen should be gradually reinstated along with strict vigilance in observing for highly prevalent coinfections (TB, HP, and CMV).
Abstract: Introduction Infection with SARS-CoV-2 increases the risk of acute graft dysfunction (AGD) in renal transplant recipients (RTR), and the risk of concurrently presenting with opportunistic infections is also increased. There is no current consensus on the management of immunosuppression during SARS-CoV-2 infection in RTR. Case Presentation. A 35-year-old male RTR from a living related donor presented with SARS-CoV-2 infection (January 2021). Two months later, despite alterations to his immunosuppression regimen (tacrolimus (TAC) was reduced by 50%, and the mycophenolic acid (MMF) was suspended with the remission of symptoms), the patient presented with pulmonary tuberculosis, pneumonia due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonitis, and histoplasmosis (HP). Management was initiated with antituberculosis medications, ganciclovir, antibiotics, and liposomal amphotericin B, and the immunosuppressants were suspended, yet the patient's evolution was catastrophic and the outcome fatal. Conclusion We recommend that in RTR post-COVID-19, the immunosuppression regimen should be gradually reinstated along with strict vigilance in observing for highly prevalent coinfections (TB, HP, and CMV).

Cited by
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TL;DR: The red harvester ant is a child of the Enlightenment, paying homage to Bacon and Newton but most of all to Condorcet, who trod the same intellectual path (and who came to grief in the Revolution for reasons probably not unrelated to his philosophy).
Abstract: When the red harvester ant is threatened, nestmates rush to its assistance. The message is a chemical one. Distress is communicated and help summoned by the potential victim ejecting a tiny cocktail of alkanes and terpenoids. Professor E 0 Wilson, who made this discovery, is a distinguished zoologist whose writings have twice been awarded Pulitzer Prizes. His interests extend far beyond entomology, however. Why should human communication be qualitatively different from that of the ant, in being achieved by definable, physicochemical processes? And, if this is the case, surely the same must be true of other social phenomena? Having conceded so much, on what grounds can we exclude other products of human activity such as the social sciences, arts, humanities and ethics? In a mechanistic universe, the whole of human civilization is the ultimate product of the interaction between genes and environment, incredibly complex, as Wilson admits, but susceptible to fundamentally the same analytic techniques as communication in the harvester ant. Consilience (literally, a 'jumping together') is the notion that a common groundwork of explanation applies not only to the sciences but also to the arts, ethics and religion. In his book Consiliencel Wilson applies a combination of broad learning and a style of baroque exuberance to put the case for such a unity of knowledge. Wilson is thus, as he makes clear, a child of the Enlightenment, paying homage to Bacon and Newton but most of all to Condorcet, who trod the same intellectual path (and who came to grief in the Revolution for reasons probably not unrelated to his philosophy). He mourns the triumph at the end of the eighteenth century of revelatory religion fearful of the outcomes of science, and most of all of Romanticism although regrettably overlooking the

829 citations

Posted Content
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The authors found that low income respondents and African Americans were more likely than others to support limitations on the rights of citizens and media representatives to criticize the government, and low income Latinos are more likely to trust in U.S. government officials and to believe that "the government is run for the benefit of all" than were high income Latinos.
Abstract: According to system justification theory, people are motivated to preserve the belief that existing social arrangements are fair, legitimate, and justifiable (Jost & Banaji, 1994). The strongest form of this hypothesis, which draws on the logic of cognitive dissonance theory, holds that people who are most disadvantaged by the status quo would have the greatest psychological need to reduce ideological dissonance and would therefore be most likely to support, defend, and justify existing social systems, authorities, and outcomes. Variations on this hypothesis were tested in four U.S. national survey studies. We found that: (a) low income respondents and African Americans were more likely than others to support limitations on the rights of citizens and media representatives to criticize the government (b) low income Latinos were more likely to trust in U.S. government officials and to believe that "the government is run for the benefit of all" than were high income Latinos, (c) Southerners in the U.S. were more likely to endorse meritocratic belief systems than were Northerners and poor and Southern African Americans were more likely to subscribe to meritocratic ideologies than were African Americans who were more affluent and from the North, (d) low income respondents and African Americans were more likely than others to believe that economic inequality is legitimate and necessary, and (e) stronger endorsement of meritocratic ideology was associated with greater satisfaction with one's own economic situation. Taken together, these findings provide support for the dissonance-based argument that people who suffer the most from a given state of affairs are paradoxically the least likely to question, challenge, reject, or change it. Implications for theories of system justification, cognitive dissonance, and social change are also discussed.

520 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This paper found that a disproportionate share of people choose spouses, places to live, and occupations with names similar to their own, which are interpreted as evidence of implicit ego-motivation.
Abstract: Three articles published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology have shown that a disproportionate share of people choose spouses, places to live, and occupations with names similar to their own. These findings, interpreted as evidence of implicit egotism, are included in most modern social psychology textbooks and many university courses. The current article successfully replicates the original findings but shows that they are most likely caused by a combination of cohort, geographic, and ethnic confounds as well as reverse causality.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that uniting people with shared names is an effective individual-level approach to email personalization and discusses how using a person’s name in marketing communications may capture attention and bridge social distance.
Abstract: Email field experiment varying whether potential donor has matching surname to in-need teacher and quantifying effectiveness of less-exact matches.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A type of similarity based on two people sharing the same material item is examined and it is found that this type of sharing causes gift recipients to like their gifts more, and feel closer to gift givers.
Abstract: We investigated a type of mere similarity that describes owning the same item as someone else. Moreover, we examined this mere similarity in a gift-giving context, whereby givers gift something that they also buy for themselves (a behavior we call “companionizing”). Using a Heiderian account of balancing unit-sentiment relations, we tested whether gift recipients like gifts more when gifts are companionized. Akin to mere ownership, which describes people liking their possessions more merely because they own them, we tested a complementary prediction: whether people like their possessions more merely because others own them too. Thus, in a departure from previous work, we examined a type of similarity based on two people sharing the same material item. We find that this type of sharing causes gift recipients to like their gifts more, and feel closer to gift givers.

22 citations