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Ceil Lucas

Bio: Ceil Lucas is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Manually coded language & Sign language. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 51 citations.

Papers
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BookDOI
01 Jan 2001

63 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the history of deaf communities and show that the current issues have roots in the past, including the central role of education in the creation and maintenance of communities.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract Because of their deafness, deaf people have been marked as different and treated problematically by their hearing societies. Until 25 years ago, academic literature addressing deafness typically described deafness as pathology, focusing on cures or mitigation of the perceived handicap. In ethnographic accounts, interactions involving deaf people are sometimes presented as examples of how communities treat atypical members. Recently, studies of deafness have adopted more complex sociocultural perspectives, raising issues of community identity, formation and maintenance, and language ideology. Anthropological researchers have approached the study of d/Deaf communities from at least three useful angles. The first, focusing on the history of these communities, demonstrates that the current issues have roots in the past, including the central role of education in the creation and maintenance of communities. A second approach centers on emic perspectives, drawing on the voices of community members th...

161 citations

Book
21 Nov 2019
TL;DR: Sign language phonology is the abstract grammatical component where primitive structural units are combined to create an infinite number of meaningful utterances, and this comparison allows us to better understand how the modality of a language influences its phonological system.
Abstract: A concise overview of key findings and ideas in sign language phonology and its contributions to related fields, including historical linguistics, morphology, prosody, language acquisition and language creation. Working on sign languages not only provides important new insights on familiar issues, but also poses a whole new set of questions about phonology, because of the use of the visual communication modality. This book lays out the properties needed to recognize a phonological system regardless of its modality. Written by a leading expert in sign language research, the book describes the current state of the field and addresses a range of issues that students and researchers will encounter in their work, as well as highlighting the significant impact that the study of sign languages has had on the field of phonology as a whole. It includes lists of further reading materials, and a full glossary, as well as helpful illustrations that demonstrate the important aspects of sign language structure, even to the most unfamiliar of readers. A text that will be useful to both specialists and general linguists, this book provides the first comprehension overview of the field.

95 citations

Book ChapterDOI
12 Jul 2013

91 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
23 Apr 2014-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: The authors investigated lexical variation in BSL numeral signs and found that younger signers were using a decreasing variety of regionally distinct variants, suggesting that levelling may be taking place.
Abstract: This paper presents results from a corpus-based study investigating lexical variation in BSL. An earlier study investigating variation in BSL numeral signs found that younger signers were using a decreasing variety of regionally distinct variants, suggesting that levelling may be taking place. Here, we report findings from a larger investigation looking at regional lexical variants for colours, countries, numbers and UK placenames elicited as part of the BSL Corpus Project. Age, school location and language background were significant predictors of lexical variation, with younger signers using a more levelled variety. This change appears to be happening faster in particular sub-groups of the deaf community (e.g., signers from hearing families). Also, we find that for the names of some UK cities, signers from outside the region use a different sign than those who live in the region.

83 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider variation in a class of signs in Australian and New Zealand Sign Languages that includes the signs think, name, and clever, and find that some of the particular factors at work, and the kinds of influence they have, appear to differ in these three signed languages.
Abstract: In this study, we consider variation in a class of signs in Australian and New Zealand Sign Languages that includes the signs think, name, and clever. In their citation form, these signs are specified for a place of articulation at or near the signer's forehead or above, but are sometimes produced at lower locations. An analysis of 2667 tokens collected from 205 deaf signers in five sites across Australia and of 2096 tokens collected from 138 deaf signers from three regions in New Zealand indicates that location variation in these signs reflects both linguistic and social factors, as also reported for American Sign Language (Lucas, Bayley, & Valli, 2001). Despite similarities, however, we find that some of the particular factors at work, and the kinds of influence they have, appear to differ in these three signed languages. Moreover, our results suggest that lexical frequency may also play a role.

82 citations