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Chacha J. Mwita

Bio: Chacha J. Mwita is an academic researcher from University of Dar es Salaam. The author has contributed to research in topics: Clarias gariepinus & Bay. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 20 publications receiving 155 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that parasite communities in clariid fishes of Lake Victoria are structured by ecological factors, namely the intermixing of the waters in the lake and the predominant and mobile C. gariepinus.
Abstract: The factors that determine parasite assemblages among the clariid fishes of Lake Victoria, Tanzania were studied between August 2003 and February 2005. Six hundred and fifty-six fish belonging to seven species were necropsied and examined for parasites, from which 31 species of metazoan parasites were recorded. The community was dominated by the nematodes both in species and numbers. Most species were generalists with only two trematodes, Diplostomum mashonense and Tylodelphys species, being specialists of Clarias gariepinus. Ten species were considered core and predictable. Parasite species richness, number of individuals per host and Shannon-Wiener diversity indices were generally high. At the compound community level, a mean number of 7.8 parasites were shared among different species of fish and the maximum number of parasites species per fish at the infracommunity level was seven. Levels of similarity in parasite species richness at the component community level ranged from 29.6 to 61.5%. The study concludes that parasite communities in clariid fishes of Lake Victoria are structured by ecological factors. At the infracommunity level, host size, diet and vagility promoted a richer parasite community. At the compound level, two factors were crucial, namely the intermixing of the waters in the lake and the predominant and mobile C. gariepinus.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Natural Environment Research Council, Grant/Award Number: NE/L002485/1; Genetics Society Heredity Fieldwork Grant; Systematics Research Fund; Fisheries Society of the British Isle Small Research Grant; Percy Sladen Memorial Trust Fund; NERC Bimolecular Analysis Facility Sheffield; European Research Council; Swiss National Science Foundation

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that clariid parasites are monophyletic at higher taxonomic levels (Cestodea, NematodeA, Digenea and Crustacea) but the position of two trematodes and a nematode were not stable.
Abstract: Phylogenetic relationships among twenty two metazoan parasites recovered from seven species of clariid fish from Lake Victoria were analysed using partial 18S rDNA sequences The 18S rDNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, directly sequenced, aligned and phylogenies inferred using maximum parsimony Heuristic bootstrap MP searches yielded one most parsimonious tree (CI = 61%, HI = 39%), which showed that clariid parasites are monophyletic at higher taxonomic levels (Cestodea, Nematodea, Digenea and Crustacea) However the position of two trematodes (Allocredium mazoensis and Clinostomum sp) and a nematode (Contracaecum sp) were not stable Despite the present findings, the study utilised single species from each taxa, hence further analysis with additional sequences from a multitude of species is recommended to further resolve the phylogeny of the parasites of the clariids in Lake Victoria and elsewhere

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Seventeen species of parasites were recovered from 1071 Clarias gariepinus examined from the Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria, Tanzania, and ten were identified to species, six to genus and one to family level.
Abstract: Seventeen species of parasites were recovered from 1071 Clarias gariepinus examined from the Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria. The parasite fauna comprised of four ectoparasites, a Monogenea, Hirudinea, crustacean and a Digenea; and fourteen endoparasites, five nematodes, five trematodes and three cestodes. Twelve parasite species were adults and five were larval forms. Ten were identified to species, six to genus and one to family level. Many species recorded are common to C. gariepinus , a few, e.g. Tylodelphys species is a first record in fish of Africa, thus represents a new host record. Spinitectus petterae is reported for the first time in Tanzania, as such represents a new geographical citing. The proteocephalid cestode is also a new record in this host in Tanzania. Tanzania Journal of Science Vol.30(1) 2004: 53-62

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The study concluded that all four commercial species collected from Mwanza Gulf are good for human health, but R. argentea is the best for consumption because it contains higher levels of ω3 FAs, mainly EPA.
Abstract: Fatty acids (FAs) particularly ω3 and ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play important role in human health. This study aimed to investigate the composition and levels of selected ω3 PUFAs in four commercial fish species, Nile perch (Lates niloticus), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), Tilapia zillii, and dagaa (Rastrineobola argentea) from Mwanza Gulf in Lake Victoria. The results indicated that 36 types of FAs with different saturation levels were detected. These FAs were dominated by docosahexaenoic (DHA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosapentaenoic (DPA), and eicosatetraenoic acids. O. niloticus had the highest composition of FAs (34) compared to L. niloticus (27), T. zillii (26), and R. argentea (21). The levels of EPA differed significantly among the four commercial fish species . The highest EPA levels were found in R. argentea followed by L. niloticus and O. niloticus and the lowest in T. zillii. The DPA levels showed no significant difference among the four fish species studied . The study concluded that all four commercial species collected from Mwanza Gulf are good for human health, but R. argentea is the best for consumption because it contains higher levels of ω3 FAs, mainly EPA.

16 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: Tanzanian GDP growth rate of 6.3 percent in 2004 was well above the rate achieved in South Africa (3.7 percent) and achieved the best annual growth rate in the world.
Abstract: Since the 1990s, the per capita GDP in Tanzania has been increasing and Tanzania’s growth trend has been impressive. The annual GDP growth has averaged 6.4 percent between 2000 and 2004 and exceeded seven percent in 2002 and 2003 (Figure 2, Real GDP Growth). Tanzania’s growth rate of 6.3 percent in 2004 was well above the rate achieved in South Africa (3.7 percent). This strong growth performance reflects the fruits of responsible monetary and fiscal policy, concerted reforms, rapid export growth, and significant debt relief.

263 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
23 May 1989-Copeia
TL;DR: A systematic revision of the African species of the genus Clarias (Pisces;Clariidae) is presented.
Abstract: A systematic revision of the African species of the genus Clarias (Pisces;Clariidae) , A systematic revision of the African species of the genus Clarias (Pisces;Clariidae) , مرکز فناوری اطلاعات و اطلاع رسانی کشاورزی

221 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that the MiFish eDNA metabarcoding method is useful for ecosystem conservation strategies and the sustainable use of fishery resources in “ecosystem-based fishery management” through continuous biodiversity monitoring at multiple sites.
Abstract: We reviewed the current methodology and practices of the DNA metabarcoding approach using a universal PCR primer pair MiFish, which co-amplifies a short fragment of fish DNA (approx. 170 bp from the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene) across a wide variety of taxa. This method has mostly been applied to biodiversity monitoring using environmental DNA (eDNA) shed from fish and, coupled with next-generation sequencing technologies, has enabled massively parallel sequencing of several hundred eDNA samples simultaneously. Since the publication of its technical outline in 2015, this method has been widely used in various aquatic environments in and around the six continents, and MiFish primers have demonstrably outperformed other competing primers. Here, we outline the technical progress in this method over the last 5 years and highlight some case studies on marine, freshwater, and estuarine fish communities. Additionally, we discuss various applications of MiFish metabarcoding to non-fish organisms, single-species detection systems, quantitative biodiversity monitoring, and bulk DNA samples other than eDNA. By recognizing the MiFish eDNA metabarcoding strengths and limitations, we argue that this method is useful for ecosystem conservation strategies and the sustainable use of fishery resources in “ecosystem-based fishery management” through continuous biodiversity monitoring at multiple sites.

94 citations