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Char Miller

Bio: Char Miller is an academic researcher from Pomona College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Environmental history & Forest management. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 65 publications receiving 369 citations. Previous affiliations of Char Miller include Northeastern University & Colorado State University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Out of the Woods journal as discussed by the authors provides a broad array of topics and reflecting the continuing diversity within the field of environmental history, and is intended as a reader for course use.
Abstract: Covering a broad array of topics and reflecting the continuing diversity within the field of environmental history, Out of the Woods begins with three theoretical pieces by William Cronon, Carolyn Merchant, and Donald Worster probing the assumptions that underlie the words and ideas historians use to analyze human interaction with the physical world. One of these - the concept of place - is the subject of a second group of essays. The political context is picked up in the third section, followed by a selection of some of the journal's most recent contributions discussing the intersection between urban and environmental history. Water's role in defining the contours of the human and natural landscape in undeniable and forms the focus of the fifth section. Finally, the global character of environmental issues emerges in three compelling articles by Alfred Crosby, Thomas Dunlap, and Stephen Pyne. Of interest to a wide range of scholars in environmental history, law, and politics, Out of the Woods is intended as a reader for course use and a benchmark for the field of environmental history as it continues to develop into the next century.

31 citations

Book
24 Oct 1997
TL;DR: The authors examines the history of forestry in the United States, exploring the impact of the discipline on natural and human landscapes since the mid-nineteenth century, and highlights the intersection of the political, social, and environmental forces that have determined the use and abuse of American forests.
Abstract: Endangered ecosystem or renewable resource? How we feel about forests has to do with more than trees. This interdisciplinary collection of essays examines the history of forestry in the United States, exploring the impact of the discipline on natural and human landscapes since the mid-nineteenth century. Through important articles that have helped define the field, it assesses the development of the forestry profession and the U.S. Forest Service, analyzes the political and scientific controversies that have marked forestry's evolution, and discloses the transformations in America's commitment to its forested estate. American Forests highlights the intersection of the political, social, and environmental forces that have determined the use and abuse of American forests. It examines changes both in the assumptions that have defined forest management and in the scientific approach to and political justification for timber harvesting in our national forests. It sheds light on the ongoing debate between utilization and conservation, addressing arguments from environmentalists, the timber industry, sportsmen, and politicians while exploring the interaction between public opinion and public policy. It provides sharp insights into the most important players in the politics of forestry, from George Perkins Marsh and Berhard Fernow to Gifford Pinchot and Teddy Roosevelt. And it addresses issues as wide-ranging as budgeting, clearcutting, and the regulation of livestock grazing on national forest lands. This multifaceted volume draws on the insights of scholars in conservation and ecology, economics, history, law, and political science to make a definitive contribution to the study and practice of forestry. By both clarifying and extending recent debate about the political purpose, scientific character, and environmental rationales of forestry in America, it will help define the place of forests in our future."

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) identified the loss of open space as a core threat to the health of national forests and identified the need to consider the larger landscape when making decisions as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) identified the loss of open space as a core threat to the health of national forests. Widely acknowledged are the ecological interconnections between public and private lands. But there is also an important historical and political relationship between national forest management and private land development. There is ample historical precedent for the USFS to consider what is happening outside its jurisdiction and respond accordingly on national forests. We expect national forests to become more politically contested in the future, as a result of the fragmentation taking place on private lands. If the agency fails to consider the larger landscape when making decisions, we also expect a growing number of interests to challenge it politically and legally. There are several policy tools and strategies that can be used to deal with the private land development problem, and we focus on some that have received less attention.

16 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors develop an integrative perspective on catch-and-release (C&R) by drawing on historical, philosophical, socio-psychological, biological, and managerial insights and perspectives.
Abstract: Most research on catch-and-release (C&R) in recreational fishing has been conducted from a disciplinary angle focusing on the biological sciences and the study of hooking mortality after release. This hampers understanding of the complex and multifaceted nature of C&R. In the present synopsis, we develop an integrative perspective on C&R by drawing on historical, philosophical, socio-psychological, biological, and managerial insights and perspectives. Such a perspective is helpful for a variety of reasons, such as 1) improving the science supporting successful fisheries management and conservation, 2) facilitating dialogue between managers, anglers, and other stakeholders, 3) minimizing conflict potentials, and 4) paving the path toward sustainable recreational fisheries management. The present work highlights the array of cultural, institutional, psychological, and biological factors and dimensions involved in C&R. Progress toward successful treatment of C&R might be enhanced by acknowledging the complex...

594 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors hypothesize that environmental values derive from a sense of connectivity with nature, which describes a perception of sameness between the self, others, and the natural world.
Abstract: The authors hypothesize that environmental values derive from a sense of connectivity with nature. Connectivity describes a perception of sameness between the self, others, and the natural world. T...

423 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review examines the state of conflict and cooperation over transboundary water resources from an environmental, political, and human development perspective and provides evidence on the potential costs of noncooperation or even conflict over water resources.
Abstract: This review examines the state of conflict and cooperation over transboundary water resources from an environmental, political, and human development perspective. Although the potential for outright war between countries over water is low, cooperation is often missing in disputes over transboundary resources. This background chapter will ▪ Provide a brief overview of the nature of conflict and experiences of cooperation over transboundary resources. ▪ Provide a conceptual basis for understanding cooperation and the costs of noncooperation over water. ▪ Indicate the possible triggers for conflict over water sharing and the implications on the livelihoods of ordinary communities. ▪ Offer evidence on the potential costs of noncooperation or even conflict over water resources. ▪ Analyze power asymmetries between riparian states and how they affect the outcomes of negotiations. ▪ Analyze different examples of cases that countries have used to manage the competition for water resources. ▪ Propose general princi...

357 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that variability in arid and semi-arid grazing systems is not the outcome of qualitatively different dynamical behaviour, and that livestock do cause negative change through normal density-dependent relations.
Abstract: A debate in ecology rages over the sources and types of dynamic behaviour driving ecological systems. Drylands have become a particular focus of this debate. In these environments extreme and unpredictable variability in rainfall are considered to confer non-equilibrium dynamics by continually disrupting the tight consumer–resource relations otherwise considered to pull a system towards equilibrium. This implies that livestock grazing in drylands, widely thought to cause degradation and desertification through bad management practices leading to overstocking, might not be causing irreversible ecological change through over-use of vegetation. An article recently published in Ecological Applications (Illius & O’Connor, 1999), however, argues that variability in arid and semi-arid grazing systems is not the outcome of qualitatively different dynamical behaviour, and that livestock do cause negative change through normal density-dependent relations. The authors maintain that these operate primarily in key resource areas and during drought periods. We contest these arguments on several grounds: that key terms are poorly applied in ways which suggest inconsistencies in the internal logic of the arguments; that the paper is unjustifiably selective in the choice and interpretation of evidence on which it builds; and that the authors do not engage critically with the crucial policy implications of the debate, particularly as they relate to pastoral landuse by African herders in areas under communal tenure and management. We do not suggest that degradation never occurs in arid and semi-arid rangelands, but that Illius and O’Connor’s analysis of the mechanisms via which this might take place is misleading and at times, we feel, theoretically bizarre. In particular, we suggest that drought periods may be the times when density-dependent mechanisms are least likely to occur and that key resource areas exist because of ungrazeable reserves which effectively cannot be degraded, although subject to heavy grazing. We also attempt to draw out the theoretical implications of attributing change caused by biotic–abiotic effects to biotic–biotic interactions. We contend that non-equilibrium concepts remain crucial for both natural and social science approaches to understanding dryland environments and their multiple, dynamic uses by pastoralists. Illius and O’Connor’s critique of non-equilibrium concepts as a means for understanding ecosystem behaviour in African drylands seeks to address a deepening conceptual fault line separating factions of the rangeland science and livestock development community. Epitomizing one side of this divide are understandings of semi-arid and arid environments in terms of relationships between their biotic components, emphasizing the potential for grazing by domestic livestock to perturb the system from a knowable and desirable climax community at equilibrium. On the other, is an emerging idea of such environments as continually driven, or disturbed , by abiotic factors, primarily rainfall, such that systemic effects of herbivory are relatively unimportant. The two approaches have been termed equilibrium and non-equilibrium , respectively. The debate is significant for ecological theory because viewing arid and semi-arid environments through these two lenses can influence what, and how, questions are asked about these environments, consequently affecting interpretations drawn from findings of ecological studies. However, its importance is greater than this. Equilibrium thinking in rangeland science has fostered a pervasive and self-referential narrative which holds that degradation and desertification are endemic in drylands, particularly those utilized by African livestock herders under communal forms of land tenure (see, for example, Stebbings, 1935; Grainger, 1982, 1990; Dregne, 1983; Lamprey, 1983; Chapman, 1992; Seely & Jacobson, 1994; Wolters, 1994; Middleton & Thomas, 1997). This degradation narrative carries critical implications for the institution of democratic policy and planning in these areas. The term non-equilibrium was coined by ecologist Wiens (1984) to describe the dynamics of arid and semi-arid ecosystems. As Illius & O’Connor (1999, p. 799) paraphrase, he argued that ...all ecological systems fall somewhere on a continuum from equilibrial to nonequilibrial ... the latter ... showing weak biotic coupling, independence of species, abiotic limitation rather than resource limitation, density independence and large stochastic effects . Illius and O’Connor insist that the validity of non-equilibrium theory depends on showing that non-equilibrium environments are qualitatively different from equilibrial environments governed by density-dependent interand intraspecific interactions (Illius & O’Connor, 1999, p. 800). While admitting the failings of rangeland GUEST EDITORIAL Journal of Biogeography, 29, 1595–1618

274 citations

Book
13 Nov 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce the basic rules of The Money Game, and then go into more detail in later chapters to understand how money and the pursuit of wealth can be viewed as a game.
Abstract: If you’re like most of the people I speak with, you’ve probably never thought of money and the pursuit of wealth as a game. When I talk with people and ask them about it, they generally say something like this to me: “Money is definitely not a game. It’s serious business.” The first step in the Busting Loose Process is to really “get” that everything within your financial world—income, net worth, investments, savings, taxes, expenses, invoices, accounts receivable and payable, profits, and so on—is part of an amazing, elaborate, gigantic, unique, and complex game. I introduce the basic rules of The Money Game in this chapter and then go into more detail in later chapters. sche_c01.qxd 6/29/06 11:16 AM Page 1

266 citations