scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Charles Rieu

Bio: Charles Rieu is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 54 citations.

Papers
More filters
Book
12 Oct 2017
TL;DR: The Catalogue of the Persian manuscripts in the British Museum as mentioned in this paper, which is a collection of Persian manuscripts, has been used as a reference for the study of Iran's literature.
Abstract: Catalogue of the Persian manuscripts in the British Museum , Catalogue of the Persian manuscripts in the British Museum , کتابخانه مرکزی دانشگاه علوم پزشکی تهران

57 citations


Cited by
More filters
Book
26 May 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the works and intellectual network of the Timurid historian Sharaf al Dín 'Alī Yazdī (d.1454) and present a holistic view of intellectual life in fifteenth century Iran.
Abstract: By focusing on the works and intellectual network of the Timurid historian Sharaf al Dīn 'Alī Yazdī (d.1454), this book presents a holistic view of intellectual life in fifteenth century Iran. Ilker Evrim Binbas argues that the intellectuals in this period formed informal networks which transcended political and linguistic boundaries, and spanned an area from the western fringes of the Ottoman State to bustling late medieval metropolises such as Cairo, Shiraz, and Samarkand. The network included an Ottoman revolutionary, a Mamluk prophet, and a Timurid occultist, as well as physicians, astronomers, devotees of the secret sciences, and those political figures who believed that the network was a force to be taken seriously. Also discussing the formation of an early modern Islamicate republic of letters, this book offers fresh insights on the study of intellectual history beyond the limitations imposed by nationalist methodologies, established genres, and recognized literary traditions.

48 citations

Book
29 Mar 2016
TL;DR: Gagan D. Sood as mentioned in this paper focuses on ordinary people - traders, pilgrims, bankers, clerics, brokers, and scribes, among others - who were engaged in activities marked by large distances and long silences.
Abstract: Based on the chance survival of a remarkable cache of documents, India and the Islamic Heartlands recaptures a vanished and forgotten world from the eighteenth century spanning much of today's Middle East and South Asia. Gagan D. S. Sood focuses on ordinary people - traders, pilgrims, bankers, clerics, brokers, and scribes, among others - who were engaged in activities marked by large distances and long silences. By elucidating their everyday lives in a range of settings, from the family household to the polity at large, Sood pieces together the connective tissue of a world that lay beyond the sovereign purview. Recapturing this obscured and neglected world helps us better understand the region during a pivotal moment in its history, and offers new answers to old questions concerning early modern Eurasia and its transition to colonialism.

46 citations

Book
18 Jan 2019
TL;DR: In this paper, the interaction between word and image in medieval Persian art is investigated, focusing on objects found in the main media at the time, and how artisans played with form, material and decoration to engage their audiences.
Abstract: This book investigates the interaction between word and image in medieval Persian art. Greater Iranian arts from the 10th to the 16th century are technically some of the finest produced anywhere. They are also intellectually engaging, showing the lively interaction between the verbal and the visual arts. Focusing on objects found in the main media at the time, Sheila S. Blair shows how artisans played with form, material and decoration to engage their audiences. She also shows how the reception of these objects has changed and that their present context has implications for our understanding of the past. It is lavishly illustrated in colour. It features 5 case studies - on ceramics, metalwares, painting, architecture and textiles - that showcase the variety of Persian art. It investigates the interaction between the visual and the verbal in a multi-lingual society. It looks at the transformation of everyday objects into works of art. It is written by one of the foremost experts in Persian art.

43 citations

Book ChapterDOI
05 Nov 2019
TL;DR: The authors examines the innovative panoply of views on the nature of political authority, and visions of the sultanate as its form of embodiment, and concludes that there is a strong correlation between one's perception of human nature and vision of ideal rulership.
Abstract: This chapter examines the innovative panoply of views on the nature of political authority, and visions of the sultanate as its form of embodiment. Virtually every author writing on rulership felt it necessary first to address the question of what political authority really was, its raison d'etre and status among humanity, how it was acquired or lost, the nature of the ruler and his morality, and historical models of rulership. No author doubted the consensus-confirmed view that the sultanate was the highest rank a human being could attain, but they took divergent paths in defining its nature, scope, and entangled boundaries. A common attitude was to reconcile between various historical and theoretical models of political authority including philosopher-kingship, prophethood, and imamate by defining them in ways compatible with their own visions of rulership. Elaborating on a particular vision of rulership almost always involved an explanation of human nature, human beings' existential status, and the purpose of life. There is a strong correlation between one's perception of human nature and vision of ideal rulership.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the later Ṣafavid period, historians have to rely to a disproportionate degree on the accounts of European travellers as discussed by the authors, such as Chardin, Tavernier and Olearius, who did not necessarily ask the kind of questions that interest historians today and rarely reached levels of Persian cultural and intellectual life beyond the Court and provincial officialdom.
Abstract: With few surviving chronicles and the loss of almost all the state archives, historians of the later Ṣafavid period have to rely to a disproportionate degree on the accounts of European travellers. Fortunately some of these, such as Chardin, Tavernier and Olearius, have left pre-eminent examples of the genre, but even so, few attempts have been made to explore their preceonceptions, prejudices or the extent of their understanding of Persian society. Almost all travelled for a well-defined purpose, as members of diplomatic missions, military advisers, missionaries or merchants, and their attitudes and the kind of information they recorded naturally were determined by these preoccupations. They did not necessarily ask the kind of questions that interest historians today and rarely reached levels of Persian cultural and intellectual life beyond the Court and provincial officialdom.

28 citations