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Cheryl A. Franklin

Bio: Cheryl A. Franklin is an academic researcher from Boise State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Educational technology & Primary education. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 14 publications receiving 316 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the ways elementary teachers use computer technology for instructional purposes and the factors that influence their use of computers and found that 84 percent of the teachers felt either well or very well prepared to integrate technology into curriculum, and that they were able to overcome the typical barriers to computer use in elementary classrooms.
Abstract: The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the ways elementary teachers use computer technology for instructional purposes and the factors that influence their use of computers. The population consisted of recent graduates from the elementary teacher preparation program at a mid-Atlantic university. Data were gathered using a survey instrument. The instrument addressed the four factors that support teachers’ use of computers: access and availability, preparation and training, leadership, and time. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed in this study. The response rate was 89 percent. The findings indicated that 84 percent of the teachers felt either well or very well prepared to integrate technology into curriculum, and that they were able to overcome the typical barriers to computer use in elementary classrooms. The teachers overwhelmingly indicated that computers have considerable potential for allowing students to discover or construct ideas for themselves and supported constructivist pedagogies when referring to computer use in elementary classrooms. Teacher preparation, teacher philosophy and grade level were identified as influential factors in the use of computers by the elementary teachers and the elementary students.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the findings of a five-year longitudinal study examining 23 elementary teachers' use of technology in the classroom and describe how these teachers' experiences in a technology-enriched elementary social studies methods course, taken in the fall of 2000, have affected their attitudes towards and use of the technology in their classrooms.
Abstract: This article describes the findings of a five-year longitudinal study examining 23 elementary teachers' use of technology in the classroom. Specifically, it describes how these teachers' experiences in a technology-enriched elementary social studies methods course, taken in the fall of 2000, have affected their attitudes towards and use of technology in their classrooms. Many have speculated that the demands of the first few years of teaching can dwarf the effects of teacher preparation, therefore reexamining the effects of preservice education in their fourth year of inservice teaching provides a perspective we need to validate and improve our efforts to better prepare elementary teachers to use technology to teach social studies.

40 citations

01 Apr 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the ways elementary teachers use computer technology for instructional purposes and the factors that influence their use of computers and found that 84 percent of the teachers felt either well or very well prepared to integrate technology into curriculum, and that they were able to overcome the typical barriers to computer use in elementary classrooms.
Abstract: The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the ways elementary teachers use computer technology for instructional purposes and the factors that influence their use of computers. The population consisted of recent graduates from the elementary teacher preparation program at a mid-Atlantic university. Data were gathered using a survey instrument. The instrument addressed the four factors that support teachers’ use of computers: access and availability, preparation and training, leadership, and time. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed in this study. The response rate was 89 percent. The findings indicated that 84 percent of the teachers felt either well or very well prepared to integrate technology into curriculum, and that they were able to overcome the typical barriers to computer use in elementary classrooms. The teachers overwhelmingly indicated that computers have considerable potential for allowing students to discover or construct ideas for themselves and supported constructivist pedagogies when referring to computer use in elementary classrooms. Teacher preparation, teacher philosophy and grade level were identified as influential factors in the use of computers by the elementary teachers and the elementary students.

26 citations

26 Mar 2007
TL;DR: The authors provides a synthesis that addresses the effect of technology on teaching and learning and analyzes these effects through the lens of diffusion theory, concluding with a call for future educational research in technology.
Abstract: Technology has been viewed as a lodestone for improving student academic performance and for increasing the flexibility of public schools This review provides a synthesis that addresses the effect of technology on teaching and learning and analyzes these effects through the lens of diffusion theory This synthesis examines the historical trends of technology, explores policy changes that have influenced technology’s role in K-12 curriculum, how these changes have resulted in a new definition of literacy that now includes technological literacy and in new social and cultural dynamics Third, this review examines the gaps between the vision for technology and its practical realities, concluding with a call for future educational research in technology

22 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey instrument designed to assess the development of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) for preservice teachers, based on Shulman's idea of pedagogical content knowledge.
Abstract: Based in Shulman’s idea of Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) has emerged as a useful frame for describing and understanding the goals for technology use in preservice teacher education. This paper addresses the need for a survey instrument designed to assess TPACK for preservice teachers. The paper describes survey development process and results from a pilot study on 124 preservice teachers. Data analysis procedures included Cronbach’s alpha statistics on the TPACK knowledge domains and factor analysis for each domain. Results suggest that, with the modification and/or deletion of 18 of the survey items, the survey is a reliable and valid instrument that will help educators design longitudinal studies to assess preservice teachers’ development of TPACK. (Keywords: TPACK, instrument development, preservice teachers) The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument designed to measure preservice teachers’ self-assessment of their Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and related knowledge domains included in the framework. TPACK is a term used increasingly to describe what teachers need to know to effectively integrate technology into their teaching practices. In this article, we detail the steps used to develop and validate an instrument to measure preservice teachers’ development of TPACK. TheoreTICAl FrAmeworK

1,224 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors reviewed personal, institutional and technological factors that encourage teachers' use of computer technology in teaching and learning processes and concluded that knowing the extent to which these barriers affect individuals and institutions may help in taking a decision on how to tackle them.
Abstract: Global investment in ICT to improve teaching and learning in schools have been initiated by many governments. Despite all these investments on ICT infrastructure, equipments and professional development to improve education in many countries, ICT adoption and integration in teaching and learning have been limited. This article reviews personal, institutional and technological factors that encourage teachers’ use of computer technology in teaching and learning processes. Also teacher-level, school-level and system-level factors that prevent teachers from ICT use are reviewed. These barriers include lack of teacher ICT skills; lack of teacher confidence; lack of pedagogical teacher training; l lack of suitable educational software; limited access to ICT; rigid structure of traditional education systems; restrictive curricula, etc. The article concluded that knowing the extent to which these barriers affect individuals and institutions may help in taking a decision on how to tackle them.

686 citations