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Chi Ming Tam

Other affiliations: Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Bio: Chi Ming Tam is an academic researcher from City University of Hong Kong. The author has contributed to research in topics: Construction management & Aggregate (composite). The author has an hindex of 42, co-authored 99 publications receiving 7033 citations. Previous affiliations of Chi Ming Tam include Shanghai Jiao Tong University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper empirically explored the relationships between different cooperation networks and innovation performance of SMEs using the technique of structural equation modeling, and found that there are significant positive relationships between inter-firm cooperation, cooperation with intermediary institutions, and cooperation with research organizations.

970 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a feasibility analysis of prefabrication in construction activities is provided based on a questionnaire survey and a financial analysis is also investigated by a local case study, which shows that wastage generation can be reduced by up to 100% after adopting prefabrics, in which up to 84.7% can be saved.

489 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the viability of the technology on construction waste recycling and their viability is reviewed. And the viable technology of the construction material recycling should be provided an easy reference for future applications.
Abstract: Environmental problems have been considered as a serious situation in the construction. Waste management is pressing harder with the alarming signal warning the industry. Reuse, recycling and reduce the wastes consider as the only methods to recover those waste generated; however, the implementations still have much room for improvement. This paper reviews the technology on construction waste recycling and their viability. Ten material recycling practices are studied, including: (i) asphalt, (ii) brick, (iii) concrete, (iv) ferrous metal, (v) glass, (vi) masonry, (vii) non-ferrous metal, (viii) paper and cardboard, (ix) plastic and (x) timber. The viable technology of the construction material recycling should be provided an easy reference for future applications.

387 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Li et al. as mentioned in this paper examined the impact of various factors on corporate decision in environmental information disclosure (EID): (1) whether or not to disclose; and (2) the level of disclosure.
Abstract: Based on the institutional theory, this article attempts to examine two consecutive questions regarding the impact of various factors on corporate decision in environmental information disclosure (EID): (1) whether or not to disclose; and (2) the level of disclosure. The relevance of these factors is empirically tested using data collected from publicly listed manufacturing companies from 2006 to 2008 in China. Some interesting findings appear. We find that firms that are state-owned, those that operate in environmentally sensitive industries, those having more industrial peers engaged in EID, and those with better reputation are more likely to disclose environmental information. When it comes to the content of EID, variables that attempt to capture external institutional pressures exhibit either no or weak explanatory power. Only the variable of organizational image and reputation is demonstrated to have a significant impact on both the act and the content of EID. This study provides a snapshot of the dialogues between constituencies in the organizational field and EID development.

301 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relationship between cleaner production and business performance was analyzed using Structure Equation Model (SEM) to find an overall positive impact of cleaner production on firm's business performance.

267 citations


Cited by
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Reference EntryDOI
31 Oct 2001
TL;DR: The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as mentioned in this paper is an independent organization devoted to the development of standards for testing and materials, and is a member of IEEE 802.11.
Abstract: The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is an independent organization devoted to the development of standards.

3,792 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them, and describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative.
Abstract: What makes organizations so similar? We contend that the engine of rationalization and bureaucratization has moved from the competitive marketplace to the state and the professions. Once a set of organizations emerges as a field, a paradox arises: rational actors make their organizations increasingly similar as they try to change them. We describe three isomorphic processes-coercive, mimetic, and normative—leading to this outcome. We then specify hypotheses about the impact of resource centralization and dependency, goal ambiguity and technical uncertainty, and professionalization and structuration on isomorphic change. Finally, we suggest implications for theories of organizations and social change.

2,134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Dec 2015-Nature
TL;DR: Historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency are examined and a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution are found, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization.
Abstract: Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

1,439 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this paper, an analysis of prior research on how firms leverage external sources of innovation is presented, which suggests a four-phase model in which a linear process of obtaining, integrating, integrating and commercializing external innovations is combined with interaction between the firm and its collaborators.
Abstract: This article reviews research on open innovation that considers how and why firms commercialize external sources of innovations. It examines both the “outside-in” and “coupled” modes of Enkel et al. (2009). From an analysis of prior research on how firms leverage external sources of innovation, it suggests a four-phase model in which a linear process — (1) obtaining, (2) integrating and (3) commercializing external innovations — is combined with (4) interaction between the firm and its collaborators. This model is used to classify papers taken from the top 25 innovation journals identified by Linton and Thongpapan (2004), complemented by highly cited work beyond those journals. A review of 291 open innovation-related publications from these sources shows that the majority of these articles indeed address elements of this inbound open innovation process model. Specifically, it finds that researchers have front-loaded their examination of the leveraging process, with an emphasis on obtaining innovations from external sources. However, there is a relative dearth of research related to integrating and commercializing these innovations.Research on obtaining innovations includes searching, enabling, filtering, and acquiring — each category with its own specific set of mechanisms and conditions. Integrating innovations has been mostly studied from an absorptive capacity perspective, with less attention given to the impact of competencies and culture (including not-invented-here). Commercializing innovations puts the most emphasis on how external innovations create value rather than how firms capture value from those innovations. Finally, the interaction phase considers both feedback for the linear process and reciprocal innovation processes such as co-creation, network collaboration and community innovation.This review and synthesis suggests several gaps in prior research. One is a tendency to ignore the importance of business models, despite their central role in distinguishing open innovation from earlier research on inter-organizational collaboration in innovation. Another gap is a tendency in open innovation to use “innovation” in a way inconsistent with earlier definitions in innovation management. The article concludes with recommendations for future research that include examining the end-to-end innovation commercialization process, and studying the moderators and limits of leveraging external sources of innovation.

1,306 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a four-phase model in which a linear process of obtaining, integrating, integrating and commercializing external innovations is combined with interaction between the firm and its collaborators.

1,211 citations