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Christian Serre

Bio: Christian Serre is an academic researcher from École Normale Supérieure. The author has contributed to research in topics: Adsorption & Metal-organic framework. The author has an hindex of 110, co-authored 419 publications receiving 56800 citations. Previous affiliations of Christian Serre include Collège de France & Centre national de la recherche scientifique.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
23 Sep 2005-Science
TL;DR: This crystal structure for porous chromium terephthalate, MIL-101, with large poresizes and surface area has potential as a nanomold for monodisperse nanomaterials, as illustrated here by the incorporation of Keggin polyanions within the cages.
Abstract: We combined targeted chemistry and computational design to create a crystal structure for porous chromium terephthalate, MIL-101, with very large pore sizes and surface area. Its zeotype cubic structure has a giant cell volume (approximately 702,000 cubic angstroms), a hierarchy of extra-large pore sizes (approximately 30 to 34 angstroms), and a Langmuir surface area for N2 of approximately 5900 +/- 300 square meters per gram. Beside the usual properties of porous compounds, this solid has potential as a nanomold for monodisperse nanomaterials, as illustrated here by the incorporation of Keggin polyanions within the cages.

4,369 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that specific non-toxic porous iron(III)-based metal-organic frameworks with engineered cores and surfaces, as well as imaging properties, function as superior nanocarriers for efficient controlled delivery of challenging antitumoural and retroviral drugs against cancer and AIDS.
Abstract: In the domain of health, one important challenge is the efficient delivery of drugs in the body using non-toxic nanocarriers. Most of the existing carrier materials show poor drug loading (usually less than 5 wt% of the transported drug versus the carrier material) and/or rapid release of the proportion of the drug that is simply adsorbed (or anchored) at the external surface of the nanocarrier. In this context, porous hybrid solids, with the ability to tune their structures and porosities for better drug interactions and high loadings, are well suited to serve as nanocarriers for delivery and imaging applications. Here we show that specific non-toxic porous iron(III)-based metal-organic frameworks with engineered cores and surfaces, as well as imaging properties, function as superior nanocarriers for efficient controlled delivery of challenging antitumoural and retroviral drugs (that is, busulfan, azidothymidine triphosphate, doxorubicin or cidofovir) against cancer and AIDS. In addition to their high loadings, they also potentially associate therapeutics and diagnostics, thus opening the way for theranostics, or personalized patient treatments.

3,472 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Metal Organic Frameworks in Biomedicine Patricia Horcajada, Ruxandra Gref, Tarek Baati, Phoebe K. Allan, Guillaume Maurin, Patrick Couvreur, G erard F erey, Russell E. Morris, and Christian Serre.
Abstract: Metal Organic Frameworks in Biomedicine Patricia Horcajada,* Ruxandra Gref, Tarek Baati, Phoebe K. Allan, Guillaume Maurin, Patrick Couvreur, G erard F erey, Russell E. Morris, and Christian Serre* Institut Lavoisier, UMR CNRS 8180, Universit e de Versailles St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex, France Facult e de Pharmacie, UMR CNRS 8612, Universit e Paris-Sud, 92296 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex, France Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR CNRS 5253, Universit e Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier cedex 05, France EaStChem School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews Purdie Building, St Andrews, KY16 9ST U.K.

3,400 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Analysis of the hydration process by solid-state NMR has clearly indicated that the trapped water molecules interact with the carboxylate groups through hydrogen bonds, but do not affect the hydroxyl species bridging the aluminum atoms.
Abstract: Aluminum 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate Al(OH)[O2CC6H4CO2]⋅ [HO2CC6H4CO2H]0.70 or MIL-53 as (Al) has been hydrothermally synthesized by heating a mixture of aluminum nitrate, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, and water, for three days at 220 °C. Its 3 D framework is built up of infinite trans chains of corner-sharing AlO4(OH)2 octahedra. The chains are interconnected by the 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate groups, creating 1 D rhombic-shaped tunnels. Disordered 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid molecules are trapped inside these tunnels. Their evacuation upon heating, between 275 and 420 °C, leads to a nanoporous open-framework (MIL-53 ht (Al) or Al(OH)[O2CC6H4CO2]) with empty pores of diameter 8.5 A. This solid exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1590(1) m2 g−1 together with a remarkable thermal stability, since it starts to decompose only at 500 °C. At room temperature, the solid reversibly absorbs water in its tunnels, causing a very large breathing effect and shrinkage of the pores. Analysis of the hydration process by solid-state NMR (1H, 13C, 27Al) has clearly indicated that the trapped water molecules interact with the carboxylate groups through hydrogen bonds, but do not affect the hydroxyl species bridging the aluminum atoms. The hydrogen bonds between water and the oxygen atoms of the framework are responsible for the contraction of the rhombic channels. The structures of the three forms have been determined by means of powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal data for MIL-53 as (Al) are as follows: orthorhombic system, Pnma (no. 62), a = 17.129(2), b = 6.628(1), c = 12.182(1) A; for MIL-53 ht (Al), orthorhombic system, Imma (no. 74), a = 6.608(1), b = 16.675(3), c = 12.813(2) A; for MIL-53 lt (Al), monoclinic system, Cc (no. 9), a = 19.513(2), b = 7.612(1), c = 6.576(1) A, β = 104.24(1)°.

1,737 citations


Cited by
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[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Aug 2013-Science
TL;DR: Metal-organic frameworks are porous materials that have potential for applications such as gas storage and separation, as well as catalysis, and methods are being developed for making nanocrystals and supercrystals of MOFs for their incorporation into devices.
Abstract: Crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are formed by reticular synthesis, which creates strong bonds between inorganic and organic units. Careful selection of MOF constituents can yield crystals of ultrahigh porosity and high thermal and chemical stability. These characteristics allow the interior of MOFs to be chemically altered for use in gas separation, gas storage, and catalysis, among other applications. The precision commonly exercised in their chemical modification and the ability to expand their metrics without changing the underlying topology have not been achieved with other solids. MOFs whose chemical composition and shape of building units can be multiply varied within a particular structure already exist and may lead to materials that offer a synergistic combination of properties.

10,934 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1988-Nature
TL;DR: In this paper, a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) is presented.
Abstract: Deposits of clastic carbonate-dominated (calciclastic) sedimentary slope systems in the rock record have been identified mostly as linearly-consistent carbonate apron deposits, even though most ancient clastic carbonate slope deposits fit the submarine fan systems better. Calciclastic submarine fans are consequently rarely described and are poorly understood. Subsequently, very little is known especially in mud-dominated calciclastic submarine fan systems. Presented in this study are a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) that reveals a >250 m thick calciturbidite complex deposited in a calciclastic submarine fan setting. Seven facies are recognised from core and thin section characterisation and are grouped into three carbonate turbidite sequences. They include: 1) Calciturbidites, comprising mostly of highto low-density, wavy-laminated bioclast-rich facies; 2) low-density densite mudstones which are characterised by planar laminated and unlaminated muddominated facies; and 3) Calcidebrites which are muddy or hyper-concentrated debrisflow deposits occurring as poorly-sorted, chaotic, mud-supported floatstones. These

9,929 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jun 2003-Nature
TL;DR: This work has shown that highly porous frameworks held together by strong metal–oxygen–carbon bonds and with exceptionally large surface area and capacity for gas storage have been prepared and their pore metrics systematically varied and functionalized.
Abstract: The long-standing challenge of designing and constructing new crystalline solid-state materials from molecular building blocks is just beginning to be addressed with success. A conceptual approach that requires the use of secondary building units to direct the assembly of ordered frameworks epitomizes this process: we call this approach reticular synthesis. This chemistry has yielded materials designed to have predetermined structures, compositions and properties. In particular, highly porous frameworks held together by strong metal-oxygen-carbon bonds and with exceptionally large surface area and capacity for gas storage have been prepared and their pore metrics systematically varied and functionalized.

8,013 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The energy that can be stored in Li-air and Li-S cells is compared with Li-ion; the operation of the cells is discussed, as are the significant hurdles that will have to be overcome if such batteries are to succeed.
Abstract: Li-ion batteries have transformed portable electronics and will play a key role in the electrification of transport. However, the highest energy storage possible for Li-ion batteries is insufficient for the long-term needs of society, for example, extended-range electric vehicles. To go beyond the horizon of Li-ion batteries is a formidable challenge; there are few options. Here we consider two: Li-air (O(2)) and Li-S. The energy that can be stored in Li-air (based on aqueous or non-aqueous electrolytes) and Li-S cells is compared with Li-ion; the operation of the cells is discussed, as are the significant hurdles that will have to be overcome if such batteries are to succeed. Fundamental scientific advances in understanding the reactions occurring in the cells as well as new materials are key to overcoming these obstacles. The potential benefits of Li-air and Li-S justify the continued research effort that will be needed.

7,895 citations