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Christine Skubisz

Bio: Christine Skubisz is an academic researcher from Emerson College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Risk perception & Elaboration likelihood model. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 16 publications receiving 282 citations. Previous affiliations of Christine Skubisz include University of Delaware & University of Maryland, College Park.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that message topic and source both play roles in determining message recall as well as in determining how memorable messages impacted behavior.
Abstract: Often, people are able to recall a message on a particular topic for a long period of time. These memorable messages have the ability to influence behavior when they are recalled from memory long after initial exposure. Knowing the topics and sources of the messages that are remembered about breast cancer can improve the efficacy of future breast cancer outreach. To this end, 359 women completed an online survey about memorable breast cancer messages. Most women (60%) recalled a memorable message, described it, identified its source, and noted whether it had resulted in prevention or detection behaviors. Four categories of message topics emerged: early detection (37.3%), awareness (30.9%), treatment (25.8%), and prevention (6%). Furthermore, five categories of sources of these memorable messages were found: media (35.5%), friends (22.2%), family (21.6%), medical professionals (15.2%), and others (5.5%). The media were a major source of all four topics of messages, although family members, friends, and the...

81 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Negative emotions of fear, sadness, and anger, and positive emotions of hope and relief were analyzed for their associations with prevention and detection breast cancer behaviors.
Abstract: Memorable messages about breast cancer sent by different sources, such as friends and family members, were analyzed for the action tendency emotions that they evoked. Negative emotions of fear, sadness, and anger, and positive emotions of hope and relief were analyzed for their associations with prevention and detection breast cancer behaviors. Messages that evoked fear were significantly more likely to be associated with detection behaviors, whereas messages that evoked relief were significantly less likely to be associated with detection behaviors than messages that did not evoke these emotions. These results are consistent with control theory and also show that friends and family are important sources of memorable messages about breast cancer.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The content of the messages being presented in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Tips from Former Smokers campaign is evaluated and it is indicated that the campaign contained more fear and guilt appeals, than other emotions.
Abstract: Years of research on message design and effects provides insight regarding the most persuasive message appeals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the content of the messages being presented in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Tips from Former Smokers campaign. A content analysis of persuasive message design features was conducted to critically examine campaign content. Campaign materials were coded for the presence of message variables including emotional appeals, evidence presentation, message framing, attitude functions, and source characteristics. Four independent coders analyzed 122 campaign messages, including video, print, and social media posts. Results from this content analysis indicate that the campaign contained more fear and guilt appeals, than other emotions. Evidence was typically presented in the form of a narrative from sources with firsthand experience. Suggestions for persuasive message design in large-scale public health communication campaigns are discussed.

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Eye-tracking technology is used to explore the degree to which people pay visual attention to the information contained in food nutrition labels and front-of-package nutrition symbols and indicates that people with motivation to shop for healthful foods spent significantly more time looking at all available nutrition information.
Abstract: Obesity is linked to numerous diseases including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. To address this issue, food and beverage manufacturers as well as health organizations have developed nutrition symbols and logos to be placed on the front of food packages to guide consumers to more healthful food choices. In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested information on the extent to which consumers notice, use, and understand front-of-package nutrition symbols. In response, this study used eye-tracking technology to explore the degree to which people pay visual attention to the information contained in food nutrition labels and front-of-package nutrition symbols. Results indicate that people with motivation to shop for healthful foods spent significantly more time looking at all available nutrition information compared to people with motivation to shop for products on the basis of taste. Implications of these results for message design, food labeling, and public policy are discussed.

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2017-Appetite
TL;DR: Support for the prediction that natural labeled products are evaluated as more healthful was found, and despite the fact that natural products contained the same number of calories as their regular counterparts, participants estimated thatnatural products contained 18% fewer calories.

26 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2009

7,241 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

3,628 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 Sep 2011-Science
TL;DR: This review of current practice for communicating uncertainties visually, using examples drawn from sport, weather, climate, health, economics, and politics, shows how the effectiveness of some graphics clearly depends on the relative numeracy of an audience.
Abstract: We are all faced with uncertainty about the future, but we can get the measure of some uncertainties in terms of probabilities. Probabilities are notoriously difficult to communicate effectively to lay audiences, and in this review we examine current practice for communicating uncertainties visually, using examples drawn from sport, weather, climate, health, economics, and politics. Despite the burgeoning interest in infographics, there is limited experimental evidence on how different types of visualizations are processed and understood, although the effectiveness of some graphics clearly depends on the relative numeracy of an audience. Fortunately, it is increasingly easy to present data in the form of interactive visualizations and in multiple types of representation that can be adjusted to user needs and capabilities. Nonetheless, communicating deeper uncertainties resulting from incomplete or disputed knowledge—or from essential indeterminacy about the future—remains a challenge.

527 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Most of the studies on biases and heuristics in medical decision making are based on hypothetical vignettes, raising concerns about applicability of these findings to actual decision making.
Abstract: Background. The role of cognitive biases and heuristics in medical decision making is of growing interest. The purpose of this study was to determine whether studies on cognitive biases and heurist...

370 citations