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Author

Christopher Gill

Other affiliations: University of Cambridge
Bio: Christopher Gill is an academic researcher from University of Exeter. The author has contributed to research in topics: Stoicism & Ancient philosophy. The author has an hindex of 20, co-authored 53 publications receiving 1543 citations. Previous affiliations of Christopher Gill include University of Cambridge.


Papers
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Book
01 Jun 2006
TL;DR: The Structure of Self in Stoicism and Epicureanism is discussed in this paper, where the authors present a reading of Platonic psychology and compare it with Stoic Passions.
Abstract: Introduction I. THE STRUCTURED SELF IN STOICISM AND EPICUREANISM 1. Psychophysical Holism in Stoicism and Epicureanism 2. Psychological Holism and Socratic Ideals 3. Development and the Structured Self II. THE UNSTRUCTURED SELF: STOIC PASSIONS AND THE RECEPTION OF PLATO 4. Competing Readings of Stoic Passions 5. Competing Readings of Platonic Psychology III. THEORETICAL ISSUES AND LITERARY RECEPTION 6. Issues in Selfhood: Subjectivity and Objectivity 7. Literary Reception: Structured and Unstructured Selves

180 citations

Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: A major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer, Greek tragedy, and philosophy can be found in this article, where the authors define an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the person as an interlocutor in a series of types of psychological and ethical dialogue.
Abstract: This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer, Greek tragedy, and philosophy. The focus in on norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. The key thesis is that, to understand Greek thinking of this type, we need to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the self. The book defines an 'objective-participant' conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of types of psychological and ethical dialogue. The book is both an original contribution to the history of ideas of personality and the self and also offers sustained analysis and new interpretations of a number of important topics in Greek philosophy and literature. These topics include: Homeric decision-making; the problematic hero in Homer's Iliad and Greek tragedy; monologues of self-division in Greek poetry; the tripartite division of the soul and ethical education in Plato's Republic ; Aristotle's ideas about 'being yourself' and meeting the claims of others; Greek philosophical thinking about what it means to be fully 'human' or 'divine'. This book is intended for scholars and university students (undergraduate and graduate) of classical literature, ancient history, and ancient philosophy.

158 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: Wood and Feeney as mentioned in this paper chart the borderland between truth and fiction in the ancient world by considering how far "lying" was distinguished from "fiction" at different periods and in different genres.
Abstract: Where the boundary lies between falsehood and fiction, between an actual untruth and an admitted invention, has set off many debates in intellectual circles. In classical studies, this issue has gained prominence through the upsurge of interest in the ancient novel and through recent work on the rhetorical character of ancient historiography. This pathfinding collection of essays charts the borderland between falsehood and fiction in the ancient world, especially by considering how far "lying" was distinguished from "fiction" at different periods and in different genres. The areas covered are early Greek poetry (E. L. Bowie), Plato (Christopher Gill), Greek and Roman historiography (J. L. Moles and T. P. Wiseman), and the Greek and Roman novel (J. R. Morgan and Andrew Laird). Michael Wood and D. C. Feeney discuss the literary critical questions involved and draw connections with contemporary debate. All Greek and Latin passages are translated into English, and the collection is designed to be accessible to students of literature and history generally, as well as to classicists.

146 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 May 2003

91 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors develop a theory of emotion as a feedback system whose influence on behavior is typically indirect, and justify replacing the direct causation model with the feedback model to justify replacing a large body of empirical findings.
Abstract: Fear causes fleeing and thereby saves lives: this exemplifies a popular and common sense but increasingly untenable view that the direct causation of behavior is the primary function of emotion. Instead, the authors develop a theory of emotion as a feedback system whose influence on behavior is typically indirect. By providing feedback and stimulating retrospective appraisal of actions, conscious emotional states can promote learning and alter guidelines for future behavior. Behavior may also be chosen to pursue (or avoid) anticipated emotional outcomes. Rapid, automatic affective responses, in contrast to the full-blown conscious emotions, may inform cognition and behavioral choice and thereby help guide current behavior. The automatic affective responses may also remind the person of past emotional outcomes and provide useful guides as to what emotional outcomes may be anticipated in the present. To justify replacing the direct causation model with the feedback model, the authors review a large body of empirical findings.

1,361 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: This chapter collates the mathematical approaches to the aeration process and explains the concepts of modeling in a simplified manner, which have culminated in the modeling of the oxygen movements within the plant.
Abstract: Publisher Summary This chapter illustrates the developments in the field of aeration since 1960, which have culminated in the modeling of the oxygen movements within the plant. The chapter collates the mathematical approaches to the aeration process and explains the concepts of modeling in a simplified manner. It is noted that the environment exerts a considerable influence on the directional flow of the respiratory gases within the plant and the directional exchange with the atmosphere. Oxygen can enter the plant body in a variety of ways. In non-aquatic species, the stomata and lenticels provide paths of low resistance for the entry and exit of both oxygen and carbon dioxide. In submerged astomatal aquatics, surface permeabilities are sufficiently high to allow the necessary gas transference. Plants rooted in unsaturated soils are exposed to an oxygen-rich environment over the greater part of their shoot and root surfaces. Oxygen enters the plant in the combined state as water. As water, it is transported from root to shoot in the xylem where a proportion is finally released into the liquid phase within the chloroplasts during the photolysis stage of photosynthesis.

1,358 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Each perennial woody plant is a highly integrated system of competing carbohydrate sinks (utilization sites).
Abstract: Each perennial woody plant is a highly integrated system of competing carbohydrate sinks (utilization sites). Internal competition for carbohydrates is shown by changes in rates of carbohydrate movement from sources to sinks and reversals in direction of carbohydrate transport as the relative sink strengths of various organs change. Most carbohydrates are produced in foliage leaves but some are synthesized in cotyledons, hypocotyls, buds, twigs, stems, flowers, fruits, and strobili. Although the bulk of the carbohydrate pool moves to sinks through the phloem, some carbohydrates are obtained by sinks from the xylem sap. Sugars are actively accumulated in the phloem and move passively to sinks along a concentration gradient. The dry weight of a mature woody plant represents only a small proportion of the photosynthate it produced. This discrepancy results not only from consumption of plant tissues by herbivores and shedding of plant parts, but also from depletion of carbohydrates by respiration, leaching, exudation, secretion, translocation to other plants through root grafts and mycorrhizae and losses to parasites. Large spatial and temporal variations occur in the use of reserve- and currently produced carbohydrates in metabolism and growth of shoots, stems, roots, and reproductive structures. A portion of the carbohydrate pool is diverted for production of chemicals involved in defense against fungi, herbivores, and competing plants. Woody plants accumulate carbohydrates during periods of excess production and deplete carbohydrates when the rate of utilization exceeds the rate of production. Stored carbohydrates play an important role in metabolism, growth, defense, cold hardiness, and postponement or prevention of plant mortality.

633 citations