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Christopher Heath Wellman

Other affiliations: Guilford College
Bio: Christopher Heath Wellman is an academic researcher from Georgia State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Political philosophy & Politics. The author has an hindex of 21, co-authored 37 publications receiving 1526 citations. Previous affiliations of Christopher Heath Wellman include Guilford College.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2008-Ethics
TL;DR: This article argued that every legitimate state has the right to close its doors to all potential immigrants, even refugees desperately seeking asylum from incompetent or corrupt political regimes that are either unable or unwilling to protect their citizens' basic moral rights.
Abstract: In this article I appeal to freedom of association to defend a state’s right to control immigration over its territorial borders. Without denying that those of us in wealthy societies may have extremely demanding duties of global distributive justice, I ultimately reach the stark conclusion that every legitimate state has the right to close its doors to all potential immigrants, even refugees desperately seeking asylum from incompetent or corrupt political regimes that are either unable or unwilling to protect their citizens’ basic moral rights. This article is divided into four sections. First, I argue for a presumptive case in favor of a state’s right to limit immigration as an instance of its more general right to freedom of association. In the second and third sections, I respond to egalitarian and libertarian cases for open borders. Finally, in the fourth section, I consider the permissibility of screening immigrants based upon their race, ethnicity or religion.

226 citations

Book
15 Jul 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the role of international criminal law and international distributive justice in defending self-determination and self-government in the context of armed intervention and political assassinations.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Democracy and Self-Determination 3. Secession 4. International Criminal Law 5. Armed Intervention and Political Assassination 6. International Distributive Justice 7. Immigration 8. Conclusion References

131 citations

MonographDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The case for statism and the case for self-determination are discussed in detail in this article, with a focus on self-defence and self-organization in the context of national self-government.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. The case for statism 3. Valuing self-determination 4. Lincoln on secession 5. The truth in nationalism 6. Political coercion and exploitation 7. Secession and international law 8. The velvet transformation.

127 citations

Reference BookDOI
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: A companion to applied ethics as discussed by the authors, a companion to the applied ethics, a companion of applied ethics is a person who is a friend to the application of ethics in the field of applied ethical practice.
Abstract: A companion to applied ethics / , A companion to applied ethics / , کتابخانه مرکزی دانشگاه علوم پزشکی تهران

119 citations

Book
30 Sep 2011
TL;DR: In this paper, Wellman and Cole argue that the commitment to the moral equality of all human beings - which legitimate states can be expected to hold - means national borders must be open: equal respect requires equal access, both to territory and membership.
Abstract: The book has a clear focus on philosophical theory and ethical argument, referring to economic and other evidence for the positions taken where this is helpful, but making it clear that what is ultimately at stake is the morality of border controls. Each author sets out a distinct and thought-provoking position on the ethics of immigration, with Christopher Wellman arguing that legitimate states have the right to have any immigration regime they want, and Phillip Cole arguing that national borders should be completely open. By setting out what may seem to be radical positions, Wellman and Cole succeed in showing clearly what is at stake when it comes to the ethics of migration policy. Do states have the right to prevent potential immigrants from crossing their borders, or should people have the freedom to migrate and settle wherever they wish? Christopher Heath Wellman and Phillip Cole develop and defend opposing answers to this timely and important question. Appealing to the right to freedom of association, Wellman contends that legitimate states have broad discretion to exclude potential immigrants, even those who desperately seek to enter. Against this, Cole argues that the commitment to the moral equality of all human beings - which legitimate states can be expected to hold - means national borders must be open: equal respect requires equal access, both to territory and membership; and that the idea of open borders is less radical than it seems when we consider how many territorial and community boundaries have this open nature. In addition to engaging with each other's arguments, Wellman and Cole address a range of central questions and prominent positions on this topic. The authors therefore provide a critical overview of the major contributions to the ethics of migration, as well as developing original, provocative positions of their own.

107 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: McQueen et al. as mentioned in this paper presented a special symposium issue of Social Identities under the editorship of Griffith University's Rob McQueen and UBC's Wes Pue and with contributions from McQueen, Ian Duncanson, Renisa Mawani, David Williams, Emma Cunliffe, Chidi Oguamanam, W. Wesley Pue, Fatou Camara, and Dianne Kirkby.
Abstract: Scholars of culture, humanities and social sciences have increasingly come to an appreciation of the importance of the legal domain in social life, while critically engaged socio-legal scholars around the world have taken up the task of understanding "Law's Empire" in all of its cultural, political, and economic dimensions. The questions arising from these intersections, and addressing imperialisms past and present forms the subject matter of a special symposium issue of Social Identities under the editorship of Griffith University's Rob McQueen, and UBC's Wes Pue and with contributions from McQueen, Ian Duncanson, Renisa Mawani, David Williams, Emma Cunliffe, Chidi Oguamanam, W. Wesley Pue, Fatou Camara, and Dianne Kirkby. This paper introduces the volume, forthcoming in late 2007. The central problematique of this issue has previously been explored through the 2005 Law's Empire conference, an informal but vibrant postcolonial legal studies network.

1,813 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001

546 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors investigated the relationship between the emotional states of gratitude and indebtedness in two studies and found that with increasing expectations of return communicated with a gift by a benefactor, indebtedness should increase but gratitude should decrease.
Abstract: We investigated the relationship between the emotional states of gratitude and indebtedness in two studies. Although many have suggested that these affects are essentially equivalent, we submit that they are distinct emotional states. Following Heider (1958), we propose that with increasing expectations of return communicated with a gift by a benefactor, indebtedness should increase but gratitude should decrease. The results of two vignette studies supported this hypothesis, and patterns of thought/action tendencies showed these states to be distinct. In addition, we found that with increasing expectations communicated by a benefactor, beneficiaries reported that they would be less likely to help the benefactor in the future. Taken together, we argue that the debt of gratitude is internally generated, and is not analogous to an economic form of indebtedness.

300 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the standard account of political representation is thus inadequate to explain political representation throughout the globe, and they offer a general theory for political representation which explains representation simply by reference to a relevant audience accepting a person as such.
Abstract: Nondemocratic “representatives” increasingly act on the global stage, as “representatives” of their dictatorships to the United Nations, or when an NGO represents prisoners of war. Standard accounts of political representation depend upon democratic institutions (like elections) and a certain kind of proper activity (like deliberation and constituent accountability) and thus cannot explain how these people are representatives at all. I argue that the standard account of political representation is thus inadequate to explain political representation throughout the globe. I offer a general theory of political representation which explains representation simply by reference to a relevant audience accepting a person as such. When audiences use democratic rules of recognition, the familiar cases arise. When audiences use nondemocratic rules of recognition, nondemocratic cases arise. The result is that political representation, per se, is not a democratic phenomenon at all. The account offers a more parsimoniou...

258 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that certain kinds of "collective rights" for minority cultures are consistent with liberal democratic principles, and that standard liberal objections to recognizing such rights on grounds of individual freedom, social justice, and national unity can be answered.
Abstract: The increasingly multicultural fabric of modern societies has given rise to many new issues and conflicts, as ethnic and national minorities demand recognition and support for their cultural identity. This book presents a new conception of the rights and status of minority cultures. It argues that certain sorts of 'collective rights' for minority cultures are consistent with liberal democratic principles, and that standard liberal objections to recognizing such rights on grounds of individual freedom, social justice, and national unity, can be answered. However, Professor Kymlicka emphasises that no single formula can be applied to all groups and that the needs and aspirations of immigrants are very different from those of indigenous peoples and national minorities. The book discusses issues such as language rights, group representation, religious education, federalism, and secession - issues which are central to understanding multicultural politics, but which have been surprisingly neglected in contemporary liberal theory.

241 citations