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Clayton E. Cramer

Bio: Clayton E. Cramer is an academic researcher from College of Western Idaho. The author has contributed to research in topics: Right to keep and bear arms & Poison control. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 26 publications receiving 158 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: Racist arms laws predate the establishment of the United States as discussed by the authors, and the perception that free blacks were sympathetic to the plight of their enslaved brothers and the "dangerous" example that blacks could actually handle freedom often led New World governments to disarm all slaves, both slave and free.
Abstract: Racist arms laws predate the establishment of the United States. This is not surprising. Blacks in the New World were often slaves, and revolts against slave owners often degenerated into less selective forms of racial warfare. The perception that free blacks were sympathetic to the plight of their enslaved brothers and the "dangerous" example that blacks could actually handle freedom often led New World governments to disarm all blacks, both slave and free.

47 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this paper, the history and effects on crime rates of adoption of "shall issue" concealed weapon permit laws are examined, and the effects of such laws on the crime rate are examined.
Abstract: Examines the history and effects on crime rates of adoption of "shall issue" concealed weapon permit laws.

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the last few months, discussion of the wisdom or folly of allowing guns on college campuses has erupted as discussed by the authors, and several state legislatures have discussed bills to allow students, employees, and even visitors who have concealed carry permit licenses to be armed on campus.
Abstract: In the last few months, discussion of the wisdom or folly of allowing guns on college campuses has erupted. Several state legislatures have discussed bills to allow students, employees, and even visitors who have concealed carry permit licenses to be armed on campus. Some public universities have already lost legal battles with their state legislatures on this matter; faculty, staff, and students are now free to carry on campus at the University of Colorado. The University of Utah lost a similar suit, but students are prohibited by the student conduct code from possessing a firearm on campus. (Employees and visitors do not appear to be similarly restricted.) Acad. Quest. (2014) 27:411–425 DOI 10.1007/s12129-014-9451-2

12 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: In this paper, Limitations of Census Data Emancipation Manumission Internal Immigration Restrictions Disabilities, Slave-Dumping, and the 1840 Census International Black Migration Bibliography Index Index
Abstract: Preface Limitations of Census Data Emancipation Manumission Internal Immigration Restrictions Disabilities, Slave-Dumping, and the 1840 Census International Black Migration Bibliography Index

12 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The legislative history of the Second Amendment Problems of Judicial Interpretation "To Keep and Carry Arms Wherever They Went" "No Negro... Shall Be Allowed To Carry Fire-Arms" "Carrying Concealed Weapons Is a Grievous Evil" "A Proper Reason for Carrying a Pistol" Civil Rights, Civil Disturbances The Right Comes Out of Its Coma? At the Crossroads Selected Bibliography Index as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Introduction Preface Acknowledgments Definitions European Origins The Legislative History of the Second Amendment Problems of Judicial Interpretation "To Keep and Carry Arms Wherever They Went" "No Negro ... Shall Be Allowed To Carry Fire-Arms" "Carrying Concealed Weapons Is a Grievous Evil" "A Proper Reason for Carrying a Pistol" Civil Rights, Civil Disturbances The Right Comes Out of Its Coma? At the Crossroads Selected Bibliography Index

10 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, Cardozo et al. proposed a model for conflict resolution in the context of bankruptcy resolution, which is based on the work of the Cardozo Institute of Conflict Resolution.
Abstract: American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review 17 Am. Bankr. Inst. L. Rev., No. 1, Spring, 2009. Boston College Law Review 50 B.C. L. Rev., No. 3, May, 2009. Boston University Public Interest Law Journal 18 B.U. Pub. Int. L.J., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution 10 Cardozo J. Conflict Resol., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Cardozo Public Law, Policy, & Ethics Journal 7 Cardozo Pub. L. Pol’y & Ethics J., No. 3, Summer, 2009. Chicago Journal of International Law 10 Chi. J. Int’l L., No. 1, Summer, 2009. Colorado Journal of International Environmental Law and Policy 20 Colo. J. Int’l Envtl. L. & Pol’y, No. 2, Winter, 2009. Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts 32 Colum. J.L. & Arts, No. 3, Spring, 2009. Connecticut Public Interest Law Journal 8 Conn. Pub. Int. L.J., No. 2, Spring-Summer, 2009. Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy 18 Cornell J.L. & Pub. Pol’y, No. 1, Fall, 2008. Cornell Law Review 94 Cornell L. Rev., No. 5, July, 2009. Creighton Law Review 42 Creighton L. Rev., No. 3, April, 2009. Criminal Law Forum 20 Crim. L. Forum, Nos. 2-3, Pp. 173-394, 2009. Delaware Journal of Corporate Law 34 Del. J. Corp. L., No. 2, Pp. 433-754, 2009. Environmental Law Reporter News & Analysis 39 Envtl. L. Rep. News & Analysis, No. 7, July, 2009. European Journal of International Law 20 Eur. J. Int’l L., No. 2, April, 2009. Family Law Quarterly 43 Fam. L.Q., No. 1, Spring, 2009. Georgetown Journal of International Law 40 Geo. J. Int’l L., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics 22 Geo. J. Legal Ethics, No. 2, Spring, 2009. Golden Gate University Law Review 39 Golden Gate U. L. Rev., No. 2, Winter, 2009. Harvard Environmental Law Review 33 Harv. Envtl. L. Rev., No. 2, Pp. 297-608, 2009. International Review of Law and Economics 29 Int’l Rev. L. & Econ., No. 1, March, 2009. Journal of Environmental Law and Litigation 24 J. Envtl. L. & Litig., No. 1, Pp. 1-201, 2009. Journal of Legislation 34 J. Legis., No. 1, Pp. 1-98, 2008. Journal of Technology Law & Policy 14 J. Tech. L. & Pol’y, No. 1, June, 2009. Labor Lawyer 24 Lab. Law., No. 3, Winter/Spring, 2009. Michigan Journal of International Law 30 Mich. J. Int’l L., No. 3, Spring, 2009. New Criminal Law Review 12 New Crim. L. Rev., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Northern Kentucky Law Review 36 N. Ky. L. Rev., No. 4, Pp. 445-654, 2009. Ohio Northern University Law Review 35 Ohio N.U. L. Rev., No. 2, Pp. 445-886, 2009. Pace Law Review 29 Pace L. Rev., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Quinnipiac Health Law Journal 12 Quinnipiac Health L.J., No. 2, Pp. 209-332, 2008-2009. Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Journal 44 Real Prop. Tr. & Est. L.J., No. 1, Spring, 2009. Rutgers Race and the Law Review 10 Rutgers Race & L. Rev., No. 2, Pp. 441-629, 2009. San Diego Law Review 46 San Diego L. Rev., No. 2, Spring, 2009. Seton Hall Law Review 39 Seton Hall L. Rev., No. 3, Pp. 725-1102, 2009. Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal 18 S. Cal. Interdisc. L.J., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Stanford Environmental Law Journal 28 Stan. Envtl. L.J., No. 3, July, 2009. Tulsa Law Review 44 Tulsa L. Rev., No. 2, Winter, 2008. UMKC Law Review 77 UMKC L. Rev., No. 4, Summer, 2009. Washburn Law Journal 48 Washburn L.J., No. 3, Spring, 2009. Washington University Global Studies Law Review 8 Wash. U. Global Stud. L. Rev., No. 3, Pp.451-617, 2009. Washington University Journal of Law & Policy 29 Wash. U. J.L. & Pol’y, Pp. 1-401, 2009. Washington University Law Review 86 Wash. U. L. Rev., No. 6, Pp. 1273-1521, 2009. William Mitchell Law Review 35 Wm. Mitchell L. Rev., No. 4, Pp. 1235-1609, 2009. Yale Journal of International Law 34 Yale J. Int’l L., No. 2, Summer, 2009. Yale Journal on Regulation 26 Yale J. on Reg., No. 2, Summer, 2009.

1,336 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used cross-sectional time-series data for U.S. counties from 1977 to 1992 to find that allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons deters violent crimes, without increasing accidental deaths.
Abstract: Using cross‐sectional time‐series data for U.S. counties from 1977 to 1992, we find that allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons deters violent crimes, without increasing accidental deaths. If those states without right‐to‐carry concealed gun provisions had adopted them in 1992, county‐ and state‐level data indicate that approximately 1,500 murders would have been avoided yearly. Similarly, we predict that rapes would have declined by over 4,000, robbery by over 11,000, and aggravated assaults by over 60,000. We also find criminals substituting into property crimes involving stealth, where the probability of contact between the criminal and the victim is minimal. Further, higher arrest and conviction rates consistently reduce crime. The estimated annual gain from all remaining states adopting these laws was at least $5.74 billion in 1992. The annual social benefit from an additional concealed handgun permit is as high as $5,000.

776 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: The history of the House of Representatives is surveyed and its structure, current function, and influence on American society are described.
Abstract: Surveys the history of the House of Representatives and describes its structure, current function, and influence on American society.

272 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Task Force found the evidence available from identified studies was insufficient to determine the effectiveness of any of the firearms laws reviewed singly or in combination.

128 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyze how communications networks and social institutions influenced the growth of the antislavery movement in the U.S. from 1790 to 1840, and make three contributions to our understanding of social movement organizations in general and antislaving societies in particular.
Abstract: We analyze how communications networks and social institutions influenced the growth of the antislavery movement in the U.S. from 1790 to 1840. Communications networks fueled by print media transmitted news about the movement to the public and so helped mobilize a broad base of support. Among social institutions, churches were especially supportive because their emphasis on morality and community was conducive to antislavery activism. Our analysis focuses on the founding of antislavery societies, the formal organizations that underpinned this movement, and makes three contributions to our understanding of social movement organizations in general and antislavery societies in particular. First, we show that the impact of mass media was strong as far back as the early nineteenth century and that the growth of magazines spurred antislavery society formation. Second, we demonstrate that theology, specifically an orientation toward this world or heaven, determined whether religious resources were available to a...

79 citations