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Clément Huart

Bio: Clément Huart is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Civilization & Arabic literature. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 8 publications receiving 40 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1903
TL;DR: A chronological study of the history of Arabic literature can be found in this paper, with a brief discourse on geographical and cultural influences on Arabic writers, and touching on the earliest forms of pre-Islamic poetry.
Abstract: This book is a chronological study of the history of Arabic literature. Beginning with a brief discourse on geographical and cultural influences on Arabic writers, and touching on the earliest forms of pre-Islamic poetry, the author continues with a deeper study of the 'golden age' of Arabic literature, when writers and artists flourished under the Omeyyad and Abbasid dynasties. Later chapters are devoted to the medieval period, and a final section looks to the future. First published in 1903, this work remains a standard, concise history of Arabic literature. Its author, Clement Huart, Professor of Oriental Languages in Paris, was one of the most accomplished orientalists of his day, and was a leading authority on Arabic, Persian, Turkish and Romaic literature.

19 citations

Book
20 Mar 1997

13 citations

Book
01 Jan 1914

1 citations


Cited by
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Book
26 Feb 2018
TL;DR: The authors investigates the long-term continuity of large-scale states and empires, and its effect on the Near East's social fabric, including the fundamental changes that occurred to major social institutions.
Abstract: Mark Altaweel Andrea Squitieri R E V O LU T IO N IZ IN G A W O R L D M rk A taw el nd A nrea Sqitieri This book investigates the long-term continuity of large-scale states and empires, and its effect on the Near East’s social fabric, including the fundamental changes that occurred to major social institutions. Its geographical coverage spans, from east to west, modernday Libya and Egypt to Central Asia, and from north to south, Anatolia to southern Arabia, incorporating modern-day Oman and Yemen. Its temporal coverage spans from the late eighth century BCE to the seventh century CE during the rise of Islam and collapse of the Sasanian Empire.

66 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, it was shown that Islam not only allowed but encouraged such operations on a scale which surpassed anything known before, and that the Italian bankers learnt these operations from the Muslim traders of the Muslim world with whom they had long and strong commercial relationships between the 10 th and 12th centuries AD.
Abstract: Banking is often considered by most economists as a modern device of recent origin (12th Century AD Italy), but a glance, at the origin and development of financial operations throughout history, will dispel the notion of novelty as we can see from this paper. The purpose of this paper is: · Firstly, to show that banking operations were practised by almost all known early civilizations, long before 12 th Century AD Italy; · Secondly, to prove that Islam not only allowed but encouraged such operations on a scale which surpassed anything known before; · Thirdly, to show that the Italians bankers learnt these operations from the Muslim, Christian and Jewish traders of the Muslim world with whom they had long and strong commercial relationships between the 10 th and 12th centuries AD; and · Finally, to trace the origin and development of what is known nowadays as 'Islamic banking'.

56 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A number of Arab countries have been exposed to structural adjustment programs under the guidance of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, these programs are aimed at making various kinds of Arab socialist and mixed-economy regimes more “market-friendly,” a policy that started in the 1950s and 1960s in countries like Algeria, Tunisia, Syria, and Egypt as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: A number of Arab countries have been exposed to structural adjustment programs. Under the guidance of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, these programs are aimed at making various kinds of Arab socialist and mixed-economy regimes more “market-friendly,” a policy that started in the 1950s and 1960s in countries like Algeria, Tunisia, Syria, and Egypt. Considering the mounting social tension that results from continuing population growth, urban agglomeration, and unemployment, it would be naive to expect—with Fukuyama—an “end of history” as most countries try to adopt market regimes and to strengthen civil society and parliamentary democracy. As Ibn Khaldun (1332–1406) well knew, economic and social change is a never-ending process. In the search for viable and sustainable strategies it may be stimulating to consider the insights of this great scholar of the Arab world who wrote 600 years ago.IBN KHALDUN'S SOCIAL SYSTEMS THEORYIbn Khaldun was born in Tunis into an influential clan of South Arabian origin with substantial influence in Islamic Spain and, after the fall of Seville in 1248, in north-western Africa. He was exposed to the turmoils of his time. He held his first position in 1352 at the court at Tunis at the age of 20 and then went on to high political, administrative, diplomatic, and judicial posts in the service of various rulers in the Maghrib, Spain, and Egypt.

46 citations

Book
07 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the influence and significance of the four sects of Islam and their followers are discussed. But the authors do not discuss the relation between the four groups. And they do not consider the relation of the three groups.
Abstract: 1. Earlier movements. 'Abd Allah ibn Saba' and his followers. Al-Mukhtar and the Kaisaniyya 2. Bayan ibn Sam'an and the Bayaniyya 3. Al-Mughira ibn Sa'id and the Mughiriyya 4. Abu Mansur Al-'ijli and the Mansuriyya 5. 'Abd Allah ibn Mu'Awiya and the Janahiyya 6. Influence and significance of the four sects Conclusion.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 1924, the doors of the medreses of Turkey were ordered closed by the Grand National Assembly of Turkey as mentioned in this paper, and the century-old movement to modernize and secularize Turkish education reached a crucial watershed with the abandonment of the traditional Islamic system of mektebs and medrees.
Abstract: In 1924 the doors of the medreses of Turkey were ordered closed by the Grand National Assembly. The century-old movement to modernize and secularize Turkish education reached a crucial watershed with the abandonment of the traditional Islamic system of mektebs and medreses. The bifurcation which had characterized Ottoman education since the early nineteenth century and which had been reflected in the empire's educated elite could not be tolerated in the new, secular republic envisaged by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

20 citations