scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Clifford Stein

Bio: Clifford Stein is an academic researcher from Columbia University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Approximation algorithm & Scheduling (computing). The author has an hindex of 38, co-authored 133 publications receiving 10876 citations. Previous affiliations of Clifford Stein include Massachusetts Institute of Technology & Southampton General Hospital.


Papers
More filters
Book
31 Jul 2009
TL;DR: Pseudo-code explanation of the algorithms coupled with proof of their accuracy makes this book a great resource on the basic tools used to analyze the performance of algorithms.
Abstract: If you had to buy just one text on algorithms, Introduction to Algorithms is a magnificent choice. The book begins by considering the mathematical foundations of the analysis of algorithms and maintains this mathematical rigor throughout the work. The tools developed in these opening sections are then applied to sorting, data structures, graphs, and a variety of selected algorithms including computational geometry, string algorithms, parallel models of computation, fast Fourier transforms (FFTs), and more. This book's strength lies in its encyclopedic range, clear exposition, and powerful analysis. Pseudo-code explanation of the algorithms coupled with proof of their accuracy makes this book is a great resource on the basic tools used to analyze the performance of algorithms.

2,972 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The complexity class P is formally defined as the set of concrete decision problems that are polynomial-time solvable, and encodings are used to map abstract problems to concrete problems.
Abstract: problems To understand the class of polynomial-time solvable problems, we must first have a formal notion of what a "problem" is. We define an abstract problem Q to be a binary relation on a set I of problem instances and a set S of problem solutions. For example, an instance for SHORTEST-PATH is a triple consisting of a graph and two vertices. A solution is a sequence of vertices in the graph, with perhaps the empty sequence denoting that no path exists. The problem SHORTEST-PATH itself is the relation that associates each instance of a graph and two vertices with a shortest path in the graph that connects the two vertices. Since shortest paths are not necessarily unique, a given problem instance may have more than one solution. This formulation of an abstract problem is more general than is required for our purposes. As we saw above, the theory of NP-completeness restricts attention to decision problems: those having a yes/no solution. In this case, we can view an abstract decision problem as a function that maps the instance set I to the solution set {0, 1}. For example, a decision problem related to SHORTEST-PATH is the problem PATH that we saw earlier. If i = G, u, v, k is an instance of the decision problem PATH, then PATH(i) = 1 (yes) if a shortest path from u to v has at most k edges, and PATH(i) = 0 (no) otherwise. Many abstract problems are not decision problems, but rather optimization problems, in which some value must be minimized or maximized. As we saw above, however, it is usually a simple matter to recast an optimization problem as a decision problem that is no harder. Encodings If a computer program is to solve an abstract problem, problem instances must be represented in a way that the program understands. An encoding of a set S of abstract objects is a mapping e from S to the set of binary strings. For example, we are all familiar with encoding the natural numbers N = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4,...} as the strings {0, 1, 10, 11, 100,...}. Using this encoding, e(17) = 10001. Anyone who has looked at computer representations of keyboard characters is familiar with either the ASCII or EBCDIC codes. In the ASCII code, the encoding of A is 1000001. Even a compound object can be encoded as a binary string by combining the representations of its constituent parts. Polygons, graphs, functions, ordered pairs, programs-all can be encoded as binary strings. Thus, a computer algorithm that "solves" some abstract decision problem actually takes an encoding of a problem instance as input. We call a problem whose instance set is the set of binary strings a concrete problem. We say that an algorithm solves a concrete problem in time O(T (n)) if, when it is provided a problem instance i of length n = |i|, the algorithm can produce the solution in O(T (n)) time. A concrete problem is polynomial-time solvable, therefore, if there exists an algorithm to solve it in time O(n) for some constant k. We can now formally define the complexity class P as the set of concrete decision problems that are polynomial-time solvable. We can use encodings to map abstract problems to concrete problems. Given an abstract decision problem Q mapping an instance set I to {0, 1}, an encoding e : I → {0, 1}* can be used to induce a related concrete decision problem, which we denote by e(Q). If the solution to an abstract-problem instance i I is Q(i) {0, 1}, then the solution to the concreteproblem instance e(i) {0, 1}* is also Q(i). As a technicality, there may be some binary strings that represent no meaningful abstract-problem instance. For convenience, we shall assume that any such string is mapped arbitrarily to 0. Thus, the concrete problem produces the same solutions as the abstract problem on binary-string instances that represent the encodings of abstract-problem instances. We would like to extend the definition of polynomial-time solvability from concrete problems to abstract problems by using encodings as the bridge, but we would like the definition to be independent of any particular encoding. That is, the efficiency of solving a problem should not depend on how the problem is encoded. Unfortunately, it depends quite heavily on the encoding. For example, suppose that an integer k is to be provided as the sole input to an algorithm, and suppose that the running time of the algorithm is Θ(k). If the integer k is provided in unary-a string of k 1's-then the running time of the algorithm is O(n) on length-n inputs, which is polynomial time. If we use the more natural binary representation of the integer k, however, then the input length is n = ⌊lg k⌋ + 1. In this case, the running time of the algorithm is Θ (k) = Θ(2), which is exponential in the size of the input. Thus, depending on the encoding, the algorithm runs in either polynomial or superpolynomial time. The encoding of an abstract problem is therefore quite important to our under-standing of polynomial time. We cannot really talk about solving an abstract problem without first specifying an encoding. Nevertheless, in practice, if we rule out "expensive" encodings such as unary ones, the actual encoding of a problem makes little difference to whether the problem can be solved in polynomial time. For example, representing integers in base 3 instead of binary has no effect on whether a problem is solvable in polynomial time, since an integer represented in base 3 can be converted to an integer represented in base 2 in polynomial time. We say that a function f : {0, 1}* → {0,1}* is polynomial-time computable if there exists a polynomial-time algorithm A that, given any input x {0, 1}*, produces as output f (x). For some set I of problem instances, we say that two encodings e1 and e2 are polynomially related if there exist two polynomial-time computable functions f12 and f21 such that for any i I , we have f12(e1(i)) = e2(i) and f21(e2(i)) = e1(i). That is, the encoding e2(i) can be computed from the encoding e1(i) by a polynomial-time algorithm, and vice versa. If two encodings e1 and e2 of an abstract problem are polynomially related, whether the problem is polynomial-time solvable or not is independent of which encoding we use, as the following lemma shows. Lemma 34.1 Let Q be an abstract decision problem on an instance set I , and let e1 and e2 be polynomially related encodings on I . Then, e1(Q) P if and only if e2(Q) P. Proof We need only prove the forward direction, since the backward direction is symmetric. Suppose, therefore, that e1(Q) can be solved in time O(nk) for some constant k. Further, suppose that for any problem instance i, the encoding e1(i) can be computed from the encoding e2(i) in time O(n) for some constant c, where n = |e2(i)|. To solve problem e2(Q), on input e2(i), we first compute e1(i) and then run the algorithm for e1(Q) on e1(i). How long does this take? The conversion of encodings takes time O(n), and therefore |e1(i)| = O(n), since the output of a serial computer cannot be longer than its running time. Solving the problem on e1(i) takes time O(|e1(i)|) = O(n), which is polynomial since both c and k are constants. Thus, whether an abstract problem has its instances encoded in binary or base 3 does not affect its "complexity," that is, whether it is polynomial-time solvable or not, but if instances are encoded in unary, its complexity may change. In order to be able to converse in an encoding-independent fashion, we shall generally assume that problem instances are encoded in any reasonable, concise fashion, unless we specifically say otherwise. To be precise, we shall assume that the encoding of an integer is polynomially related to its binary representation, and that the encoding of a finite set is polynomially related to its encoding as a list of its elements, enclosed in braces and separated by commas. (ASCII is one such encoding scheme.) With such a "standard" encoding in hand, we can derive reasonable encodings of other mathematical objects, such as tuples, graphs, and formulas. To denote the standard encoding of an object, we shall enclose the object in angle braces. Thus, G denotes the standard encoding of a graph G. As long as we implicitly use an encoding that is polynomially related to this standard encoding, we can talk directly about abstract problems without reference to any particular encoding, knowing that the choice of encoding has no effect on whether the abstract problem is polynomial-time solvable. Henceforth, we shall generally assume that all problem instances are binary strings encoded using the standard encoding, unless we explicitly specify the contrary. We shall also typically neglect the distinction between abstract and concrete problems. The reader should watch out for problems that arise in practice, however, in which a standard encoding is not obvious and the encoding does make a difference. A formal-language framework One of the convenient aspects of focusing on decision problems is that they make it easy to use the machinery of formal-language theory. It is worthwhile at this point to review some definitions from that theory. An alphabet Σ is a finite set of symbols. A language L over Σ is any set of strings made up of symbols from Σ. For example, if Σ = {0, 1}, the set L = {10, 11, 101, 111, 1011, 1101, 10001,...} is the language of binary representations of prime numbers. We denote the empty string by ε, and the empty language by Ø. The language of all strings over Σ is denoted Σ*. For example, if Σ = {0, 1}, then Σ* = {ε, 0, 1, 00, 01, 10, 11, 000,...} is the set of all binary strings. Every language L over Σ is a subset of Σ*. There are a variety of operations on languages. Set-theoretic operations, such as union and intersection, follow directly from the set-theoretic definitions. We define the complement of L by . The concatenation of two languages L1 and L2 is the language L = {x1x2 : x1 L1 and x2 L2}. The closure or Kleene star of a language L is the language L*= {ε} L L L ···, where Lk is the language obtained by

2,817 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A randomized, strongly polynomial algorithm that finds the minimum cut in an arbitrarily weighted undirected graph with high probability with a significant improvement over the previous time bounds based on maximum flows.
Abstract: This paper present a new approach to finding minimum cuts in undirected graphs. The fundamental principle is simple: the edges in a graph's minimum cut form an extremely small fraction of the graph's edges. Using this idea, we give a randomized, strongly polynomial algorithm that finds the minimum cut in an arbitrarily weighted undirected graph with high probability. The algorithm runs in O(n2log3n) time, a significant improvement over the previous O˜(mn) time bounds based on maximum flows. It is simple and intuitive and uses no complex data structures. Our algorithm can be parallelized to run in RNC with n2 processors; this gives the first proof that the minimum cut problem can be solved in RNC. The algorithm does more than find a single minimum cut; it finds all of them.With minor modifications, our algorithm solves two other problems of interest. Our algorithm finds all cuts with value within a multiplicative factor of a of the minimum cut's in expected O˜(n2a) time, or in RNC with n2a processors. The problem of finding a minimum multiway cut of graph into r pieces is solved in expected O˜(n2(r-1)) time, or in RNC with n2(r-1) processors. The “trace” of the algorithm's execution on these two problems forms a new compact data structure for representing all small cuts and all multiway cuts in a graph. This data structure can be efficiently transformed into the more standard cactus representing for minimum cuts.

510 citations

01 Apr 1997
TL;DR: This work establishes that several well-known on-line algorithms, that have poor performance from an absolute worst-case perspective, are optimal for the problems in question when allowed moderately more resources.
Abstract: We consider two fundamental problems in dynamic scheduling: scheduling to meet deadlines in a preemptive multiprocessor setting, and scheduling to provide good response time in a number of scheduling environments. When viewed from the perspective of traditional worst-case analysis, no good on-line algorithms exist for these problems, and for some variants no good off-line algorithms exist unless {Rho} = {Nu}{Rho}. We study these problems using a relaxed notion of competitive analysis, introduced by Kalyanasundaram and Pruhs, in which the on-line algorithm is allowed more resources than the optimal off-line algorithm to which it is compared. Using this approach, we establish that several well-known on-line algorithms, that have poor performance from an absolute worst-case perspective, are optimal for the problems in question when allowed moderately more resources. For the optimization of average flow time, these are the first results of any sort, for any {Nu}{Rho}-hard version of the problem, that indicate that it might be possible to design good approximation algorithms.

247 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
03 Jan 1991
TL;DR: It is proved that a (simple) k-commodity flow problem can be approximately solved by approximately solving O(k log2n) single-comodity minimum-cost flow problems, and the first polynomial-time combinatorial algorithms for approximately solving the multicommodation flow problem are described.
Abstract: All previously known algorithms for solving the multicommodity flow problem with capacities are based on linear programming. The best of these algorithms uses a fast matrix multiplication algorithm and takes O(k3.5n3m0.5 log(nDU)) time for the multicommodity flow problem with integer demands and at least O(k2.5n2m0.5 log(n��1DU)) time to find an approximate solution, where k is the number of commodities, n and m denote the number of nodes and edges in the network, D is the largest demand, and U is the largest edge capacity. As a consequence, even multicommodity flow problems with just a few commodities are believed to be much harder than single-commodity maximum-flow or minimum-cost flow problems. In this paper, we describe the first polynomial-time combinatorial algorithms for approximately solving the multicommodity flow problem. The running time of our randomized algorithm is (up to log factors) the same as the time needed to solve k single-commodity flow problems, thus giving the surprising result that approximately computing a k-commodity maximum-flow is not much harder than computing about k single-commodity maximum-flows in isolation. In fact, we prove that a (simple) k-commodity flow problem can be approximately solved by approximately solving O(k log2n) single-commodity minimum-cost flow problems. Our k-commodity algorithm runs in O (knm log4n) time with high probability. We also describe a deterministic algorithm that uses an O(k)-factor more time. Given any multicommodity flow problem as input, both algorithms are guaranteed to provide a feasible solution to a modified flow problem in which all capacities are increased by a (1 + �)-factor, or to provide a proof that there is no feasible solution to the original problem. We also describe faster approximation algorithms for multicommodity flow problems with a special structure, such as those that arise in "sparsest cut" problems and uniform concurrent flow problems.

232 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This survey reviews recent trends in video-based human capture and analysis, as well as discussing open problems for future research to achieve automatic visual analysis of human movement.

2,738 citations

Book
03 Sep 2011
TL;DR: The question the authors are trying to ask is: how many units of water can they send from the source to the sink per unit of time?
Abstract: 1 Defining Network Flow A flow network is a directed graph G = (V,E) in which each edge (u, v) ∈ E has non-negative capacity c(u, v) ≥ 0. We require that if (u, v) ∈ E, then (v, u) / ∈ E. That is, if an edge exists, then the edge between the same vertices going the reverse direction does not exist. Every flow network has a source s and a sink t, and we assume that for every v ∈ V , there is some path s→ · · · → v → · · · → t. Note that this implies that flow networks are connected. Informally, the intuition behind network flow is to think of the edges as pipes and the weights on the edges as the capacity its corresponding pipe per unit of time. The question we are trying to ask is: how many units of water can we send from the source to the sink per unit of time? Formally, a flow in G is a function f : V × V → R that satisfies the following: • Capacity constraint. For all u, v ∈ V , we require 0 ≤ f(u, v) ≤ c(u, v). Our pipe cannot hold more than is allowed as dictated by its capacity. • Flow conservation. For u ∈ V − {s, t}, we require ∑

2,426 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a heuristic for the pickup and delivery problem based on an extension of the large neighborhood search heuristic previously suggested for solving the vehicle routing problem with time windows that is very robust and is able to adapt to various instance characteristics.
Abstract: The pickup and delivery problem with time windows is the problem of serving a number of transportation requests using a limited amount of vehicles. Each request involves moving a number of goods from a pickup location to a delivery location. Our task is to construct routes that visit all locations such that corresponding pickups and deliveries are placed on the same route, and such that a pickup is performed before the corresponding delivery. The routes must also satisfy time window and capacity constraints. This paper presents a heuristic for the problem based on an extension of the large neighborhood search heuristic previously suggested for solving the vehicle routing problem with time windows. The proposed heuristic is composed of a number of competing subheuristics that are used with a frequency corresponding to their historic performance. This general framework is denoted adaptive large neighborhood search. The heuristic is tested on more than 350 benchmark instances with up to 500 requests. It is able to improve the best known solutions from the literature for more than 50% of the problems. The computational experiments indicate that it is advantageous to use several competing subheuristics instead of just one. We believe that the proposed heuristic is very robust and is able to adapt to various instance characteristics.

1,685 citations

Book
05 Apr 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present abstract models that capture the cross-layer interaction from the physical to transport layer in wireless network architectures including cellular, ad-hoc and sensor networks as well as hybrid wireless-wireline.
Abstract: Information flow in a telecommunication network is accomplished through the interaction of mechanisms at various design layers with the end goal of supporting the information exchange needs of the applications. In wireless networks in particular, the different layers interact in a nontrivial manner in order to support information transfer. In this text we will present abstract models that capture the cross-layer interaction from the physical to transport layer in wireless network architectures including cellular, ad-hoc and sensor networks as well as hybrid wireless-wireline. The model allows for arbitrary network topologies as well as traffic forwarding modes, including datagrams and virtual circuits. Furthermore the time varying nature of a wireless network, due either to fading channels or to changing connectivity due to mobility, is adequately captured in our model to allow for state dependent network control policies. Quantitative performance measures that capture the quality of service requirements in these systems depending on the supported applications are discussed, including throughput maximization, energy consumption minimization, rate utility function maximization as well as general performance functionals. Cross-layer control algorithms with optimal or suboptimal performance with respect to the above measures are presented and analyzed. A detailed exposition of the related analysis and design techniques is provided.

1,612 citations