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Cornelius M. Dyke

Bio: Cornelius M. Dyke is an academic researcher from University of North Dakota. The author has contributed to research in topics: Bivalirudin & Cardiopulmonary bypass. The author has an hindex of 27, co-authored 61 publications receiving 3330 citations. Previous affiliations of Cornelius M. Dyke include VCU Medical Center & Gaston Memorial Hospital.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The duration of red-cell storage was not associated with significant differences in the change in Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score and the transfusion of red cells stored for 21 days or more among patients 12 years of age or older who were undergoing complex cardiac surgery was not found to be superior.
Abstract: BackgroundSome observational studies have reported that transfusion of red-cell units that have been stored for more than 2 to 3 weeks is associated with serious, even fatal, adverse events. Patients undergoingcardiac surgery may be especially vulnerable to the adverse effects of transfusion. MethodsWe conducted a randomized trial at multiple sites from 2010 to 2014. Participants 12 years of age or older who were undergoing complex cardiac surgery and were likely to undergo transfusion of red cells were randomly assigned to receive leukocyte-reduced red cells stored for 10 days or less (shorter-term storage group) or for 21 days or more (longer-term storage group) for all intraoperative and postoperative transfusions. The primary outcome was the change in Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score (MODS; range, 0 to 24, with higher scores indicating more severe organ dysfunction) from the preoperative score to the highest composite score through day 7 or the time of death or discharge. ResultsThe median storage tim...

409 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
18 Jan 2012-JAMA
TL;DR: Among patients who discontinue thienopyridine therapy prior to cardiac surgery, the use of cangrelor compared with placebo resulted in a higher rate of maintenance of platelet inhibition.
Abstract: Context Thienopyridines are among the most widely prescribed medications, but their use can be complicated by the unanticipated need for surgery. Despite increased risk of thrombosis, guidelines recommend discontinuing thienopyridines 5 to 7 days prior to surgery to minimize bleeding. Objective To evaluate the use of cangrelor, an intravenous, reversible P2Y 12 platelet inhibitor for bridging thienopyridine-treated patients to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Design, Setting, and Patients Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial, involving 210 patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or treated with a coronary stent and receiving a thienopyridine awaiting CABG surgery to receive either cangrelor or placebo after an initial open-label, dose-finding phase (n = 11) conducted between January 2009 and April 2011. Interventions Thienopyridines were stopped and patients were administered cangrelor or placebo for at least 48 hours, which was discontinued 1 to 6 hours before CABG surgery. Main Outcome Measures The primary efficacy end point was platelet reactivity (measured in P2Y 12 reaction units [PRUs]), assessed daily. The main safety end point was excessive CABG surgery–related bleeding. Results The dose of cangrelor determined in 10 patients in the open-label stage was 0.75 μg/kg per minute. In the randomized phase, a greater proportion of patients treated with cangrelor had low levels of platelet reactivity throughout the entire treatment period compared with placebo (primary end point, PRU Conclusions Among patients who discontinue thienopyridine therapy prior to cardiac surgery, the use of cangrelor compared with placebo resulted in a higher rate of maintenance of platelet inhibition. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00767507

356 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Cagalj et al. as discussed by the authors evaluated the use of cangrelor, an intravenous, reversible P2Y(12) platelet inhibitor for bridging thienopyridine-treated patients to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery.
Abstract: CONTEXT Thienopyridines are among the most widely prescribed medications, but their use can be complicated by the unanticipated need for surgery. Despite increased risk of thrombosis, guidelines recommend discontinuing thienopyridines 5 to 7 days prior to surgery to minimize bleeding. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of cangrelor, an intravenous, reversible P2Y(12) platelet inhibitor for bridging thienopyridine-treated patients to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial, involving 210 patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or treated with a coronary stent and receiving a thienopyridine awaiting CABG surgery to receive either cangrelor or placebo after an initial open-label, dose-finding phase (n = 11) conducted between January 2009 and April 2011. Interventions Thienopyridines were stopped and patients were administered cangrelor or placebo for at least 48 hours, which was discontinued 1 to 6 hours before CABG surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary efficacy end point was platelet reactivity (measured in P2Y(12) reaction units [PRUs]), assessed daily. The main safety end point was excessive CABG surgery-related bleeding. RESULTS The dose of cangrelor determined in 10 patients in the open-label stage was 0.75 μg/kg per minute. In the randomized phase, a greater proportion of patients treated with cangrelor had low levels of platelet reactivity throughout the entire treatment period compared with placebo (primary end point, PRU <240; 98.8% (83 of 84) vs 19.0% (16 of 84); relative risk [RR], 5.2 [95% CI, 3.3-8.1] P < .001). Excessive CABG surgery-related bleeding occurred in 11.8% (12 of 102) vs 10.4% (10 of 96) in the cangrelor and placebo groups, respectively (RR, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.5-2.5] P = .763). There were no significant differences in major bleeding prior to CABG surgery, although minor bleeding episodes were numerically higher with cangrelor. CONCLUSIONS Among patients who discontinue thienopyridine therapy prior to cardiac surgery, the use of cangrelor compared with placebo resulted in a higher rate of maintenance of platelet inhibition. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00767507.

345 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The proposed universal definition for perioperative bleeding (UDPB) in adult cardiac surgery provides a precise classification of bleeding that is useful in everyday practice as well as in clinical research.

295 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current investigation expands the experience of safe and effective anticoagulation with bivalirudin during CPB to patients with confirmed or suspected HIT and anti-PF4/H antibodies, including in the setting of impaired renal function.

207 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The once-in-a-lifetime treatment with Abciximab Intracoronary for acute coronary syndrome and a second dose intravenously for atrial fibrillation is recommended for adults with high blood pressure.
Abstract: ACE : angiotensin-converting enzyme ACS : acute coronary syndrome ADP : adenosine diphosphate AF : atrial fibrillation AMI : acute myocardial infarction AV : atrioventricular AIDA-4 : Abciximab Intracoronary vs. intravenously Drug Application APACHE II : Acute Physiology Aand Chronic

7,519 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation are based on the findings of the ESC Task Force on 12 March 2015.
Abstract: ESC Guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation : The Task Force for the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

6,866 citations

01 Mar 2007
TL;DR: An initiative to develop uniform standards for defining and classifying AKI and to establish a forum for multidisciplinary interaction to improve care for patients with or at risk for AKI is described.
Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a complex disorder for which currently there is no accepted definition. Having a uniform standard for diagnosing and classifying AKI would enhance our ability to manage these patients. Future clinical and translational research in AKI will require collaborative networks of investigators drawn from various disciplines, dissemination of information via multidisciplinary joint conferences and publications, and improved translation of knowledge from pre-clinical research. We describe an initiative to develop uniform standards for defining and classifying AKI and to establish a forum for multidisciplinary interaction to improve care for patients with or at risk for AKI. Members representing key societies in critical care and nephrology along with additional experts in adult and pediatric AKI participated in a two day conference in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in September 2005 and were assigned to one of three workgroups. Each group's discussions formed the basis for draft recommendations that were later refined and improved during discussion with the larger group. Dissenting opinions were also noted. The final draft recommendations were circulated to all participants and subsequently agreed upon as the consensus recommendations for this report. Participating societies endorsed the recommendations and agreed to help disseminate the results. The term AKI is proposed to represent the entire spectrum of acute renal failure. Diagnostic criteria for AKI are proposed based on acute alterations in serum creatinine or urine output. A staging system for AKI which reflects quantitative changes in serum creatinine and urine output has been developed. We describe the formation of a multidisciplinary collaborative network focused on AKI. We have proposed uniform standards for diagnosing and classifying AKI which will need to be validated in future studies. The Acute Kidney Injury Network offers a mechanism for proceeding with efforts to improve patient outcomes.

5,467 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2016-Europace
TL;DR: The Task Force for the management of atrial fibrillation of the European Society of Cardiology has been endorsed by the European Stroke Organisation (ESO).
Abstract: The Task Force for the management of atrial fibrillation of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Developed with the special contribution of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the ESC Endorsed by the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)

5,255 citations