scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Curtis Tappenden

Bio: Curtis Tappenden is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Higher education & Reflective practice. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 5 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors support further education and higher education students' critical/reflective awareness and literacy skills through creative writing as relating to multidisciplinary art and design practices, and offer help to develop confidence and greater ownership of learning and participation in dynamic group activities.
Abstract: The following is taken directly from the abstract. This research project, now at the end of its third and evaluative year, primarily seeks to support Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) art and design students' critical/reflective awareness and literacy skills through creative writing as relating to multidisciplinary art and design practices, and offers help to develop confidence and greater ownership of learning and participation in dynamic group activities. Through the undertaking of activities, learners explore the relationship between words and pictures and consider the intersections and boundaries where these art forms cross and meet.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The drawing and writing experiment that I offered at the Centre of Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) conference in Berlin, 2010 is related to my Ph.D. research.
Abstract: The drawing and writing experiment that I offered at the Centre of Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) conference in Berlin, 2010 is related to my Ph.D. research (based at Leeds Metropolitan University). The research centres around what I am calling the lateral or supra-rational sides of designing processes. While the term lateral was originally made popular by de Bono (1967) in his book Lateral Thinking, its association in the research project embraces the kinds of thinking and making connected to ideation, visualization, intuition and other elements of a sphere of practice that are harder to contain and evidence within orthodox Humanities approaches to academic research. Schon (1983) in The Reflective Practitioner, Law on Beyond Method: Mess (2004) and tangentially, in terms of contemplating a network of practice, Lefebvre's Rhythmanalysis (1992) have all further influenced my research. The research project's particular portrait of processes emerged, in a first stage, from interviews with design students, designers/tutors and young designers in Leeds and at the Royal College of Art. The second, more speculative stage of research asks what might happen if such subject matter and such modes of practice are imposed on writing culture. The drawing and writing experiment in Berlin was a hands-on exploration of the theme of Observation.

Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: RefReflective teaching in further and adult education, by Yvonne Hillier, London, Continuum International Publishing Group, 2012, 290 pp., £24.99 (paperback), 3rd edition, ISBN 978-1-4411-7550 2 Just...
Abstract: Reflective teaching in further and adult education, by Yvonne Hillier, London, Continuum International Publishing Group, 2012, 290 pp., £24.99 (paperback), 3rd edition, ISBN 978-1-4411-7550-2 Just ...

33 citations

DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The authors found that very short, tightly-structured essays will foster risk by combining radical format, content demand and writing's esteem, and they also induced a supporting theory that absolutes and variables need careful balance, extending the bisociative notion of mixing tradition with innovation.
Abstract: The promise of the short text: writing risk into visual arts practice In this study I aim to see if writing can enhance visual arts practice. Much UK Quality Assurance Agency and Higher Education visual arts documentation recommends risk, as do many practitioners. I hypothesise that very short, tightly-structured essays will foster risk by combining radical format, content demand and writing’s esteem. I experimented with essays by Foundation visual arts students at Coventry University in 2011. Half the group was assigned a short essay as above, the other half a 1,000-word, conventional essay. Both groups had the same essay topic choices; both were taught in the same way as far as possible; both assignments were individual. Practice-based presentations took place shortly after the essays, and students were advised of potential connections between the tasks. Quantitative data was taken from all essay and presentation grades; qualitative data from essay drafts, questionnaires and interviews with selected 128-word essay students. The grades show the 128-word essay students slightly outperforming the others. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data: provisional meaning, risk, practice parallels and project process. Drafts and questionnaires showed improvisation and keen engagement; interviews (loosely following Bryman’s ‘unstructured’ model) considered content, form, convention, risk and transferability of writing to practice. The main problems students faced when writing the short essays were how to say enough and how to mix tradition with innovation. There was evidence that some students connected the short essay with their practice – but to connect is not necessarily to enhance. The short essays were very diverse, some radically inventive, others less so – yet the study recommends caution when rethinking traditional writing assignments because some students respect traditional writing, and may find the extreme form of the very short essay patronising unless it can promise more. The study’s contribution to knowledge is to promise more by making writing a metaphor for practice and evaluated as such, taking writing beyond mimicking or analysing practice. The study also induced a supporting theory that absolutes and variables need careful balance, extending the bisociative notion of mixing tradition with innovation. The study showed that these short essays could enhance practice by fostering risk, but also that risk is very variable. This questions how such risks are evaluated, and even whether an enforced risk is a risk at all, and not just ingenuity. The thesis has six chapters: Introduction; Literature review; The short story in visual arts practice; The short essay in action; Student responses; Conclusion. Appendices contain three associated papers and all drafts with comments, questionnaires with responses, and full interview transcripts annotated to demonstrate emerging themes and connections to research questions. The study draws on reader-response as a theoretical framework, and is informed by the study of visual arts academic writing, risk-taking in visual arts practice, Koestler’s bisociative understanding of creativity, provisional meaning and the short story. The promise of the short text: writing risk into visual arts practice Simon Bell August 2013 A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the University’s requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using Chickering and Reisser’s (1993) theory of education and identity to understand students’ perspectives on how their experience in an advanced agricultural communications media writing course helped them develop their identity as writers, agricultural communications instructors should focus on teaching students the pathway to the end product.
Abstract: Writing is a complex process students use to interpret assumptions, make meaning, solidify intentions, and convey knowledge. The purpose of this study was to use Chickering and Reisser’s (1993) theory of education and identity to understand students’ perspectives on how their experience in an advanced agricultural communications media writing course helped them develop their identity as writers. At the end of the course, 57 students completed one-page reflections that were analyzed using content analytic induction (Patton, 2002) guided by Chickering and Reisser’s (1993) seven vectors of college student development. Students showed evidence of experiencing growth in each vector and became media writers who could identify themselves as writers even if they did not intend to pursue a writing career. Student-faculty relationships were key factors in writing identity development because students valued the instructor feedback and human connection. The second major assignment was the point at which they either identified themselves as writers or they did not. Perhaps this was because students were immersed in a structured writing process during that time. Students indicated the value is not in the word but in the author’s ability to connect words into a cohesive structure that captures an audience. Based on this study, agricultural communications instructors should focus on teaching students the pathway to the end product and not focus on teaching the end product. More research, therefore, needs to be conducted on what components of the second major writing assignment helped students become more effective writers and helped them develop identity as writers.

5 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jul 2013
TL;DR: The Create Curate Collaborate! (2011-12) project as discussed by the authors was designed to be a collaborative cross-institutional and cross-platform action research project, working with extracurricular creative writing groups at the University for the Creative Arts and Northbrook College Sussex.
Abstract: Create Curate Collaborate! (2011-12) was designed to be a collaborative cross-institutional and cross-platform action research project, working with extracurricular creative writing groups at the University for the Creative Arts and Northbrook College Sussex, to enable practical, on-line engagement between participating groups of students and to support and extend their research abilities and writing skills. The project was a model of connectivity, creating links between two educational institutions and a museum across a range of creative arts disciplines; as well as connections between the tangible and intangible, through the digital medium of Prezi. The online presentation software Prezi provides an infinite canvas, a space where students can collect and curate their creative responses. The experimental charge of students working at separate locations as well as together in the resource rich environment of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, provided a strong framework for research study.