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D. Joy Oetelaar

Bio: D. Joy Oetelaar is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Landscape archaeology & Yesterday. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 3 publications receiving 37 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The landscape of the Blackfoot is a series of named locales linked by paths, movements and narratives as mentioned in this paper, and paths represent the accumulated imprint of countless journeys as people move from place to place conducting their everyday business.
Abstract: The landscape of the Blackfoot is a series of named locales linked by paths, movements and narratives. The places are often outstanding natural features, river crossings, or resource patches perceived as focal points of spiritual energy. Myths and oral traditions explain how these landmarks were created through the actions of Napi who left behind songs, sacred objects, and practices to commemorate his creative acts on earth. This landscape is also created by people through their experience and engagement with the world around them and through their activities and movements on the ground. As reflections of this habitual behavior, paths represent the accumulated imprint of countless journeys as people move from place to place conducting their everyday business. Although created by people, the resultant network of places and paths constrains the patterned movement of groups over the landscape. From this perspective then, the landscape is not only the natural and cultural features of a region but also...

21 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In archeologie, les modeles portant sur les schemes d'etablissement chez les chasseurs-cueilleurs trouvent leurs origines dans les concepts developpes en ecologie.
Abstract: En archeologie, les modeles portant sur les schemes d'etablissement chez les chasseurs-cueilleurs trouvent leurs origines dans les concepts developpes en ecologie. En particulier, la mobilite residentielle, c'est-a-dire le mouvement saisonnier a travers le paysage, est reliee a la structure des ressources de l'environnement. Cependant, les chercheurs en ecologie reconnaissent de plus en plus l'importance de l'histoire, des perturbations et de la contingence dans l'interpretation des collectivites biologiques. De plus, les groupes humains sont reconnus comme des elements integraux de l'ecosysteme et des agents responsables de perturbations, surtout dans le domaine de l'ecologie historique. Malheureusement, la recherche en ecologie historique s'est concentree surtout sur les impacts des pratiques agricoles donnant ainsi l'impression que les autochtones nomades n'ont pas contribue aux perturbations dans l'environnement avant la domestication des plantes et des animaux. Le but de ce travail est de demontrer que les activites des chasseurs-cueilleuls ont contribue au developpement des collectivites biologiques a travers la planete.

13 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the origin of these Indigenous preserves and outline the motivation behind their stewardship, using examples of managed landscapes scattered across southern Alberta, and they provide guidelines for the management practices of tomorrow.
Abstract: Most researchers today acknowledge the impact of Indigenous populations on the supposed ‘natural’ or ‘pristine’ environments encountered by European explorers and naturalists travelling through the interior of North America. However, few are willing to accept the extent of this landscape management, especially in western North America. In fact, Indigenous populations created their own series of ‘parks’ through species-level, community-level and landscape-level management strategies such as the manipulation of plants, the selective harvest and displacement of resources, and the use of controlled burns. The resultant ‘parks’ were scattered across southern Alberta and were the product of disturbance and contingency guided by Indigenous perceptions of the reciprocal relationship between humans and the world around them. Using examples of managed landscapes scattered across southern Alberta, we discuss the origin of these Indigenous preserves and outline the motivation behind their stewardship. The lesson learned from this Indigenous approach to stewardship, we believe, provides guidelines for the management practices of tomorrow.

4 citations


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Journal Article
TL;DR: Sometimes, reading is very boring and it will take long time starting from getting the book and start reading, however, in modern era, you can take the developing technology by utilizing the internet and search for the book that is needed.
Abstract: Sometimes, reading is very boring and it will take long time starting from getting the book and start reading. However, in modern era, you can take the developing technology by utilizing the internet. By internet, you can visit this page and start to search for the book that is needed. Wondering this the last refuge is the one that you need, you can go for downloading. Have you understood how to get it?

68 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reviewed social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in Australia, Canada and the United States after the year 2000 and explored future research needs in the field, centred on the four pillars of emergency management (preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery).
Abstract: This article reviews social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in Australia, Canada and the United States after the year 2000 and explores future research needs in the field. In these three countries, social science research exploring contemporary Indigenous wildfire management has been limited although there have been interesting findings about how Indigenous culture and knowledge influences fire management. Research with Indigenous communities may be limited not because of a lack of interest by social scientists, but rather by obstacles to doing research with Indigenous communities, such as ethical and time concerns. Research needs on Indigenous wildfire management are presented, centred on the four pillars of emergency management (preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery).

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that evidence of emerging sociopolitical complexity is embodied in the hunters' ability to invest extensively on landscape engineering to amass communal bison wealth for consumption, storage, and exchange, and produce and reproduce ritual wealth among individuals and restricted sectors of the group.
Abstract: Studies of hunter-gatherer sociopolitical organization consistently exclude terrestrial big-game hunters—pedestrian bison hunters, in particular—from discussions of emerging complexity. To an important extent, this exclusion stems both from the ethology of bison and its consequences for mobile hunters and from the character of their archaeological record, which lacks conventional indicators of organizational complexity such as high-status burials and long-term storage facilities. However, this record exhibits stone architecture of monumental proportions. We argue that evidence of emerging sociopolitical complexity is embodied in the hunters’ ability to (1) invest extensively on landscape engineering to amass communal bison wealth for consumption, storage, and exchange, and (2) produce and reproduce ritual wealth among individuals and restricted sectors of the group. Through a multiscalar research design that integrates thousands of surface stone features with data recovered from kill site excavation, ethn...

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: By reviewing the literature and analyzing European Upper Paleolithic site distribution and raw material transfer patterns in relation to river catchments, it is shown that the role of prominent rivers varies considerably over time and helps to improve the understanding of dynamic and mutually informed human-environment interactions in the Paleolithic.
Abstract: Large river valleys have long been seen as important factors to shape the mobility, communication, and exchange of Pleistocene hunter-gatherers. However, rivers have been debated as either natural entities people adapt and react to or as cultural and meaningful entities people experience and interpret in different ways. Here, we attempt to integrate both perspectives. Building on theoretical work from various disciplines, we discuss the relationship between biophysical river properties and sociocultural river semantics and suggest that understanding a river’s persona is central to evaluating its role in spatial organization. By reviewing the literature and analyzing European Upper Paleolithic site distribution and raw material transfer patterns in relation to river catchments, we show that the role of prominent rivers varies considerably over time. Both ecological and cultural factors are crucial to explaining these patterns. Whereas the Earlier Upper Paleolithic record displays a general tendency toward conceiving rivers as mobility guidelines, the spatial consolidation process after the colonization of the European mainland is paralleled by a trend of conceptualizing river regimes as frontiers, separating archaeological entities, regional groups, or local networks. The Late Upper Paleolithic Magdalenian, however, is characterized again by a role of rivers as mobility and communication vectors. Tracing changing patterns in the role of certain river regimes through time thus contributes to our growing knowledge of human spatial behavior and helps to improve our understanding of dynamic and mutually informed human-environment interactions in the Paleolithic.

33 citations