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D. M. Gibson

Bio: D. M. Gibson is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Thaliacea. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 30 citations.
Topics: Thaliacea

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provided temporal information on the generation time of Dolio letta gegenbauri and some of the life cycle's components, showing that asexual production per cubic meter by phorozooids with that of nurses should result in rapid colonization of a wide shelf by doliolids.
Abstract: The goal of this study was to provide temporal information on the generation time of Dolio- letta gegenbauri and some of the life cycle's components. At 20°C and ~90 µg C l-1 of ingestible phyto- plankton, D.gegenbauri's life cycle is completed in 20.5 days. Phorozooids ♢ 5 mm produce on average 11.0 gonozooids day-1 over a period of 8-18 days. Utilizing field data on the abundance and size distri- bution of an assemblage of phorozooids and nurses, in conjunction with experimentally obtained rates, indicates that asexual production per cubic meter by phorozooids with that of nurses should result in rapid colonization of a wide shelf by doliolids, as observed during July and August 1981 on the southeastern continental shelf of the USA.

35 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An evaluation of data and published results on abundances of doliolids and salps from ocean margins reveals that a considerable degree of prediction is possible, based upon meteorological and boundary current intrusion dynamics.
Abstract: The occurrence of large patches of gelatinous zooplankton has for decades been considered to be unpredictable. An evaluation of our own data and published results on abundances of doliolids and salps from ocean margins reveals that a considerable degree of prediction is possible, based upon meteorological and boundary current intrusion dynamics.

88 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Large planktonic microphages are focused on as a model of selective mucus feeding because of their important roles in the ocean food web: as bacterivores, prey for higher trophic levels, and exporters of carbon via mucous aggregates, faecal pellets and jelly-falls.
Abstract: Mucous-mesh grazers (pelagic tunicates and thecosome pteropods) are common in oceanic waters and efficiently capture, consume and repackage particles many orders of magnitude smaller than themselves. They feed using an adhesive mucous mesh to capture prey particles from ambient seawater. Historically, their grazing process has been characterized as non-selective, depending only on the size of the prey particle and the pore dimensions of the mesh. The purpose of this review is to reverse this assumption by reviewing recent evidence that shows mucous-mesh feeding can be selective. We focus on large planktonic microphages as a model of selective mucus feeding because of their important roles in the ocean food web: as bacterivores, prey for higher trophic levels, and exporters of carbon via mucous aggregates, faecal pellets and jelly-falls. We identify important functional variations in the filter mechanics and hydrodynamics of different taxa. We review evidence that shows this feeding strategy depends not only on the particle size and dimensions of the mesh pores, but also on particle shape and surface properties, filter mechanics, hydrodynamics and grazer behaviour. As many of these organisms remain critically understudied, we conclude by suggesting priorities for future research.

68 citations

BookDOI
29 Jan 2014
TL;DR: This work provides the most comprehensive overview available of the state of the art in this exciting field of evolutionary research with a focus on nervous systems.
Abstract: The growing success of molecular methods has challenged traditional views of animal evolution and a large number of alternative hypotheses are hotly debated today. For the deep metazoan phylogeny project, data sets of hitherto unmatched quality and quantity were compiled and analysed with innovative bioinformatics tools. The book begins at the base of the tree of life to discuss the origin of animals and early branches of the phylogenetic tree. The following section presents special data sets gained from mitochondrial genomes and from morphology, with a focus on nervous systems. The final section is dedicated to theoretical aspects of data analysis and new bioinformatics tools. The book closes with a unique general discussion of all hypotheses contained in previous chapters. This work provides the most comprehensive overview available of the state of the art in this exciting field of evolutionary research.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using literature data on lifetime egg production and generation time of appendicularians, salps, and doliolids, rmax, the maximum rate of lifetime reproductive fitness, is calculated as a common metric of adaptation to environmental conditions.
Abstract: Phylogeny, life cycles, and life-history adaptations of pelagic tunicates to temperature and food concentration are reviewed. Using literature data on lifetime egg production and generation time of appendicularians, salps, and doliolids, rmax, the maximum rate of lifetime reproductive fitness, is calculated as a common metric of adaptation to environmental conditions. The rmax values are high for all three groups, ranging from 0.1 to 1.9 d, so population doubling times range from 8 h to 1 week. These high values of rmax are attributable primarily to short generation times, ranging from 2 to 50 d. Clearly, pelagic tunicates are adapted to event-scale (i.e. days to weeks) rather than seasonal-scale changes in environmental conditions. Although they are not closely related phylogenetically, all three groups have a unique life-history adaptation promoting high lifetime fitness. Appendicularians have late oocyte selection, salps are viviparous, and doliolids possess a polymorphic asexual phase. There has been little research on hermaphroditic appendicularians, on large oceanic salps, and on doliolids generally. Research is needed on factors regulating generation time, on the heritability of life-history traits, and on ageand size-specific rates of mortality.

66 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proposed that acquiring new stem cell lineages in the larvae may be a preadaptation necessary for the evolution of budding, and hypotheses for changes in stem cell linesages in colonial species are reviewed.

62 citations