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Author

D Villaronga

Bio: D Villaronga is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This article conducted a survey of the broad field of firearms-related magazines and concluded that American gun culture is well-entrenched, and that many gun owners have a very high commitment to gun ownership and the shooting sports.
Abstract: In the past two decades, scholars have begun to examine various aspects of American gun culture. This article is the first scholarly survey of the broad field of firearms-related magazines. Examining the 78 diverse firearms magazines which are published in the United States, the authors conclude that American gun culture is well-entrenched, and that many gun owners have a very high commitment to gun ownership and the shooting sports.

4 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors developed empirical methods to identify variations in elements of gun culture across states and analyzed the prominence of these subcultures between states and over time from 1998 through 2016.
Abstract: We developed empirical methods to identify variations in elements of gun culture across states. Using these methods, we then analyzed the prominence of these subcultures between states and over time from 1998 through 2016. Using state-level data, we conducted a principal component analysis of 11 variables associated with gun-related behaviors and retained only the significant components. We then analyzed the presence of these components over time and across states. Based on the principal component analysis, we identified three cultural variations. Component 1 reflected recreational elements of gun culture. Component 2 represented a self-defense element of gun culture. Component 3 was indicative of a symbolic cultural element centered around the protection of the Second Amendment and insurrectionism. Over time, the recreational cultural element declined in prominence while the self-defense one rose and the Second Amendment advocacy one remained stable. This paper advances the literature on gun culture by demonstrating that: (1) gun culture is not monolithic; (2) there are multiple elements of gun culture that vary substantially between states; (3) over time, the recreational gun subculture has been falling in prominence whereas the self-defense subculture has been rising; and (4) there is another subculture, distinct from the self-defense one, which consists in mobilization around the Second Amendment and was strongest in places where state firearm laws are most extensive.

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper used data from the 2019 National Lawful Use of Guns Survey to segment the gun-owning population into different subcultural categories, and performed a latent class analysis to identify six types of gun ownership.
Abstract: We used data from the 2019 National Lawful Use of Guns Survey to segment the gun-owning population into different subcultural categories. Performing a latent class analysis, we introduce six types ...

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the ways in which American gun owners deploy a particular ethical system in their responses to instances of mass gun violence and argued that anthropology is uniquely situated to provide a better understanding of how this ethical system is produced, thereby allowing us to move beyond the falsely dichotomous terms of the gun control debate.
Abstract: This article examines the ways in which American gun owners deploy a particular ethical system in their responses to instances of mass gun violence. I argue that anthropology is uniquely situated to provide a better understanding of how this ethical system is produced, thereby allowing us to move beyond the falsely dichotomous terms of the gun control debate. Recently returned from a period of fieldwork with a gun rights activist community in San Diego, California, I use ethnographic data to show that owning a firearm brings with it an ethical system that makes the prospect of giving up guns in the aftermath of a mass shooting even less attractive to my informants. Furthermore, this article focuses on what has been called “the problem of evil” by demonstrating how my informants order the world into “good guys” and “bad guys.” This opposition becomes personified into a more general notion of good versus evil, thereby placing particular people in the category of the human and others in the category of the inhuman, or monstrous.

8 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a list of commonly used abbreviations for knowledge-based beliefs: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS, KNOWLEDGMENTS, and TABLES.
Abstract: ................................................................................................... 2 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.................................................................................. 3 LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................ 6 Chapter

2 citations