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Dan Diner

Bio: Dan Diner is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Communism & The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 13 publications receiving 218 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 May 2006
TL;DR: The major essays of Dan Diner, who is widely read and quoted in Germany and Israel, are finally collected in an English edition as discussed by the authors, reflecting the author's belief that the Holocaust transcends traditional patterns of historical understanding and requires an epistemologically distinct approach.
Abstract: The major essays of Dan Diner, who is widely read and quoted in Germany and Israel, are finally collected in an English edition. They reflect the author's belief that the Holocaust transcends traditional patterns of historical understanding and requires an epistemologically distinct approach. One can no longer assume that actors as well as historians are operating in the same conceptual universe, sharing the same criteria of rational discourse. This is particularly true of victims and perpetrators, whose memories shape the distortions of historical narrative in ways often diametrically opposed. The essays are divided into three groups. The first group talks about anti-Semitism in the context of the 1930s and the ideologies that drove the Nazi regime. The second group concentrates on the almost unbelievably different perceptions of the 'Final Solution', with particularly illuminating discussions of the Judenrat, or Jewish council. The third group considers the Holocaust as the subject of narrative and historical memory. Diner focuses above all on perspectives: the very notions of rationality and irrationality are seen to be changeable, depending on who is applying them. And because neither rational nor irrational motives can be universally assigned to participants in the Holocaust, Diner proposes, from the perspective of the victims, the idea of the counter rational. His work is directed toward developing a theory of Holocaust historiography and offers, clearly and coherently, the highest level of reflection on these problems.

42 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In judischen theosophischen und kabbalistischen Vorstellungen von der Antike bis in die Neuzeit, wurde das hebraische Alphabet (Alef-Bet) nicht nur als graphisches Reprasentationssystem der hebraischen Sprache (↗Hebraisch) aufgefasst, sondern galt auch als Trager von symbolischen and metaphysischen Bedeutungen as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In judischen theosophischen und kabbalistischen Vorstellungen von der Antike bis in die Neuzeit wurde das hebraische Alphabet (Alef-Bet) nicht nur als graphisches Reprasentationssystem der hebraischen Sprache (↗Hebraisch) aufgefasst, sondern galt auch als Trager von symbolischen und metaphysischen Bedeutungen. Mit der Heiligkeit (↗Kadosh) der hebraischen Buchstaben korrespondierte die Stellung von Schreibern heiliger Texte in Antike und Mittelalter, aber auch die Entwicklung von Drucklettern (!Buchdruck). Vor dem Hintergrund der Modernisierung wurde in der judischen Literatur und bildenden Kunst das hebraische Alphabet als letzter Ort der go ttlichen Kraft und gelegentlich der judischen Existenz transzendiert.

36 citations

Book
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: The State of the Arab World 11 "Orientalism" and its Adversaries Rifa'ah at-Tahtawi and the Arab Human Development Report Language and Social Lifeworlds Knowledge and Technology Freedom and Prosperity Power and Benefit Military and Politics Mehmed Ali and Gamal Abdel Nasser Ground Rent and Productivity Oil Wealth and Stasis.
Abstract: Preface ix Introduction 1 Chapter 1: KNOWLEDGE AND DEVELOPMENT The State of the Arab World 11 "Orientalism" and Its Adversaries Rifa'ah at-Tahtawi and the Arab Human Development Report Language and Social Lifeworlds Knowledge and Technology Freedom and Prosperity Power and Benefit Military and Politics Mehmed Ali and Gamal Abdel Nasser Ground Rent and Productivity Oil Wealth and Stasis Chapter 2: GEOPOLITICS AND RELIGIOUS ZEAL Radicalization in the Muslim East 38 Between Palestine and Kashmir Cold War and Decolonization England and Russia Gladstone and Disraeli Caliphate and Pan-Islam Kemal Pasha and Enver Pasha Hindus and Muslims Colonialism and Alienation Arabism and Islamism Mawdudi and Sayyid Qutb Political Th eology and Civil War Chapter 3: TEXT AND SPEECH The Rejection of the Printing Press 69 One God, One Book Mechanical Reproduction and Profanation Consonants and Vowels Arabic and Hebrew Baruch Spinoza and Walter Benjamin Romanization and Secularization Recitation and Reading Literacy and Diglossia Fusha and Ammiya Chapter 4: RISE AND DECLINE Ottoman Perplexities in the Early Modern Period 96 Europe and Asia Ottomans and the New World Gold and Silver Piri Reis and Selim I Mamluks and Venetians ThePrice Revolution and Mercantilism Janissaries and Bureaucrats Merchants and Craftsmen Inflation and Rebellion Stasis or Crisis Mustafa Ali and Katip Celebi Chapter 5: POLITICAL POWER AND ECONOMIC BENEFIT Muslim Social Environment in the Classical Age 126 Desert and Steppe Tribute and Tax Central Power and Urban Culture Umayyads and Abbasids Mercenaries and Traders Polis and Medina "Public" and "Private" Benefices and Capital Labor and Property Time and Liturgy Ethics and Morals Sacred and Profane Chapter 6: HISTORICAL THOUGHT AND DIVINE LAW Converting Sacred into Profane Time 153 Acceleration or Deceleration Law and History Cyclical versus Linear Time Ibn Khaldun and Giambattista Vico Past Utopias and Future Worlds Islam and Judaism Leo Strauss and Moses Maimonides Dual Law and Dual Time Muhammad Asad and Moses Mendelssohn Law of the Land and Secularization Notes 181 Index of Proper Names 211

26 citations

Book
20 Nov 2007
TL;DR: Dan Diner as mentioned in this paper views the last century as a universal civil war between a succession of conflicting dualisms such as freedom and equality, race and class, capitalism and communism, liberalism and fascism, East and West.
Abstract: "Cataclysms" is a profoundly original look at the last century. Approaching twentieth-century history from the periphery rather than the centers of decision-making, the virtual narrator sits perched on the legendary stairs of Odessa and watches as events between the Baltic and the Aegean pass in review, unfolding in space and time between 1917 and 1989, while evoking the nineteenth century as an interpretative backdrop. Influenced by continental historical, legal, and social thought, Dan Diner views the totality of world history evolving from an Eastern and Southeastern European angle. A work of great synthesis, "Cataclysms" chronicles twentieth century history as "universal civil war" between a succession of conflicting dualisms such as freedom and equality, race and class, capitalism and communism, liberalism and fascism, East and West. Diner's interpretation rotates around cataclysmic events in the transformation from multinational empires into nation states, accompanied by social revolution and "ethnic cleansing," situating the Holocaust at the core of the century's predicament. Unlike other Eurocentric interpretations of the last century, Diner also highlights the emerging pivotal importance of the United States and the impact of decolonization on the process of European integration.

24 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors analyzes the distinctive forms that collective memories take in the age of globalization, and studies the transition from national to cosmopolitan memory cultures in the cross-culture memory transfer process.
Abstract: This article analyzes the distinctive forms that collective memories take in the age of globalization. It studies the transition from national to cosmopolitan memory cultures. Cosmopolitanism refer...

416 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The following is simultaneously an essay in sociological theory, in cultural sociology, and in the empirical reconstruction of postwar Western history as discussed by the authors ; it introduces and specifies a modi cation for the reconstruction of post-war Western history.
Abstract: The following is simultaneously an essay in sociological theory, in cultural sociology, and in the empirical reconstruction of postwar Western history. Per theory, it introduces and specifies a mod...

368 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Hobsbawm traced the transformation of European life between 1789 and 1848 by the dual revolutions -the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution -and the values developed which, taken together, made up the age of capital.
Abstract: In \"The Age of Revolution\", Eric Hobsbawm traced the transformation of European life between 1789 and 1848 by the \"Dual Revolution\" - the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. In the years that followed the values developed which, taken together, made up the age of capital. In this history of the years 1848-1875, he continues his analysis of the rise of industrial capitalism and the consolidation of bougeois culture. The extension of capitalist economy to the four corners of the globe, the mounting concentration of wealth, the migration of men, the domination of Europe and European culture made the third quarter of the 19th century a watershed. This is a history not only of Europe, but of the world. Hobsbawm's intention is not to summarize facts, but to draw facts together into an historical synthesis, to \"make sense of\" the period, and to trace the roots of the present world back to it.

364 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Fukuyama's seminal work "The End of History and the Last Man" as discussed by the authors was the first book to offer a picture of what the new century would look like, outlining the challenges and problems to face modern liberal democracies, and speculated what was going to come next.
Abstract: 20th anniversary edition of "The End of History and the Last Man", a landmark of political philosophy by Francis Fukuyama, author of "The Origins of Political Order". With the fall of Berlin Wall in 1989 the threat of the Cold War which had dominated the second half of the twentieth century vanished. And with it the West looked to the future with optimism but renewed uncertainty. "The End of History and the Last Man" was the first book to offer a picture of what the new century would look like. Boldly outlining the challenges and problems to face modern liberal democracies, Frances Fukuyama examined what had just happened and then speculated what was going to come next. Tackling religious fundamentalism, politics, scientific progress, ethical codes and war, "The End of History and the Last Man" remains a compelling work to this day, provoking argument and debate among its readers. "Awesome ...a landmark ...profoundly realistic and important ...supremely timely and cogent ...the first book to fully fathom the depth and range of the changes now sweeping through the world." (George Gilder, "The Washington"). Post Francis Fukuyama was born in Chicago in 1952. His work includes "America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy" and "After the Neo Cons: Where the Right went Wrong". He now lives in Washington D.C. with his wife and children, where he also works as a part time photographer.

235 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The conceptual framework of multiple secularities was proposed by as discussed by the authors to refocus sociological research on religion and secularity with a view to refocusing sociological studies on the relationship between religion and non-religion.
Abstract: For more than two decades sociological debates over religion and secularization have been characterized by a confrontation between (often American) critics and (mostly European) defenders of secularization theories. At the same time, there was a remarkable rise in public debates about the role of secularism in political regimes and in national as well as civilizational frameworks. Against this backdrop this paper presents the conceptual framework of “multiple secularities” with a view to refocusing sociological research on religion and secularity. We will demonstrate that it can stimulate new ways of theorizing the relationship of religion and secularity in a variety of modern environments. Arguing for a reformulation of this relationship within the framework of cultural sociology, we conceptualize “secularity” in terms of the cultural meanings underlying the differentiation between religion and non-religious spheres. Building on Max Weber we distinguish four basic ideal-types of secularity that are related to specific reference problems and associated with specific guiding ideas. Finally, we illustrate the use of the concept with regard to selected case-studies.

155 citations