scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Dana L. Miller

Bio: Dana L. Miller is an academic researcher from Doane College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Qualitative research & Outdoor education. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 5 publications receiving 7627 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the importance of good qualitative data to improve Eduational practice, and propose a method to determine validity in qualitative inquiry in the context of theory into practice.
Abstract: (2000). Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry. Theory Into Practice: Vol. 39, Getting Good Qualitative Data to Improve Eduational Practice, pp. 124-130.

8,399 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Dana L. Miller1
TL;DR: This article explored preschool and kindergarteners' learning when they were engaged in hands-on activities in the garden and greenhouse areas of a model outdoor classroom and found that when young children are participating in gardening and greenhouse activities they are: (1) communicating their knowledge about the world to others, (2) conveying (and learning to process and manage) emotions, and (3) developing important skills that will help them to be more successful in school and better navigate the world.
Abstract: Using teachers as co-researchers to collect and analyze data, this case study explored preschool and kindergarteners' learning when they were engaged in hands-on activities in the garden and greenhouse areas of a model outdoor classroom. Key findings suggest that when young children are participating in garden and greenhouse activities they are: (1) communicating their knowledge about the world to others, (2) conveying (and learning to process and manage) emotions, and (3) developing important skills (e.g., initiative, self-confidence, literacy, math, science skills) that will help them be more successful in school and better navigate the world.

79 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors describe the experiences of reentry women in psychology doctoral programs at a major Midwestern research university and illustrate the usefulness of the qualitative case-study method in exploring women's experiences.
Abstract: This multiple case study describes the experiences of reentry women in psychology doctoral programs at a major Midwestern research university and illustrates the usefulness of the qualitative case-study method in exploring women's experiences. Semistructured interviews were conducted with four women who were purposefully selected as information-rich participants. Observations and informal interviews were also conducted over a period of up to 2 1/2 years. Eight themes emerged from the data and have been labeled: the decision to return, expectations versus reality, measuring up, frustrations and difficulties, changing family relationships, the necessity of organization, “do it and get on with life,” and rewards. This article illustrates that case-study research can be a powerful tool for feminist researchers to document women's experiences.

41 citations

Dana L. Miller1
01 Mar 1997
TL;DR: Miller et al. as mentioned in this paper presented a strategy for assessing the trustworthiness of qualitative research at the 1997 AEA Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, March 24-28, 1997).
Abstract: AUTHOR Miller, Dana L. TITLE One Strategy for Assessing the Trustworthiness of Qualitative Research: Operationalizing the External Audit. PUB DATE 1997-03-00 NOTE 50p.; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, March 24-28, 1997). PUB TYPE Reports Evaluative (142) Speeches/Meeting Papers (150) EDRS PRICE MF01/PCO2 Plus Postage. DESCRIPTORS College Faculty; *Data Analysis; Data Collection; *Graduate Students; Graduate Study; Higher Education; *Qualitative Research; *Research Methodology; Research Reports; Synthesis; Test Construction; *Validity IDENTIFIERS Audit Trails; *Research Quality

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A model of how youth experience smoking cessation attempts is developed and it is found that only emotionally compelling and inescapable quit reasons were truly motivating.
Abstract: In this study we develop a model of how youth experience smoking cessation attempts. We followed 15 adolescent smokers twice monthly over three months. Through six semistructured interviews, we explored participants' subjective experiences of making a “quit” attempt. We analyzed transcript data using grounded theory procedures, beginning with open coding, axial coding, construction of matrices, and development of a preliminary theory or model of this phenomenon. We found that only emotionally compelling and inescapable quit reasons were truly motivating. Few parents actively supported their child during quit attempts; smoking friends and other peers undermined them. All successful quitters established new, nonsmoking friends and completely redefined themselves. The quit experience was physically uncomfortable, emotionally distressful, and socially isolating. Greater motivation, mature problem-solving skills, and a willingness to supplant their smoking friends characterized successful quitters. Further res...

19 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of reliability and validity are common in quantitative research and now it is reconsidered in the qualitative research paradigm as discussed by the authors, which can also illuminate some ways to test or maximize the validity and reliability of a qualitative study.
Abstract: The use of reliability and validity are common in quantitative research and now it is reconsidered in the qualitative research paradigm. Since reliability and validity are rooted in positivist perspective then they should be redefined for their use in a naturalistic approach. Like reliability and validity as used in quantitative research are providing springboard to examine what these two terms mean in the qualitative research paradigm, triangulation as used in quantitative research to test the reliability and validity can also illuminate some ways to test or maximize the validity and reliability of a qualitative study. Therefore, reliability, validity and triangulation, if they are relevant research concepts, particularly from a qualitative point of view, have to be redefined in order to reflect the multiple ways of establishing truth. Key words: Reliability, Validity, Triangulation, Construct, Qualitative, and Quantitative This article discusses the use of reliability and validity in the qualitative research paradigm. First, the meanings of quantitative and qualitative research are discussed. Secondly, reliability and validity as used in quantitative research are discussed as a way of providing a springboard to examining what these two terms mean and how they can be tested in the qualitative research paradigm. This paper concludes by drawing upon the use of triangulation in the two paradigms (quantitative and qualitative) to show how the changes have influenced our understanding of reliability, validity and triangulation in qualitative studies.

6,438 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a model for quality in qualitative research that is uniquely expansive, yet flexible, in that it makes distinc- tions among qualitative research's means (methods and practices) and its ends.
Abstract: This article presents a model for quality in qualitative research that is uniquely expansive, yet flexible, in that it makes distinc- tions among qualitative research's means (methods and practices) and its ends. The article first provides a contextualization and rationale for the conceptualization. Then the author presents and explores eight key markers of quality in qualitative research including (a) worthy topic, (b) rich rigor, (c) sincerity, (d) credibility, (e) resonance, (f) significant contribution, (g) ethics, and (h) meaningful coherence. This eight-point conceptualization offers a useful pedagogical model and provides a common language of qualitative best practices that can be recognized as integral by a variety of audiences. While making a case for these markers of quality, the article leaves space for dialogue, imagination, growth, and improvisation.

4,656 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provided a detailed discussion about five qualitative approaches (i.e., narrative research, case study research, grounded theory, phenomenology, and participatory action research) as alternative qualitative procedures useful in understanding test interpretation.
Abstract: Counseling psychologists face many approaches from which to choose when they conduct a qualitative research study. This article focuses on the processes of selecting, contrasting, and implementing five different qualitative approaches. Based on an extended example related to test interpretation by counselors, clients, and communities, this article provides a detailed discussion about five qualitative approaches— narrative research; case study research; grounded theory; phenomenology; and participatory action research—as alternative qualitative procedures useful in understanding test interpretation. For each approach, the authors offer perspectives about historical origins, definition, variants, and the procedures of research.

2,409 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The article provides a methodological overview of priority, implementation, and mixing in the sequential explanatory design and offers some practical guidance in addressing those issues.
Abstract: This article discusses some procedural issues related to the mixed-methods sequential explanatory design, which implies collecting and analyzing quantitative and then qualitative data in two consecutive phases within one study. Such issues include deciding on the priority or weight given to the quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis in the study, the sequence of the data collection and analysis, and the stage/stages in the research process at which the quantitative and qualitative data are connected and the results are integrated. The article provides a methodological overview of priority, implementation, and mixing in the sequential explanatory design and offers some practical guidance in addressing those issues. It also outlines the steps for graphically representing the procedures in a mixed-methods study. A mixed-methods sequential explanatory study of doctoral students’ persistence in a distance-learning program in educational leadership is used to illustrate the methodological dis...

2,123 citations