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Daniel B. Vickerman

Bio: Daniel B. Vickerman is an academic researcher from University of California, Riverside. The author has contributed to research in topics: Dry weight & Beet armyworm. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 34 citations.

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TL;DR: Alfalfa with high Se-treatment levels is resistant to S. exigua, and may serve as a population “sink,” where females oviposit and few offspring survive to reproduce.
Abstract: We examined the effect of irrigating alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) with selenium- contaminated water on the oviposition response, larval feeding preference, development and survival of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua Hubner, a generalist herbivore. Alfalfa was grown in sand cultures under three levels of sodium selenate irrigation: (1) control with no Se added; (2) a low rate of 0.0066 g sodium selenate/60 liters water; (3) and a high rate of 0.20 g sodium selenate/60 liters water. The low concentration treatment resulted in 2.88 0.52 g Se/g plant dry weight and did not affect percent survival to adult eclosion compared with the control at 1.26 0.11 g Se/g dry weight. The high rate generated 305.81 52.14g Se/g dry weight of alfalfa and signiÞcantly fewer insects survived compared with insects fed control alfalfa at 1.11 0.12 g Se/g dry weight. High Se levels, but not low levels, decreased the relative growth index for larvae. In two-choice bioassays (treated/control) neonate larvae did not discriminate between control and Se-treated plants at high or low levels. Fourth instars did not discriminate between plants with low Se levels and control plants, but preferred to consume plants with high, usually lethal concentrations of Se. Females preferred ovipositing on plants with low Se concentrations over control plants, but did not discriminate between plants with high Se levels and untreated controls. This indicates that although females and late instars may be able to differentiate between Se-treated and control alfalfa they do not avoid plants containing high con- centrations of Se. Thus, alfalfa with high Se-treatment levels is resistant to S. exigua, and may serve as a population "sink," where females oviposit and few offspring survive to reproduce.

37 citations


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Robert S. Boyd1
TL;DR: Investigation of this “joint effects hypothesis,” using Ni and secondary plant compounds in artificial insect diet, has demonstrated joint effects and suggests that defensive effects of elements in plants are more widespread than previously believed.
Abstract: Elemental hyperaccumulation may have several functions, including plant defense against natural enemies. A total of 34 studies, including 72 experimental tests, have been conducted to date. At least some tests have demonstrated defense by hyperaccumulated As, Cd, Ni, Se and Zn, but relatively few plant taxa and natural enemies have been investigated. Defense by hyperaccumulated Ni has been shown for most leaf/root chewing herbivores and pathogens tested (20 of 26 tests) but not for herbivores of other feeding modes (1 of 8 tests). Most tests (5 of 6) using Ni concentrations below accumulator levels found no defensive effect, and the single test using plants in the accumulator range also found no effect. For Zn, mixed results have been reported for both hyperaccumulator (3 of 6 tests showed defense) and accumulator levels (3 of 4 tests showed defense). These tests have focused exclusively on leaf chewing/scraping herbivores: no herbivores of other feeding modes, or pathogens, have been tested. Both hyperaccumulator and accumulator concentrations of Se generally have shown defensive effects (12 of 14 tests). Most (75%) of these positive results used plants with accumulator Se concentrations. The three tests of Cd showed defensive effects in two cases, one for hyperaccumulator and one for sub-accumulator Cd concentrations. Arsenic has been tested only once, and was found effective against a leaf-chewing herbivore at a concentration much less than the hyperaccumulator level. Defense studies have used a variety of experimental approaches, including choice and no-choice experiments as well as experiments that use artificial diet or growth media. Investigations of hyperaccumulation as a defense against natural enemies have led to two emerging questions. First, what is the minimum concentration of an element sufficient for defense? Evidence suggests that plants other than hyperaccumulators (such as accumulators) may be defended by elements against some natural enemies. Second, do the effects of an element combine with the effects of organic defensive compounds in plants to produce enhanced joint defensive effects? Recent investigation of this “joint effects hypothesis,” using Ni and secondary plant compounds in artificial insect diet, has demonstrated joint effects. Initial answers to both these questions suggest that defensive effects of elements in plants are more widespread than previously believed. These results also suggest an evolutionary pathway by which elemental hyperaccumulation may have evolved from accumulation. In this “defensive enhancement” scenario, defensive benefits of elevated levels of elements may have led to stepwise increases in element concentrations that further magnified these benefits. This series of steps could have led to increased accumulation, and ultimately hyperaccumulation, of elements by plants.

308 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Metal hyperaccumulation protects plants from herbivory resulting from deterrence and toxicity against a wide range of herbivores, and the combination of metals exacerbates toxicity through joint effects and enhances elemental defence.
Abstract: Summary Extraordinarily high leaf metal concentrations in metal hyperaccumulator plants may serve as an elemental defence against herbivores. However, mixed results have been reported and studies using comparative approaches are missing. We investigated the deterrent and toxic potential of metals employing the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri. Effects of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) on the preferences of three Brassicaceae specialists were tested in paired-choice experiments using differently treated plant material, including transgenic plants. In performance tests, we determined the toxicity and joint effects of both metals incorporated in an artificial diet on the survival of a generalist. Feeding by all specialists was significantly reduced by metal concentrations from above 1000 μg Zn g−1 DW and 18 μg Cd g−1 DW. By contrast, metals did not affect oviposition. Generalist survival decreased with increasing concentrations of individual metals, whereby the combination of Zn and Cd had an additive toxic effect even at the lowest applied concentrations of 100 μg Zn g−1 and 2 μg Cd g−1. Metal hyperaccumulation protects plants from herbivory resulting from deterrence and toxicity against a wide range of herbivores. The combination of metals exacerbates toxicity through joint effects and enhances elemental defence. Thus, metal hyperaccumulation is ecologically beneficial for plants.

107 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that understanding how insect behavior is modified is necessary to assess the full scope and importance of metal and metalloid contamination, and that impaired behaviors result in a general reduction in population sizes and species diversity at contaminated sites.
Abstract: In toxicology studies, the use of death as an endpoint often fails to capture the effects a pollutant has on disruptions of ecosystem services by changing an animal’s behavior. Many toxicants can cause population extinctions of insect species at concentrations well below the EC25, EC50, or EC90 concentrations traditionally reported from short-term bioassays. A surprising number of species cannot detect metal and metalloid contamination, and do not always avoid food with significant metal concentrations. This frequently leads to modified ingestion, locomotor, and reproductive behaviors. For example, some species show a tendency to increase locomotor behaviors to escape from locations with elevated metal pollution, whereas other insects greatly decrease all movements unrelated to feeding. Still others exhibit behaviors resulting in increased susceptibility to predation, including a positive phototaxis causing immatures to move to exposed positions. For purposes of reproduction, the inability to avoid even moderately polluted sites when ovipositing can lead to egg loss and reduced fitness of offspring. Ultimately, impaired behaviors result in a general reduction in population sizes and species diversity at contaminated sites, the exceptions being those species tolerating contamination that become dominant. Regardless, ecosystem services, such as herbivory, detritus reduction, or food production for higher trophic levels, are disrupted. This review evaluates the effects of metal and metalloid pollution on insect behaviors in both terrestrial and aquatic systems reported in a diverse literature scattered across many scientific disciplines. Behaviors are grouped by ingestion, taxis, and oviposition. We conclude that understanding how insect behavior is modified is necessary to assess the full scope and importance of metal and metalloid contamination.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Accumulation of metals in leaves and flowers suggests that herbivores and pollinators visiting and foraging on these tissues may be exposed to these potentially toxic compounds.
Abstract: Several studies have found high levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb) in honey bee hives located near urbanized or industrial areas. Insect herbivores and pollinators may come in contact with environmental contaminants in the leaves and flowers they forage upon in these areas. Our study quantified which of these metals are accumulated in the tissues of a common weedy plant that can serve as a route of exposure for insects. We grew Raphanus sativus (crop radish) in semi-hydroponic sand culture in the greenhouse. Plants were irrigated with nutrient solutions containing Cd, Cu, or Pb at four concentrations (control, low, medium, high). Plant performance, floral traits, and metal accumulation were measured in various vegetative and reproductive plant organs. Floral traits and flower number were unaffected by all metal treatments. Copper accumulated at the highest concentrations in flowers compared to the other two metals. Copper and Cd had the highest translocation indices, as well as higher bioconcentration factors compared to Pb, which was mostly immobile in the plant. Copper posed the highest risk due to its high mobility within the plant. In particular, accumulation of metals in leaves and flowers suggests that herbivores and pollinators visiting and foraging on these tissues may be exposed to these potentially toxic compounds.

85 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
13 Apr 2012-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: This study has shown that bees fed selenate were less responsive to sucrose, which may lead to a reduction in incoming floral resources needed to support coworkers and larvae in the field, and reductions in population numbers may occur due to direct toxicity.
Abstract: We know very little about how soil-borne pollutants such as selenium (Se) can impact pollinators, even though Se has contaminated soils and plants in areas where insect pollination can be critical to the functioning of both agricultural and natural ecosystems. Se can be biotransferred throughout the food web, but few studies have examined its effects on the insects that feed on Se-accumulating plants, particularly pollinators. In laboratory bioassays, we used proboscis extension reflex (PER) and taste perception to determine if the presence of Se affected the gustatory response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L., Hymenoptera: Apidae) foragers. Antennae and proboscises were stimulated with both organic (selenomethionine) and inorganic (selenate) forms of Se that commonly occur in Se-accumulating plants. Methionine was also tested. Each compound was dissolved in 1 M sucrose at 5 concentrations, with sucrose alone as a control. Antennal stimulation with selenomethionine and methionine reduced PER at higher concentrations. Selenate did not reduce gustatory behaviors. Two hours after being fed the treatments, bees were tested for sucrose response threshold. Bees fed selenate responded less to sucrose stimulation. Mortality was higher in bees chronically dosed with selenate compared with a single dose. Selenomethionine did not increase mortality except at the highest concentration. Methionine did not significantly impact survival. Our study has shown that bees fed selenate were less responsive to sucrose, which may lead to a reduction in incoming floral resources needed to support coworkers and larvae in the field. If honey bees forage on nectar containing Se (particularly selenate), reductions in population numbers may occur due to direct toxicity. Given that honey bees are willing to consume food resources containing Se and may not avoid Se compounds in the plant tissues on which they are foraging, they may suffer similar adverse effects as seen in other insect guilds.

81 citations