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Danielle Schor

Bio: Danielle Schor is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Packaging and labeling & Nutrition facts label. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 24 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mounting interest and activity globally have been seen in developing comprehensive mechanisms to provide consumers with information about the nutritional quality of foods and beverages at the point of purchase, either on product packaging or shelf tags in retail settings, also known as front-of-pack nutrition labeling systems.
Abstract: In this day and age, American consumers are more interested in health and nutrition than ever before, and with our technologically advanced world, nutrition information from a wide variety of sources is increasingly available. According to the 2009 International Food Information Council Foundation Food & Health Survey, 67% of consumers agree that reading or hearing about the relationship between food and health is of interest, but 42% also agree that food and health information is confusing and conflicting. As a result, for many health and nutrition experts, the process of developing science-based dietary recommendations that are clear to consumers is top of mind. Experts increasingly recognize that having good tools to help consumers apply dietary guidance is as important as the recommendations themselves. The US government is currently updating nutrition recommendations through the development of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. It is also looking at how to most effectively use consumer tools, including the Nutrition Facts panel (NFP), to present recommendations to the public and is interested in the role that nutrition symbols play in consumers' dietary choices. Consumers report using many aspects of information on food packages when making purchase decisions, including the NFP, and they are most likely to report consulting it when purchasing a product for the first time. However, ethnographic research shows that consumers do not actually use the NFP as frequently as they report doing so but are more likely to use it when, among other factors, nutrition information is present on the front of the package. Still, understanding and applying nutrition information, particularly to evaluate the nutrient content of individual foods and beverages in the context of a daily diet, seem to be lacking. Mounting interest and activity globally have been seen in developing comprehensive mechanisms to provide consumers with information about the nutritional quality of foods and beverages at the point of purchase, either on product packaging or shelf tags in retail settings, also known as front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition labeling systems. Several types of FOP systems have emerged: • Fact-based systems provide FOP information that brings to the front panel information that is provided in the NFP. • Better-for-you systems use symbols to indicate how a product ranks against a defined set of nutritional criteria. • Graded better-for-you systems also use symbols, but with indicators to convey good, better, and best nutritional quality. • Numerical rating systems use numbers to rank the overall nutritional quality of a food or beverage. • Color-coded systems use colors to provide at-a-glance information about the levels of individual nutrients in a food or beverage. There are a variety of approaches with respect to communicating nutritional quality and nutrient quantity. The US Food and Drug Administration is devoting increased attention to the use of FOP labeling and will play a large role in shaping the future of this approach. Options must be carefully thought out and thoroughly tested with consumers to maximize effectiveness and usefulness in maintaining overall diet quality over time and, ultimately, positively impacting health. In addition, it is imperative that appropriate education accompany any programs developed for the public

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Food Safety and Inspection Service regulates the labeling of meat and poultry products, while the Food and Drug Administration regulates labeling for all other foods.
Abstract: The Food Safety and Inspection Service regulates the labeling of meat and poultry products, while the Food and Drug Administration regulates labeling for all other foods. Since 1973, FSIS has required nutrition information on labels when nutrition related claims are made.

3 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: These results are consistent with reports of effects of diets high in n-3 fatty acids on other protozoan parasites which suggest that the state of oxidative stress induced by these diets in the cells of both host and parasites is responsible for their parasitic actions.

195 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The literature in the consumer domain of FOP nutrition labeling is critically reviewed in order to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of this form of nutrition education from a consumer perspective.
Abstract: Nutrition-related diseases, such as some cancers, heart diseases, and obesity, belong to the most challenging health concerns of our time. Communicating intuitive and simple nutrition information by means of front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition profile signpost labeling is increasingly seen as an essential tool in efforts to combat unhealthy food choices and improve public health. Consequently, much attention in policy and research is given to nutrient profiling methods and the determination of optimal nutrition criteria. Although consumer research on nutrition signpost labeling is now gradually appearing in the literature, the value and meaning of these labeling systems for consumers have received less attention. In the current debate a concise overview is lacking of the consumer perspective, including relevant psychological phenomena, in relation to much debated controversies surrounding these labels and their further development, such as the most effective type of signpost labeling system and varying stakeholder interests. Therefore, this paper aims to critically review the literature in the consumer domain of FOP nutrition labeling in order to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of this form of nutrition education from a consumer perspective.

168 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2012-Appetite
TL;DR: It is suggested that calories per serving information on FOP labels can increase knowledge, but the SC symbol had little impact on behavior.

94 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 May 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors report on the results of a series of interviews and surveys with privacy and security experts, as well as consumers, where they explore and test the design space of the content to include on an IoT privacy-and security label.
Abstract: Information about the privacy and security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices is not readily available to consumers who want to consider it before making purchase decisions. While legislators have proposed adding succinct, consumer accessible, labels, they do not provide guidance on the content of these labels. In this paper, we report on the results of a series of interviews and surveys with privacy and security experts, as well as consumers, where we explore and test the design space of the content to include on an IoT privacy and security label. We conduct an expert elicitation study by following a three-round Delphi process with 22 privacy and security experts to identify the factors that experts believed are important for consumers when comparing the privacy and security of IoT devices to inform their purchase decisions. Based on how critical experts believed each factor is in conveying risk to consumers, we distributed these factors across two layers—a primary layer to display on the product package itself or prominently on a website, and a secondary layer available online through a web link or a QR code. We report on the experts’ rationale and arguments used to support their choice of factors. Moreover, to study how consumers would perceive the privacy and security information specified by experts, we conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with 15 participants, who had purchased at least one IoT device (smart home device or wearable). Based on the results of our expert elicitation and consumer studies, we propose a prototype privacy and security label to help consumers make more informed IoT-related purchase decisions.

88 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The libertarian‐paternalist approach to policy known as nudge initially developed by Thaler and Sunstein is discussed, with its emphasis on designing spaces to shape the behavior of individuals while not restricting consumer choice or imposing restrictions or penalties on producers.
Abstract: This paper examines the potential for new front-of-pack nutrition labelling initiatives to “nudge” consumers towards healthier food choices. The libertarian-paternalist approach to policy known as nudge initially developed by Thaler and Sunstein is discussed, with its emphasis on designing spaces (including the space of the food label) to shape the behaviour of individuals while not restricting consumer choice or imposing restrictions or penalties on producers. In the context of concerns over diet-related chronic diseases and obesity, new front-of-pack interpretive nutrition labels have been proposed or implemented in an attempt to shift consumer dietary choices, including the multiple traffic light labelling system (MTL) in the U.K. and the Health Star Rating (HSR) system in Australia. We identify some of the characteristics, the underlying nutritional philosophies and the limitations of these front-of-pack labelling schemes. We suggest that the potential of these schemes is compromised by the co-existence on the food label of many other forms of nutrition information and food marketing. Some alternative ways of labelling and communicating the nutritional quality of foods are also discussed.

67 citations