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David A. King

Bio: David A. King is an academic researcher from University of Cambridge. The author has contributed to research in topics: Adsorption & Adaptive optics. The author has an hindex of 47, co-authored 166 publications receiving 8772 citations. Previous affiliations of David A. King include Spanish National Research Council & University of East Anglia.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an attempt is made to draw correlations between thermal desorption and structural studies of chemisorption on metal surfaces, in particular with relation to the adsorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide on tungsten.

650 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the structure of NO on surfaces, in particular the break-down of vibrational assignments and looked at how these assignments can be improved The NO dissociation process is also discussed along with the formation, and reactions, of the NO dimer, (NO)(2), on some metal surfaces.
Abstract: NO adsorption on metal surfaces has been studied extensively due to its important role in many catalytic processes In the past, it was recognized that the tendency for a metal surface to dissociate NO depends on its position in the periodic table, but little was understood about the dissociation process itself Recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown that this view is oversimplified In addition to the distinction between molecular and dissociative adsorption on surfaces, the structure of NO on metal surfaces has also been the subject of detailed study and debate It is therefore timely to update our ideas about NO adsorption and reactivity Here we examine the structure of NO on surfaces, in particular the break-down of vibrational assignments and we look at how these assignments can be improved The NO dissociation process is also discussed along with the formation, and reactions, of the NO dimer, (NO)(2), on some metal surfaces

312 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: D density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the presence of empty localized nonbonding f states in CeO2 permits the oxidation of Au, enabling subsequent CO adsorption in the WGS reaction.
Abstract: As a promising route for large-scale H2 production, the water-gas-shift reaction (WGS, CO + H(2)O-->CO(2) + H(2)) on ceria-supported Au catalysts is of enormous potential in efforts to move towards a hydrogen economy. Recent research suggests that this reaction is in fact catalyzed by Au cations instead of the conventionally regarded metallic Au particles. Here density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the presence of empty localized nonbonding f states in CeO2 permits the oxidation of Au, enabling subsequent CO adsorption. A feasible reaction pathway leading to H2 production is identified, and it is concluded that four to six atom Au clusters at the O-vacancy sites of ceria catalyze the WGS reaction.

298 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the most recent ARPES results on the cuprate superconductors and their insulating parent and sister compounds is presented in this article, with the purpose of providing an updated summary of the extensive literature.
Abstract: The last decade witnessed significant progress in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and its applications. Today, ARPES experiments with 2-meV energy resolution and $0.2\ifmmode^\circ\else\textdegree\fi{}$ angular resolution are a reality even for photoemission on solids. These technological advances and the improved sample quality have enabled ARPES to emerge as a leading tool in the investigation of the high-${T}_{c}$ superconductors. This paper reviews the most recent ARPES results on the cuprate superconductors and their insulating parent and sister compounds, with the purpose of providing an updated summary of the extensive literature. The low-energy excitations are discussed with emphasis on some of the most relevant issues, such as the Fermi surface and remnant Fermi surface, the superconducting gap, the pseudogap and $d$-wave-like dispersion, evidence of electronic inhomogeneity and nanoscale phase separation, the emergence of coherent quasiparticles through the superconducting transition, and many-body effects in the one-particle spectral function due to the interaction of the charge with magnetic and/or lattice degrees of freedom. Given the dynamic nature of the field, we chose to focus mainly on reviewing the experimental data, as on the experimental side a general consensus has been reached, whereas interpretations and related theoretical models can vary significantly. The first part of the paper introduces photoemission spectroscopy in the context of strongly interacting systems, along with an update on the state-of-the-art instrumentation. The second part provides an overview of the scientific issues relevant to the investigation of the low-energy electronic structure by ARPES. The rest of the paper is devoted to the experimental results from the cuprates, and the discussion is organized along conceptual lines: normal-state electronic structure, interlayer interaction, superconducting gap, coherent superconducting peak, pseudogap, electron self-energy, and collective modes. Within each topic, ARPES data from the various copper oxides are presented.

3,077 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the structural phases and the growth of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are reviewed from a surface science perspective, with emphasis on simple model systems, and a summary of the techniques used for the study of SAMs is given.

2,374 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: In this article, experimental methods for measuring BDEs are presented for measuring C-H bonds, C-C bonds, and C -C-C-H-C Bonds.
Abstract: Introduction Experimental methods for measuring BDEs BDEs of C-H Bonds BDEs of C-C Bonds BDEs of C-halogen bonds BDEs of O-X bonds BDEs of N-X bonds BDEs of S-, Se-, Te-, and Po-X bonds BDEs of Si-, Ge-, Sn-, and Pb-X bonds BDEs of P-, As-, Sb-, and Bi-X bonds BDEs of H(H+/-)-, Li(Li+/-)-, Na(Na+/-)-, K(K+/-)-, Rb(Rb+/-)-, and Cs(Cs+/-)-X bonds BDEs of Be(Be+)-, Mg(Mg+)-, Ca(Ca+)-, Sr(Sr+)-, Ba(Ba+)-, and Ra-X bonds BDEs of Sc(Sc+)-, Y(Y+)-, La(La+)-, and Ac(Ac+)-X bonds BDEs of Ti(Ti+/-)-, Zr(Zr+)-, and Hf(Hf+)-X bonds BDEs of V(V+/-)-, Nb(Nb+)-, and Ta(Ta+)-X bonds BDEs of Cr(Cr+/-)-, Mo(Mo+/-)-, and W(W+/-)-X bonds BDEs of Mn(Mn+/-)-, Tc-, and Re(Re+)-X bonds BDEs of Fe(Fe+/-)-, Ru(Ru+)-, and Os(Os+)-X bonds BDEs of Co(Co+/-)-, Rh(Rh+)-, and Ir(Ir+)-X bonds BDEs of Ni(Ni+/-)-, Pd(Pd+/-)-, and Pt(Pt+/-)-X bonds BDEs of Cu(Cu+/-)-, Ag(Ag+/-)-, and Au(Au+/-)-X bonds BDEs of Zn(Zn+)-, Cd(Cd+)-, and Hg(Hg+)-X bonds BDEs of B(B+/-)-, Al(Al+/-)-, Ga(Ga+/-)-, In(In+/-)-, and Tl(Tl+/-)-X Bonds BDEs in the C-, Si-, Ge-, Sn-, Pb-clusters and complexes BDEs in the N-, P-, As-, Sb-, Bi-clusters and complexes BDEs in the O-, S-, -Se, and Te-clusters and complexes BDEs in the halogenated molecules, clusters, and complexes BDEs in rare gas atom/ion clusters Heats of formation of atoms, radicals, and ions References (1946 through 2006) Index of compound classes Index of compound names

2,335 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: The application of density functional theory to calculate adsorption properties, reaction pathways, and activation energies for surface chemical reactions is reviewed in this article, with particular emphasis on developing concepts that can be used to understand and predict variations in reactivity from one transition metal to the next or the effects of alloying, surface structure, and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions on the reactivity.
Abstract: The application of density functional theory to calculate adsorption properties, reaction pathways, and activation energies for surface chemical reactions is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on developing concepts that can be used to understand and predict variations in reactivity from one transition metal to the next or the effects of alloying, surface structure, and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions on the reactivity. Most examples discussed are concerned with the catalytic properties of transition metal surfaces, but it is shown that the calculational approach and the concepts developed to understand trends in reactivity for metals can also be used for sulfide and oxide catalysts.

2,131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a consistent picture of some key physical properties determining the reactivity of metal and alloy surfaces, and suggest that trends in reactivities can be understood in terms of the hybridization energy between the bonding and anti-bonding adsorbate states and the metal d-bands (when present).

2,008 citations