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David D. Dalgetty

Bio: David D. Dalgetty is an academic researcher from Washington State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wheat flour & Starch. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 182 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a method was developed to efficiently isolate legume cotyledon fibers with relatively high yields and purities using a sieve with 53-μm openings.
Abstract: Methods were developed to efficiently isolate legume cotyledon fibers with relatively high yields and purities. Seeds of pea (Pisum sativum), chickpea (Cicer arientinum), and lentil (Lens culinaris) were roller milled into flour and fractionated into prime starch, tailings starch, and water solubles. Insoluble dietary fiber was isolated from tailings starch by wet screening on sieves with openings ranging from 53 to 90 μm. Yield of insoluble fiber using a sieve with 53-μm openings ranged from 49.7 to 59.2% of insoluble fiber in flour with purities ranging from 85.5 to 87.3%. Soluble dietary fiber was isolated from the water-soluble fraction following acid precipitation of soluble protein at pH 4. Soluble fiber yield ranged from 83.3 to 89.6% of flour soluble fiber with purities ranging from 64.5 to 70.6%. Glucose was the most common sugar component of hulls and soluble cotyledon fibers, while arabinose was the main sugar in insoluble fibers. Insoluble fiber exhibited significantly higher swelling...

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, wheat flour and wheat flour were prepared from wheat flours with either 3, 5, and 7% legume hulls or insoluble cotyledon fibers, or with 1, 3, and 5% soluble cotylenedon fibers isolated from pea, lentil, and chickpea flours.
Abstract: Bread was prepared from wheat flour and wheat flour fortified with either 3, 5, and 7% legume hulls or insoluble cotyledon fibers, or with 1, 3, and 5% soluble cotyledon fibers isolated from pea, lentil, and chickpea flours. Incorporation of hulls or insoluble fibers resulted in increases in dough water absorption by 2–16% and increases in mixing time of dough by 22–147 sec. Addition of soluble fiber resulted in decreases in water absorption as the substitution rate increased and similar mixing times to the control dough. Loaf weights of breads containing hulls or insoluble fibers were generally higher than that of control bread at 149.4–166.5 g. However, the loaf volume of breads fortified with legume hulls and fibers (685–1,010 mL) was lower than that of the control bread (1,021 mL). Breads containing soluble fibers were more attractive in terms of crumb uniformity and color than breads containing either hulls or insoluble fibers. Breads fortified with legume hulls and fibers were higher in moi...

101 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of the characteristics of pulse proteins, current and emerging techniques for their fractionation, their major functional properties and opportunities for their use in various applications is provided.

1,004 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Chickpea has several potential health benefits, and, in combination with other pulses and cereals, it could have beneficial effects on some of the important human diseases such as CVD, type 2 diabetes, digestive diseases and some cancers.
Abstract: Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important pulse crop grown and consumed all over the world, especially in the Afro-Asian countries. It is a good source of carbohydrates and protein, and protein quality is considered to be better than other pulses. Chickpea has significant amounts of all the essential amino acids except sulphur-containing amino acids, which can be complemented by adding cereals to the daily diet. Starch is the major storage carbohydrate followed by dietary fibre, oligosaccharides and simple sugars such as glucose and sucrose. Although lipids are present in low amounts, chickpea is rich in nutritionally important unsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic and oleic acids. β-Sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol are important sterols present in chickpea oil. Ca, Mg, P and, especially, K are also present in chickpea seeds. Chickpea is a good source of important vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, folate and the vitamin A precursor β-carotene. As with other pulses, chickpea seeds also contain anti-nutritional factors which can be reduced or eliminated by different cooking techniques. Chickpea has several potential health benefits, and, in combination with other pulses and cereals, it could have beneficial effects on some of the important human diseases such as CVD, type 2 diabetes, digestive diseases and some cancers. Overall, chickpea is an important pulse crop with a diverse array of potential nutritional and health benefits.

726 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review focuses on research conducted in the past ten years on the non-starch polysaccharides and oligosaccharides found in dry beans, chickpeas, lentils, and dry peas, as well as some non-food applications.

412 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the physicochemical properties of a fiber-rich fraction obtained by dry processing of defatted chia (Salvia hispanica) flour were evaluated and the results indicated that the chia FRF values for the evaluated properties, particularly for water-holding, oil-holding and organic molecule absorption capacity, suggest it could be a useful ingredient in dietetic products such as baked and fried foods.
Abstract: An evaluation was done of some physicochemical properties of a fiber-rich fraction (FRF) obtained by dry processing of defatted chia (Salvia hispanica) flour. The fiber-rich fraction (FRF) had 29.56 g/100 g crude fiber content and 56.46 g/100 g total dietary fiber (TDF) content, of which 53.45 g/100 g was insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) and 3.01 g/100 g was soluble dietary fiber (SDF). The FRF water-holding capacity was 15.41 g/g, its water absorption capacity 11.73 g/g, and its organic molecule absorption capacity 1.09 g/g. The FRF also had low oil-holding (2.02 g/g) and water adsorption (0.3 g/g) capacities. Emulsifying activity in this fraction was 53.26% and emulsion stability was 94.84%. Its evaluated antioxidant activity was 488.8 μmol/L Trolox equivalents/g FRF, which is higher than for many cereals and similar to drinks such as wine, tea, coffee and orange juice. The chia FRF values for the evaluated properties, particularly for water-holding, oil-holding and organic molecule absorption capacity, suggest it could be a useful ingredient in dietetic products such as baked and fried foods, among others.

288 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, different cereal fibres (wheat, maize, oat and barley) were added at 3, 6 and 9 grams/100 grams level into a gluten-free bread formulation based on corn starch, rice flour and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC).
Abstract: The enrichment of gluten-free baked products with dietary fibre seems to be necessary since it has been reported that coeliac patients have generally a low intake of fibre due to their gluten-free diet. In the present study different cereal fibres (wheat, maize, oat and barley) were added at 3, 6 and 9 g/100 g level into a gluten-free bread formulation based on corn starch, rice flour and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC). Doughs were evaluated based on consistency, viscosity and thermal properties. Results showed that maize and oat fibre can be added to gluten-free bread with positive impact on bread nutritional and sensory properties. All breads with 9 g/100 g fibre increased the fibre content of control by 218%, but they were rated lower than those with 3 and 6 g/100 g fibre due to their powdery taste. The formulation containing barley fibre produced loaves that had more intense color and volume comparable to the control. During storage of breads a reduction in crumb moisture content and an increase in firmness were observed. The micrographs of the crumb showed the continuous matrix between starch and maize and/or oat fibre obtaining a more aerated structure.

236 citations