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Author

David Dixon

Other affiliations: University of Hull
Bio: David Dixon is an academic researcher from University of New South Wales. The author has contributed to research in topics: Criminal justice & Interrogation. The author has an hindex of 18, co-authored 53 publications receiving 1254 citations. Previous affiliations of David Dixon include University of Hull.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the impact of street-level law enforcement on Australia's principal heroin market is described. But the focus is on the policing of drug users and user/dealers in public space, and not the harmful consequences of the domination in policing practice of law enforcement.
Abstract: This article describes the impact of street-level law enforcement on Australia's principal heroin market. Based on three years of research, including interviews and extended ethnographic fieldwork, it uses data on drug-use, risk practices, crime, and policing to examine the relationship between law enforcement and harm minimization. Findings suggest that the 'successes' of police crackdowns and their impact on drug markets (including threats to public health and community safety as a result of geographical, social, and substance displacement) may be won at substantial costs, raising doubts as to their value. This study is concerned with tensions in drug policing between commitments to law enforcement and to harm minimization, and with the harmful consequences to public health of the domination in policing practice of law enforcement. Reporting ethno- graphic research in Sydney's principal street-level drug market, and integrating perspectives from research in policing and in public health, we argue for a shift in policing priorities, rejecting suggestions that the law constrains the ability of police to subordinate law enforcement to other objectives. The focus is on the policing of drug users and user/dealers in public space. Such work is primarily carried out by uniformed patrol officers, although plain clothes officers also contribute. These activities have to be placed in the context of other forms of drug policing. During the study period, the research site was subject to the attention of a considerable variety of other police sections and agencies, including local detectives and drug units, regional and district specialists, transit police, the NSW Drug Enforcement Agency, the Australian Federal Police, and the National Crime Authority. These activities interrelated, overlapped, and sometimes conflicted. 1 Studies of drug policing often fail to discriminate except at a general level, for example between supply-side and demand-side strategies. This study indicates that more speci- ficity is needed because of the under-acknowledged importance of street-level enforce- ment (Pearson 1992). Despite the attention which specialist units attract, 'the current

353 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: Theories of Law in Policing as mentioned in this paper have been studied extensively in the literature, including: policing by law and policing by consent, and the legal (non)Regulation of Custodial Interrogation in New South Wales.
Abstract: 1. Theories of Law in Policing 2. Police Powers: Law in the Books and Elsewhere 3. Policing by Law and Policing by Consent 4. Detention for Questioning in England and Wales 5. The Legal (Non)Regulation of Custodial Interrogation in New South Wales 6. Silent Suspects and Police Questions 7. Legality, Regulation and Policing

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Cost of Crackdown: Policing Cabramatta's Heroin Market as discussed by the authors, a book about the criminalization of drugs in Australia, is a good starting point for this paper.
Abstract: (2001). The Cost of Crackdowns: Policing Cabramatta's Heroin Market. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 5-22.

93 citations

Book
09 May 1991
TL;DR: In the late Victorian and Edwardian society, the NAGL's campaign against racecourse bookmaking, the prohibition of street betting gambling and the alternative to prohibition policing illegal gambling was an alternative to the betting duty from anti-gambling to compulsive gambling from prohibition to regulation as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Anti-gambling in late Victorian and Edwardian society the NAGL's campaign against racecourse bookmaking the prohibition of street betting gambling and the NAGL 1906-1919 an alternative to prohibition policing illegal gambling Churchill's betting duty from anti-gambling to compulsive gambling from prohibition to regulation.

66 citations


Cited by
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01 May 1997
TL;DR: Coaching & Communicating for Performance Coaching and communicating for Performance is a highly interactive program that will give supervisors and managers the opportunity to build skills that will enable them to share expectations and set objectives for employees, provide constructive feedback, more effectively engage in learning conversations, and coaching opportunities as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Building Leadership Effectiveness This program encourages leaders to develop practices that transform values into action, vision into realities, obstacles into innovations, and risks into rewards. Participants will be introduced to the five practices of exemplary leadership: modeling the way, inspiring a shared vision, challenging the process, enabling others to act, and encouraging the heart Coaching & Communicating for Performance Coaching & Communicating for Performance is a highly interactive program that will give supervisors and managers the opportunity to build skills that will enable them to share expectations and set objectives for employees, provide constructive feedback, more effectively engage in learning conversations, and coaching opportunities. Skillful Conflict Management for Leaders As a leader, it is important to understand conflict and be effective at conflict management because the way conflict is resolved becomes an integral component of our university’s culture. This series of conflict management sessions help leaders learn and put into practice effective strategies for managing conflict.

4,935 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that much of the most needed 'structural HIV prevention' is unavoidably political in that it calls for community actions and structural changes within a broad framework concerned to alleviate inequity in health, welfare and human rights.

927 citations

Book
06 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the identification and measurement of 'oppressive' police interviewing tactics in Britain is discussed. But the authors focus on the psychological aspects of false confessions and the psychology of false belief leading to a false confession.
Abstract: About the Author.Series Preface.Preface.Acknowledgments.Introduction. PART I: INTERROGATIONS AND CONFESSIONS. Interrogation Tactics and Techniques. Interrogation in Britain. Persons at Risk During Interviews in Police Custody: the Royal Commission Studies. The Identification and Measurement of 'Oppressive' Police Interviewing Tactics in Britain. Why do Suspects Confess? Theories. Why do Suspects Confess? Empirical Findings. Miscarriages of Justice and False Confessions. The Psychology of False Confession: Research and Theoretical Issues. The Psychology of False Confession: Case Examples. PART II: LEGAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS. The English Law on Confessions. The American Law on Confessions. The Psychological Assessment. Suggestibility: Historical and Theoretical Aspects. Interrogative Suggestibility: Empirical Findings. PART III: BRITISH COURT OF APPEAL CASES. The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol Upon the Reliability of Testimony. The Court of Appeal. The 'Guildford Four' and the 'Birmingham Six'. Psychological Vulnerability. Police Impropriety. Misleading Special Knowledge. PART IV: FOREIGN CASES OF DISPUTED CONFESSIONS. Four High Profile American Cases. Canadian and Israeli Cases. Murder in Norway: a False Belief Leading to a False Confession. References. Appendix. Index.

635 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the influence of legitimacy and feelings of obligation on citizens' willingness to cooperate with the police and found that legitimacy has a direct influence on cooperation that is independent of obligation and an indirect influence that flows through people's felt obligations to obey the police.
Abstract: Legitimacy (or “the right to exercise power”) is now an established concept in criminological analysis, especially in relation to policing. Substantial empirical evidence shows the importance of legitimacy in securing law-abiding behavior and cooperation from citizens. Yet adequate theorization has lagged behind empirical evidence, and there has been a conflation of legitimacy with the cognate concepts of “trust” and of “obligation to obey the law.” By drawing on the work of Beetham (1991) and others (e.g., Bottoms and Tankebe, 2012), this study tests the hypothesis that the contents of the multiple dimensions of police legitimacy comprise procedural fairness, distributive fairness, lawfulness, and effectiveness. The study also investigates the relative influence of legitimacy and feelings of obligation on citizens’ willingness to cooperate with the police. Using data from London, the results substantiate the hypothesized dimensions of police legitimacy. In addition, legitimacy was found to exhibit both a direct influence on cooperation that is independent of obligation and an indirect influence that flows through people's felt obligations to obey the police. Implications for future research are discussed.

590 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Analysis of the narratives and daily lived experiences of women sex workers highlight the urgent need for a renewed HIV prevention strategy that moves beyond a solely individual-level focus to structural and environmental interventions that facilitate 'enabling environments' for HIV prevention.

489 citations