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David Jacoby

Bio: David Jacoby is an academic researcher from Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The author has contributed to research in topics: Empire & Byzantine architecture. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 41 publications receiving 493 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new reading of Byzantine commercial and fiscal provisions in a contemporary context and in a comparative framework reveals some misunderstood or overlooked aspects of their content, suggests novel inter-pretations, and sheds light on some of their effects on trade, shipping and the Italian settletment pattern in the Empire before the Fourth Crusade as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Between 1082 and· 1192 several Byzantine emperors conferred extensive privileges on the three main Italian maritime powers, Venice, Pisa and Genoa A new reading of their commercial and fiscal provisions in a contemporary context and in a comparative framework reveals some misunderstood or overlooked aspects of their content, suggests novel inter­pretations, and sheds light on some of their effects on trade, shipping and the Italian settletment pattern in the Empire before the Fourth Crusade The disparity between the respective privileges granted to the three maritime powers was far wider than generally assumed Deliberate measures taken by the Byzantine government, the arbitrary action of its officials, especially in the provinces, and political developments affected in various ways, at times heavily, the implementation of these privileges and the benefit deri­ving from them These factors should be taken into account in any evalua­tion of Italian trade and settlement in Byzantium and the impact these had on the Empire's economy

45 citations

Book
01 Jun 1989
TL;DR: In this article, the Variorum Reprints series was extended with Societe et demographie (SED) under the following titles: Societa et.
Abstract: This title was first published in 2001. This volume is a sequal to the two published in the Variorum Reprints series,in 1975 and 1979 respectively under the following titles: Societe et demographie.

37 citations


Cited by
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Book
Avner Greif1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a multi-disciplinary perspective to study endogenous institutions and their dynamics, including the influence of the past, the ability of institutions to change, and the difficulty to study them empirically and devise a policy aimed at altering them.
Abstract: It is widely believed that current disparities in economic, political, and social outcomes reflect distinct institutions. Institutions are invoked to explain why some countries are rich and others poor, some democratic and others dictatorial. But arguments of this sort gloss over the question of what institutions are, how they come about, and why they persist. They also fail to explain why institutions are influenced by the past, why it is that they can sometimes change, why they differ so much from society to society, and why it is hard to study them empirically and devise a policy aimed at altering them. This 2006 book seeks to overcome these problems, which have exercised economists, sociologists, political scientists, and a host of other researchers who use the social sciences to study history, law, and business administration. It presents a multi-disciplinary perspective to study endogenous institutions and their dynamics.

1,809 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The first book of its kind, the authors, provides a richly informative and comprehensive guide to the world of late antiquity with the latest scholarship to the researcher along with great reading pleasure to the browser.
Abstract: The first book of its kind, this richly informative and comprehensive guide to the world of late antiquity offers the latest scholarship to the researcher along with great reading pleasure to the browser. In eleven comprehensive essays and in over 500 encyclopedic entries, an international cast of experts provides essential information and fresh perspectives on the history and culture of an era marked by the rise of two world religions, unprecedented political upheavals that remade the map of the known world, and the creation of art of enduring glory. By extending the commonly accepted chronological and territorial boundaries of the period--to encompass Roman, Byzantine, Sassanian, and early Islamic cultures, from the middle of the third century to the end of the eighth--this guide makes new connections and permits revealing comparisons. Consult the article on \"Angels\" and discover their meaning in Islamic as well as classical and Judeo-Christian traditions. Refer to \"Children,\" \"Concubinage,\" and \"Divorce\" for a fascinating interweaving of information on the family. Read the essay on \"Barbarians and Ethnicity\" and see how a topic as current as the construction of identity played out in earlier times, from the Greeks and Romans to the Turks, Huns, and Saxons. Turn to \"Empire Building\" to learn how the empire of Constantine was supported by architecture and ceremony. Or follow your own path through the broad range of entries on politics, manufacturing and commerce, the arts, philosophy, religion, geography, ethnicity, and domestic life. Each entry introduces readers to another facet of the postclassical world: historic figures and places, institutions, burial customs, food, money, public life, and amusements. A splendid selection of illustrations enhances the portrait. The intriguing era of late antiquity emerges completely and clearly, viewed in a new light, in a guide that will be relished by scholars and general readers alike.

203 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a divergence in the duration of rule for monarchs in Western Europe and the Islamic world beginning in the medieval period is documented, and the authors argue that forms of executive constraint that emerged under feudal institutions were associated with increased political stability and find empirical support for this argument.
Abstract: We document a divergence in the duration of rule for monarchs in Western Europe and the Islamic world beginning in the medieval period. While leadership tenures in the two regions were similar in the 8th century, Christian kings became increasingly long lived compared to Muslim sultans. We argue that forms of executive constraint that emerged under feudal institutions in Western Europe were associated with increased political stability and find empirical support for this argument. While feudal institutions served as the basis for military recruitment by European monarchs, Muslim sultans relied on mamlukism—or the use of military slaves imported from non-Muslim lands. Dependence on mamluk armies limited the bargaining strength of local notables vis-` a-vis the sultan, hindering the development of a productively adversarial relationship between ruler and local elites. We argue that Muslim societies’ reliance on mamluks, rather than local elites, as the basis for military leadership, may explain why the Glorious Revolution occurred in England, not Egypt.

176 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Early Christian art - Rome and the legacy of the caesars early Christian art as discussed by the authors, the eastern provinces of the empire and the foundation of Constantinople early Christ art - the synthesis of the secular and the religious image the age of Justinian the forsaken west and the emergence of the supreme pontiff the troubled east the triumph of orthodoxy the scholar of orthodoxy, the scholar emperor and the imperial ideal metropolitan authority metropolitan diffusion and decline.
Abstract: Early Christian art - Rome and the legacy of the caesars early Christian art - the eastern provinces of the empire and the foundation of Constantinople early Christian art - the synthesis of the secular and the religious image the age of Justinian the forsaken west and the emergence of the supreme pontiff the troubled east the triumph of orthodoxy the scholar of orthodoxy the scholar emperor and the triumph of the imperial ideal metropolitan authority metropolitan diffusion and decline.

175 citations

Book
21 May 2015
TL;DR: Riley-Smith and Luscombe as mentioned in this paper discuss the development of law in the early eleventh and twelfth centuries, and the role of the Church in the development and evolution of law.
Abstract: Introduction Jonathan Riley-Smith and David Luscombe 1. The rural economy and demographic growth Robert Fossier 2. Towns and the growth of trade Derek Keene 3. Government and community, 1024-1204 Susan Reynolds 4. The development of law Peter Landau 5. Knightly society Jean Flori 6. War, peace and the Christian order, 1024-1204 Ernst-Dieter Hehl 7. The structure of the church, 1024-1073 H. E. J. Cowdrey 8. Reform and the church, 1073-1122 I. S. Robinson 9. Religious communities, 1024-1215 Giles Constable 10. The institutions of the church, 1073-1216 I. S. Robinson 11. Thought and learning D. E. Luscombe 12. Religion and laity (including popular devotions and heresy) Bernard Hamilton 13. The crusades, 1095-1198 Jonathan Riley-Smith 14. The eastern churches Jean Richard 15. Muslim Spain and Portugal: al-Andalus and its neighbours, 1025-1198 Hugh Kennedy 16. The Jews in Europe and the Mediterranean basin in the eleventh and twelfth centuries Robert Chazan 17. Literature (Latin and vernacular) Jan Ziolkowski 18. Romanesque and gothic: architecture and the arts Patrick Kidson List of primary sources Bibliography of secondary sources arranged by chapter Index of manuscripts.

175 citations