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David Richmond

Bio: David Richmond is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reflective practice. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the use of a catalogue document that two of the authors used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B.A. (Hons) Theatre level 2 modules entitled performing the self and artist as witness.
Abstract: In this article we reflect on reflection. To do this, we share examples of pedagogic approaches used in undergraduate performance programmes at York St John University that re-situate reflective practice within creative practice. For example, we explore the creative, multimodal use of a catalogue document that two of the authors used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B.A. (Hons) Theatre level 2 modules entitled performing the self & artist as witness. These modules aim to encourage students to consider themselves in some sense auteurs of themselves and their art practice. The case study illustrates that we need to go beyond the familiar if we are to be reflexive about the role of reflection in creative practice education.

5 citations


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DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this article, a visual frame taxonomy was developed by using ideograms for architecture education. But the taxonomy focused on ideogram illustrations as the core of a taxonomy, the research aims to contribute to the readjustment of architecture education to the learning styles of today's generation of students.
Abstract: Over the last twenty years, framing as a tool for sensemaking has become popular in social sciences, politics and media studies. However, the use of framing in design education is less frequent. Accordingly, framing architectural design practices and construction challenges holds great potential. This paper aims at the discussion of opportunities and challenges of using a framework in architecture education. In this context, a frame or a framework can be briefly defined as a collection of conventions that one relies on to understand a certain given concept. In this research I intend to combine knowledge from three different fields, architecture education, communication design and framing research. A brief review of the three topics is made to describe their individual qualities, their relevance in contemporary education and their combined potential. In order to be able to experiment with frames, I designed and developed a visual frame taxonomy by using ideograms for architecture education. The frame taxonomy joins the architecture education and contemporary learning styles. Focusing on ideogram illustrations as the core of the taxonomy, the research aims to contribute to the readjustment of architecture education to the learning styles of today’s generation of students. In this context I will discuss two educational case studies I performed at two different academies and one learning object. The workshops were based on the use of ideograms in workshop exercises. By the use of visual design briefs, students worked on form‐ study exercises and material research. The use of ideograms in design briefs proved effective in communicating the content of the design exercise. By providing the student with visual topics to work on, the student showed a more efficient design process. In writing exercises, the icons contributed to a better understanding of the topics to discuss beforehand and structuring the research during the writing process.

7 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the integration of creative, critical and reflective thinking practices within a design process leads to the sustained reflexive habits and evolving critical dispositions crucial to design and technology education.
Abstract: A practice of critique, integrated with design as a ‘disciplinary habit of mind’ (Klebesadel and Kornetsky 2009, p. 99), sustains and hyperextends students’ capacity for design thinking and metacognition. A forward-thinking, design-focused curriculum in design and technology education demands the evolution of such critical dispositions. Reflective thinking and writing practices unite creative and critical analysis with design process, enabling deeper engagement with praxis, metacognition and critique. This chapter observes how these critical, creative and reflective dialogic design-based thinking and writing practices, already employed in design and visual arts education, can augment design and technology curricula. Reflective practice and writing are able to enhance cyclic, critical and design thinking within design and technology curricula through the praxis-based application of critique. Practical methods to stimulate modes of design thinking and communication include critical, creative and reflective thinking and writing. Application of these dialogic methods occurs through opportunities for low-risk exploration through oral and written discourse within a critical and cylic design process. The integration of creative, critical and reflective thinking practices within a design process leads to the sustained reflexive habits and evolving critical dispositions crucial to design and technology education.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors identified studies in design education literature with three categories; conceptual and empirical studies, as well as instructional cases, and revealed four major themes with 18 sub-themes in which writing can render the design education discourse.
Abstract: Abstract In pursuit of constructivist learning, design education can benefit from various methods, tools and applications that directly influence learners’ design processes. In this sense, writing has become prominent as a learning and teaching tool with the attention of both design teachers and design researchers. However, there is no particular study addressing a comprehensive characterization of writing-related studies in design education within the existing literature. Through this scoping literature review, we sought answers about how writing serves as a pedagogical vehicle in design education. To achieve this, we extracted and identified studies in design education literature with three categories; conceptual and empirical studies, as well as instructional cases. Thematic analysis revealed four major themes with 18 sub-themes in which writing can render the design education discourse. Briefly, through a wide range of writing formats, writing can promote processes, develop skills, utilize tools and deal with issues regarding design.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The drawing and writing experiment that I offered at the Centre of Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) conference in Berlin, 2010 is related to my Ph.D. research.
Abstract: The drawing and writing experiment that I offered at the Centre of Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) conference in Berlin, 2010 is related to my Ph.D. research (based at Leeds Metropolitan University). The research centres around what I am calling the lateral or supra-rational sides of designing processes. While the term lateral was originally made popular by de Bono (1967) in his book Lateral Thinking, its association in the research project embraces the kinds of thinking and making connected to ideation, visualization, intuition and other elements of a sphere of practice that are harder to contain and evidence within orthodox Humanities approaches to academic research. Schon (1983) in The Reflective Practitioner, Law on Beyond Method: Mess (2004) and tangentially, in terms of contemplating a network of practice, Lefebvre's Rhythmanalysis (1992) have all further influenced my research. The research project's particular portrait of processes emerged, in a first stage, from interviews with design students, designers/tutors and young designers in Leeds and at the Royal College of Art. The second, more speculative stage of research asks what might happen if such subject matter and such modes of practice are imposed on writing culture. The drawing and writing experiment in Berlin was a hands-on exploration of the theme of Observation.