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David T. Beito

Bio: David T. Beito is an academic researcher from University of Nebraska–Lincoln. The author has contributed to research in topics: Libertarianism & Government. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 12 publications receiving 204 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 May 1989
TL;DR: The tax rebellion has not been a favorite topic of American historians as mentioned in this paper, and few studies deal with the politics of taxation-much less tax revolt-after the Whiskey Rebellion of the 1790s, which is lamentable not only because the taxpayers' protest merits consideration as a historical phenomenon in its own right but also it offers a suggestive approach to several vital questions.
Abstract: ACKNOWLEDGMENTS It is impossible to thank adequately all of the individuals who helped me in preparing this book. At the onset, I would like to express my debt to Allan G. Bogue. His insightful comments and suggestions have greatly enhanced this book on both a stylistic and a conceptual level. Stanley K. Schultz also deserves special praise. He never hesitated to take time out of his busy schedule to offer suggestions and encouragement. James L. Baughman brought home the necessity of putting this work into an historiographical context. Had it not been for the help of Walter E. Grinder and Leonard P. this book might not have been completed. Wal-ter proved instrumental in introducing the manuscript to Paul Betz of the University of North Carolina Press. The Institute awarded me a postdoctoral fellowship to continue my research and rewrite my dissertation for publication. The enthusiastic support and comments offered by Ralph Raico and Lawrence H. White, also active with the Institute, helped get my work started on the right foot. rendered invaluable and patient aid in arranging for my defense. Most of all, I want to thank my parents Rangvald and Doris Beito. Without their constant and heart-ening encouragement, this book would not have been possible. The United States owes its birth in part to a tax strike. Despite this fact, tax rebellion has not been a favorite topic of American historians. Remarkably few studies deal with the politics of taxation-much less tax revolt-after the Whiskey Rebellion of the 1790s. This neglect is lamentable not only because the taxpayers' protest merits consideration as a historical phenomenon in its own right but because it also it offers a suggestive approach to several vital questions. Chief among these is the relationship of taxation conflicts to the following issues: the perpetuation of legitimacy by the state, class theory, and the strengths, weaknesses, and persistence of anti-big-government thought during American economic crises. 1 Two historians who stand out in this still-sparse field are James Ring Adams and Clifton Yearley. Adams pointed to the role of the radical Jacksonian Locofoco Democrats in promoting tax-resistance initiatives, such as voters' approval of bond issues and constitu-tionallimitations on state debt. He expanded on work by historians, such as Lee Benson, who have highlighted the "extreme antistate doctrine" of the Locofocos. William Leggett, the chief intellectual spokesman of the Locofocos, advocated the strict laissez-faire doctrine that government "possesses no …

81 citations

Book
10 May 2002
TL;DR: The case for land lease versus subdivision is discussed in this paper, where the authors argue that private collective property rights can be used to improve the quality of life in the voluntary city.
Abstract: Toward a rebirth of civil society. Building the voluntary city. Laissez-faire urban planning / Stephen Davies. The private places of St. Louis : urban infrastructure through private planning / David T. Beito. The voluntary provision of public goods? The turnpike companies of early America / Daniel Klein. Entrepreneurial city planning : Chicago's central manufacturing district / Robert C. Arne -- Law and social services in the voluntary city. Justice without government : the Merchant Courts of Medieval Europe and their modern counterparts / Bruce L. Benson. The private provision of police during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries / Stephen Davies. "This enormous army" : The mutual-aid tradition of American fraternal societies before the twentieth century / David T. Beito. Medical care through mutual aid : the friendly societies of Great Britain / David G. Green. Education in the voluntary city / James Tooley -- The voluntary city and community. Proprietary communities and community associations / Fred E. Foldvary. Contractual governments in theory and practice / Donald J. Boudreaux and Randall G. Holcombe. Privatizing the neighborhood : a proposal to replace zoning with private collective property rights to existing neighborhoods / Robert H. Nelson. The case for land lease versus subdivision : homeowners' associations reconsidered / Spencer Heath MacCallum -- Epilogue. Market challenges and government failure : lessons from the voluntary city / Alexander Tabarrok.

63 citations

Book
08 Apr 2009
TL;DR: The Black Maverick: T. R. M. Howard's Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power is a valuable contribution to the study of African American life and history.
Abstract: David T. Beito and Linda Royster Beito’s Black Maverick: T. R. M. Howard’s Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power is a valuable contribution to the study of African American life and history. It is a historically informed biography that offers significant insight into the individuals, organizations, and locales necessary to understand the role and risks assumed by African American entrepreneurs in the Mississippi Delta prior to the 1980s.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Afro-American Hospital of Yazoo City, Mississippi as discussed by the authors was a leading health care supplier for blacks in the Mississippi Delta for nearly 40 years and provided a wide range of medical services.
Abstract: Under the burden of Jim Crow, how did African Americans obtain health care? For nearly 40 years the Afro-American Hospital of Yazoo City, Mississippi, was a leading health care supplier for blacks in the Mississippi Delta. It was founded in 1928 by the Afro-American Sons and Daughters, a black fraternal society, and provided a wide range of medical services. The society, which eventually had 35,000 members, was led by Thomas J. Huddleston, a prosperous black entrepreneur and advocate of Booker T. Washington's self-help philosophy. The hospital had a low death rate compared to other hospitals that served blacks in the South during the period. It ceased operation in 1966 as a fraternal entity after years of increasingly burdensome regulation, competitive pressure from government and third-party health care alternatives, and the migration of younger dues-paying blacks to the North.

17 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Independent Review does not accept pronouncements of government officials nor the conventional wisdom at face value as mentioned in this paper, and is available on mobile devices or tablets on the Apple App Store, Google Play, or Magzter.
Abstract: Perfect for anyone on the go! The Independent Review is now available on mobile devices or tablets on the Apple App Store, Google Play, or Magzter. Learn More. “The Independent Review does not accept pronouncements of government officials nor the conventional wisdom at face value.” —JOHN R. MACARTHUR, Publisher, Harper’s “The Independent Review is excellent.” —GARY BECKER, Noble Laureate in Economic Sciences

9 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: The Social Transformation of American Medicine is one of the most comprehensive studies on the rise of the medical profession and the development of the health care industry published to date, Starr is able to span the fields of medicine so that he discusses intelligently the economic, political, and historical developments in medical care.
Abstract: The Social Transformation of American Medicine is one of the most comprehensive studies on the rise of the medical profession and the development of the health care industry published to date, Starr is able to span the fields of medicine so that he discusses intelligently the economic, political, and historical developments in medical care. His wri ting is clear and succinct, his arguments are copiously footnoted, and the inferences he draws are sound. In Book I, he covers \"the rise of medical authority and the shaping of the medical system\"; in Book II, \"doctors, the State, and the coming of the corporation.\" Reviews by Daniel Bell of Harvard and George Silver of Yale call Starr's work brilliant-I would agree. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand the current health care system. Starr describes the movement of the medical profession from one that was initially viewed skeptically to one that was later embraced; and now, coming full circle, to one that is viewed critically. Starr maintains that the current status of American medicine is the result of our history of accommodating professional interests while failing to exercise control over health programs, and then needing to adopt piecemeal regulations and cut-backs on programs that become too inflationary, One of the primary messages I take from this book is the importance of a com bination of forces: a profession's authority, the political climate, and the current philosophy about health care. Starr illustrates how these forces coalesce to defeat or achieve medical improvements. As occupational therapists, we are dependent on the development of the health care industry. It is wise for us to understand the forces that have an impact on medical care and what they could mean for our profession, Kay Barbara Schwartz, M.S., OTR

796 citations

Book
09 Jul 2013
TL;DR: The Rise of the Warrior Cop as discussed by the authors describes how politicians' ill-considered policies and relentless declarations of war against vague enemies like crime, drugs, and terror have blurred the distinction between cop and soldier.
Abstract: The last days of colonialism taught America's revolutionaries that soldiers in the streets bring conflict and tyranny. As a result, our country has generally worked to keep the military out of law enforcement. But according to investigative reporter Radley Balko, over the last several decades, America's cops have increasingly come to resemble ground troops. The consequences have been dire: the home is no longer a place of sanctuary, the Fourth Amendment has been gutted, and police today have been conditioned to see the citizens they serve as an other--an enemy. Today's armored-up policemen are a far cry from the constables of early America. The unrest of the 1960s brought about the invention of the SWAT unit--which in turn led to the debut of military tactics in the ranks of police officers. Nixon's War on Drugs, Reagan's War on Poverty, Clinton's COPS program, the post--9/11 security state under Bush and Obama: by degrees, each of these innovations expanded and empowered police forces, always at the expense of civil liberties. And these are just four among a slew of reckless programs. In Rise of the Warrior Cop, Balko shows how politicians' ill-considered policies and relentless declarations of war against vague enemies like crime, drugs, and terror have blurred the distinction between cop and soldier. His fascinating, frightening narrative shows how over a generation, a creeping battlefield mentality has isolated and alienated American police officers and put them on a collision course with the values of a free society.

186 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: Exploring the history and impact of fraternal societies in the United States, David Beito uncovers the vital importance they had in the social and fiscal lives of millions of American families.
Abstract: During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, more Americans belonged to fraternal societies than to any other kind of voluntary association, with the possible exception of churches. Despite the stereotypical image of the lodge as the exclusive domain of white men, fraternalism cut across race, class, and gender lines to include women, African Americans, and immigrants. Exploring the history and impact of fraternal societies in the United States, David Beito uncovers the vital importance they had in the social and fiscal lives of millions of American families. Much more than a means of addressing deep-seated cultural, psychological, and gender needs, fraternal societies gave Americans a way to provide themselves with social-welfare services that would otherwise have been inaccessible, Beito argues. In addition to creating vast social and mutual aid networks among the poor and in the working class, they made affordable life and health insurance available to their members and established hospitals, orphanages, and homes for the elderly. Fraternal societies continued their commitment to mutual aid even into the early years of the Great Depression, Beito says, but changing cultural attitudes and the expanding welfare state eventually propelled their decline. |David Beito's book establishes the enormous impact of fraternal societies on the social lives and fiscal circumstances of millions of Americans between 1890 and 1967. In addition to creating vast social and mutual aid networks for the poor and the working class, fraternal organizations offered insurance policies to members and established hospitals, orphanages, and homes for the elderly.

122 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Georg Glasze1
TL;DR: In this article, the analysis of private neighbourhoods as club economies against the background of historically and regionally differentiated patterns of urban governance is presented, which render urban development path-dependent and evaluate the political and social consequences, the private neighbourhoods are analyzed as a new form of political organisation and are compared with a territorial organisa...
Abstract: The spreading of privately organised and often gated neighbourhoods in many regions of the world has triggered a widespread discussion about the relations between social and urban development. This paper presents some reflections on the economic and political organisation of this type of housing. First, the club goods theory is used to explain the potential attractiveness of this form of housing for developers, local governments as well as residents. However, the club goods theory alone does not enable one to understand the global but regionally differentiated development. Therefore, second, this paper proposes to view the analysis of private neighbourhoods as club economies against the background of historically and regionally differentiated patterns of urban governance which render urban development path-dependent. Third, in order to evaluate the political and social consequences, the private neighbourhoods are analysed as a new form of political organisation and are compared with a territorial organisa...

119 citations