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Author

David Tse

Other affiliations: AT&T, University of California, Berkeley, Bell Labs  ...read more
Bio: David Tse is an academic researcher from Stanford University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Communication channel & Channel capacity. The author has an hindex of 92, co-authored 438 publication(s) receiving 67248 citation(s). Previous affiliations of David Tse include AT&T & University of California, Berkeley.
Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
J.N. Laneman1, David Tse2, Gregory W. Wornell1Institutions (2)
TL;DR: Using distributed antennas, this work develops and analyzes low-complexity cooperative diversity protocols that combat fading induced by multipath propagation in wireless networks and develops performance characterizations in terms of outage events and associated outage probabilities, which measure robustness of the transmissions to fading.
Abstract: We develop and analyze low-complexity cooperative diversity protocols that combat fading induced by multipath propagation in wireless networks. The underlying techniques exploit space diversity available through cooperating terminals' relaying signals for one another. We outline several strategies employed by the cooperating radios, including fixed relaying schemes such as amplify-and-forward and decode-and-forward, selection relaying schemes that adapt based upon channel measurements between the cooperating terminals, and incremental relaying schemes that adapt based upon limited feedback from the destination terminal. We develop performance characterizations in terms of outage events and associated outage probabilities, which measure robustness of the transmissions to fading, focusing on the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. Except for fixed decode-and-forward, all of our cooperative diversity protocols are efficient in the sense that they achieve full diversity (i.e., second-order diversity in the case of two terminals), and, moreover, are close to optimum (within 1.5 dB) in certain regimes. Thus, using distributed antennas, we can provide the powerful benefits of space diversity without need for physical arrays, though at a loss of spectral efficiency due to half-duplex operation and possibly at the cost of additional receive hardware. Applicable to any wireless setting, including cellular or ad hoc networks-wherever space constraints preclude the use of physical arrays-the performance characterizations reveal that large power or energy savings result from the use of these protocols.

12,519 citations


Book
David Tse1, Pramod Viswanath2Institutions (2)
01 Jan 2005
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. The wireless channel 3. Point-to-point communication: detection, diversity and channel uncertainty 4. Cellular systems: multiple access and interference management 5. Capacity of wireless channels 6. Multiuser capacity and opportunistic communication 7. MIMO I: spatial multiplexing and channel modeling 8. MIMO II: capacity and multiplexing architectures 9. MIMO III: diversity-multiplexing tradeoff and universal space-time codes 10. MIMO IV: multiuser communication A. Detection and estimation in additive Gaussian noise B. Information theory background.

7,400 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Lizhong Zheng1, David Tse1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: A simple characterization of the optimal tradeoff curve is given and used to evaluate the performance of existing multiple antenna schemes for the richly scattered Rayleigh-fading channel.
Abstract: Multiple antennas can be used for increasing the amount of diversity or the number of degrees of freedom in wireless communication systems. We propose the point of view that both types of gains can be simultaneously obtained for a given multiple-antenna channel, but there is a fundamental tradeoff between how much of each any coding scheme can get. For the richly scattered Rayleigh-fading channel, we give a simple characterization of the optimal tradeoff curve and use it to evaluate the performance of existing multiple antenna schemes.

4,264 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Pramod Viswanath1, David Tse2, Rajiv LaroiaInstitutions (2)
01 Jun 2002
TL;DR: This work shows that true beamforming gains can be achieved when there are sufficient users, even though very limited channel feedback is needed, and proposes the use of multiple transmit antennas to induce large and fast channel fluctuations so that multiuser diversity can still be exploited.
Abstract: Multiuser diversity is a form of diversity inherent in a wireless network, provided by independent time-varying channels across the different users. The diversity benefit is exploited by tracking the channel fluctuations of the users and scheduling transmissions to users when their instantaneous channel quality is near the peak. The diversity gain increases with the dynamic range of the fluctuations and is thus limited in environments with little scattering and/or slow fading. In such environments, we propose the use of multiple transmit antennas to induce large and fast channel fluctuations so that multiuser diversity can still be exploited. The scheme can be interpreted as opportunistic beamforming and we show that true beamforming gains can be achieved when there are sufficient users, even though very limited channel feedback is needed. Furthermore, in a cellular system, the scheme plays an additional role of opportunistic nulling of the interference created on users of adjacent cells. We discuss the design implications of implementing. this scheme in a complete wireless system.

3,015 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Matthias Grossglauser1, David Tse2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: The per-session throughput for applications with loose delay constraints, such that the topology changes over the time-scale of packet delivery, can be increased dramatically under this assumption, and a form of multiuser diversity via packet relaying is exploited.
Abstract: The capacity of ad hoc wireless networks is constrained by the mutual interference of concurrent transmissions between nodes. We study a model of an ad hoc network where n nodes communicate in random source-destination pairs. These nodes are assumed to be mobile. We examine the per-session throughput for applications with loose delay constraints, such that the topology changes over the time-scale of packet delivery. Under this assumption, the per-user throughput can increase dramatically when nodes are mobile rather than fixed. This improvement can be achieved by exploiting a form of multiuser diversity via packet relaying.

2,698 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
J.N. Laneman1, David Tse2, Gregory W. Wornell1Institutions (2)
TL;DR: Using distributed antennas, this work develops and analyzes low-complexity cooperative diversity protocols that combat fading induced by multipath propagation in wireless networks and develops performance characterizations in terms of outage events and associated outage probabilities, which measure robustness of the transmissions to fading.
Abstract: We develop and analyze low-complexity cooperative diversity protocols that combat fading induced by multipath propagation in wireless networks. The underlying techniques exploit space diversity available through cooperating terminals' relaying signals for one another. We outline several strategies employed by the cooperating radios, including fixed relaying schemes such as amplify-and-forward and decode-and-forward, selection relaying schemes that adapt based upon channel measurements between the cooperating terminals, and incremental relaying schemes that adapt based upon limited feedback from the destination terminal. We develop performance characterizations in terms of outage events and associated outage probabilities, which measure robustness of the transmissions to fading, focusing on the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. Except for fixed decode-and-forward, all of our cooperative diversity protocols are efficient in the sense that they achieve full diversity (i.e., second-order diversity in the case of two terminals), and, moreover, are close to optimum (within 1.5 dB) in certain regimes. Thus, using distributed antennas, we can provide the powerful benefits of space diversity without need for physical arrays, though at a loss of spectral efficiency due to half-duplex operation and possibly at the cost of additional receive hardware. Applicable to any wireless setting, including cellular or ad hoc networks-wherever space constraints preclude the use of physical arrays-the performance characterizations reveal that large power or energy savings result from the use of these protocols.

12,519 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Simon Haykin1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Following the discussion of interference temperature as a new metric for the quantification and management of interference, the paper addresses three fundamental cognitive tasks: radio-scene analysis, channel-state estimation and predictive modeling, and the emergent behavior of cognitive radio.
Abstract: Cognitive radio is viewed as a novel approach for improving the utilization of a precious natural resource: the radio electromagnetic spectrum. The cognitive radio, built on a software-defined radio, is defined as an intelligent wireless communication system that is aware of its environment and uses the methodology of understanding-by-building to learn from the environment and adapt to statistical variations in the input stimuli, with two primary objectives in mind: /spl middot/ highly reliable communication whenever and wherever needed; /spl middot/ efficient utilization of the radio spectrum. Following the discussion of interference temperature as a new metric for the quantification and management of interference, the paper addresses three fundamental cognitive tasks. 1) Radio-scene analysis. 2) Channel-state estimation and predictive modeling. 3) Transmit-power control and dynamic spectrum management. This work also discusses the emergent behavior of cognitive radio.

11,825 citations


Christopher M. Bishop1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 2006
Abstract: Probability Distributions.- Linear Models for Regression.- Linear Models for Classification.- Neural Networks.- Kernel Methods.- Sparse Kernel Machines.- Graphical Models.- Mixture Models and EM.- Approximate Inference.- Sampling Methods.- Continuous Latent Variables.- Sequential Data.- Combining Models.

10,141 citations


01 Jun 2012
Abstract: The lion's share of bacteria in various environments cannot be cloned in the laboratory and thus cannot be sequenced using existing technologies. A major goal of single-cell genomics is to complement gene-centric metagenomic data with whole-genome assemblies of uncultivated organisms. Assembly of single-cell data is challenging because of highly non-uniform read coverage as well as elevated levels of sequencing errors and chimeric reads. We describe SPAdes, a new assembler for both single-cell and standard (multicell) assembly, and demonstrate that it improves on the recently released E+V-SC assembler (specialized for single-cell data) and on popular assemblers Velvet and SoapDeNovo (for multicell data). SPAdes generates single-cell assemblies, providing information about genomes of uncultivatable bacteria that vastly exceeds what may be obtained via traditional metagenomics studies. SPAdes is available online ( http://bioinf.spbau.ru/spades ). It is distributed as open source software.

10,124 citations


Book
01 Jan 2005

9,031 citations


Network Information
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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 92

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20219
202021
201918
201822
201715
201617