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Author

Dean Baker

Bio: Dean Baker is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Public policy. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7 citations.
Topics: Public policy

Papers
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01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that economists often tell the public that its preferred policy path will not have the intended effect, and may actually lead to outcomes that are the opposite of what is intended.
Abstract: Economists have come to play an enormously important role in public policy debates. There use of their expertise to effectively act as priests, telling the less informed public what the impact of their various policy proposals will be on the economy’s future performance. Economists often tell the public that its preferred policy path will not have the intended effect, and may actually lead to outcomes that are the opposite of what is intended.

7 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that the supply of educated workers appears weakly responsive to short-term wage signals and moderately responsive to long-term employment conditions, and that failure to respond rapidly to changes in labour demand may be one factor driving inequality in wages across occupations and in the aggregate economy.
Abstract: Higher education is considered vital for developing a productive and dynamic labour force to meet the demands of the global economy. How effectively does the US higher education sector respond to labour market signals? We match US postsecondary degree completions from 1984 to 2008 with occupational employment statistics and employ an Instrumental Variable (IV) strategy to examine the supply response to changes in occupation specific demand. The supply of educated workers appears weakly responsive to short-term wage signals and moderately responsive to long-term employment conditions. Analysis reveals a sizeable degree of heterogeneity and lag in the responsiveness across specific occupation–degree pairings. Failure to respond rapidly to changes in labour demand may be one factor driving inequality in wages across occupations and in the aggregate economy. We suggest some simple policy measures to help increase the responsiveness of the higher education sector, both in terms of the output of specific degree...

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

7 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The nueva globalización comercial modificó el mapa de la industria mundial as discussed by the authors, in particular, en el Sur de la misma manera.
Abstract: La nueva globalizacion comercial modifico el mapa de la industria mundial. El mundo de hoy es diferente del de ayer. El Norte ya no domina al Sur de la misma manera. En el Sur hay grandes heterogeneidades entre los paises mas atrasados, los emergentes asiaticos y latinoamericanos, etc. Algunos paises del Sur han llegado a imponer sus propias reglas de juego. Pero no todas las economias emergentes del Sur tienen la misma capacidad para imponerse, como las de America Latina. Estas se benefician temporalmente del alto crecimiento de Asia, pero experimentan un proceso de desindustrializacion que las debilita. Algunas teorias y herramientas analiticas se han vuelto obsoletas o erroneas, como el enfoque centro-periferia. Paises que ayer pertenecian a la periferia, han adquirido caracteristicas del antiguo centro e incluso ejercen control sobre paises desarrollados.

4 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In the South there are large heterogeneities between developing countries, the emerging Asian and Latin American countries, etc. as mentioned in this paper The new commercial globalization changed the map of the global industry and some countries in the South have come to impose their own rules.
Abstract: The new commercial globalization changed the map of the global industry. Today’s world is different from yesterday. North does not dominate South in the same way. In the South there are large heterogeneities between developing countries, the emerging Asian and Latin American countries, etc. Some countries in the South have come to impose their own rules. However, not all emerging economies in the South have the same capacity prevail, as Latin America. Some Asian countries benefit temporarily from high growth, but experience a process of deindustrialization that weakens them. Some theories and analytical tools have become outdated or inaccurate, such as the center-periphery approach. Countries that yesterday belonged to the periphery have acquired characteristics of the old center and even exercise control over developed countries.

3 citations

19 Nov 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluate the effect of trade liberalization on GDP growth in emerging Latin-American countries and draw a connection between the growing economic openness and the emergence of new actors, especially Latin-Americans and Asians.
Abstract: Development strategies based on trade liberalization have not produced higher growth rates in emerging Latin-American countries. In fact, this rate has been, in average, lower then it was between 1955 and 1980, a period characterized by high protectionism and low economic openness. The first part of the article evaluates the effect of trade liberalization on GDP growth. The relationship of growth strategies and the changing world order is drawn on a second part. Today’s world is different from the past. In many ways, it is happening now what was unthinkable some time ago: North cannot dominate South as it did before. The very South is deeply heterogeneous: the last developed countries, emerging Asian countries and Latin-American countries are very different and their influences are not the same. Some of those southern countries, mainly the Asian ones, are trying to make their own rules for they are creditors of North’s debts. It is possible now to weigh the relationship between the growing economic openness and the emergence of new actors, especially Latin-Americans and Asians. Key words: globalization, development strategies, emerging countries. Classificacao JEL F5; O1; L11 Artigo recebido em maio 2012 e aceito para publicacao em jun. 2012.

2 citations