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Dennis Sewell

Bio: Dennis Sewell is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Eugenics & Ideology. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 10 citations.
Topics: Eugenics, Ideology, Human rights, Darwinism, Racialism

Papers
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Book
06 Nov 2009
TL;DR: Sewell as discussed by the authors examines how scientists and politicians have sought to use Darwin's ideas to solve social problems, or to bolster political ideologies, and concludes that the gene is set to become more political than ever before.
Abstract: With the publication of The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man, Charles Darwin not only sparked a revolution in science, but also radically changed the way millions of people thought about themselves, their societies and their values. The evolutionary science he gave birth to acquired a political dimension from the outset, and one with a deeply troubling and ongoing impact on the world in which we live. The Political Gene examines how scientists and politicians have sought to use Darwin's ideas to solve social problems, or to bolster political ideologies. Social Darwinism, eugenics and scientific racialism whose adherents have all claimed Charles Darwin as their inspiration became associated with some of the darkest episodes in our recent past. Dennis Sewell follows the thread of theory and the historical footprints left by a myriad cast of key characters to tell an often shocking and sometimes heartbreaking story. Sewell's narrative shows us what drove people to put a black man on display in a zoo, forcibly sterilize a pair of innocent teenage sisters, lock up a British girl for eighteen years for a petty theft, murder disabled people in Nazi Germany, and slam shut America's 'Golden Door'. Poverty and welfare, race and immigration, education, sexual equality and human rights are just some of the public policy areas to have felt the effects of Darwinian thought. Today, rapid advances in genetic and evolutionary science are once again placing Darwin's theories at the centre of some of the most bitterly contested cultural and political controversies. In the future, as the stakes for humanity are raised yet higher, the gene is set to become more political than ever before.

6 citations

Book
03 Jul 2001
TL;DR: Sewell as discussed by the authors explores today's Catholic community in all its social variety and traces the lineaments of a contemporary Catholic identity, from terraces of Celtic Park to the country houses of the old recusant families, from the Knights of Malta to the Catholic peace movement.
Abstract: In the course of the 20th century Britain's Catholics have made a long journey from the margins of society through gradual acceptance and respectability to positions of great influence and power in public life. Dennis Sewell charts that journey through the lives of the Catholic men and women whose voices, whether in politics, journalism, literature or the arts, have made a distinctively Catholic contribution to our national conversation. From the terraces of Celtic Park to the country houses of the old recusant families, from the Knights of Malta to the Catholic peace movement, the author explores today's Catholic community in all its social variety and traces the lineaments of a contemporary Catholic identity. Hilaire Belloc, G.K. Chesterton, Christopher Dawson, David Jones, Eric Gill, Ronald Knox, Edith Sitwell, Evelyn Waugh, Katherine Asquith, Tom Burns, Graham Greene, Barbara Ward, the Dowager Lady Hesketh, Paul Johnson, Hugo Young, Charles Moore, Cristina Odone, Lord Longford, Clare Short, Michael Portillo, Ann Widdecombe, Germaine Greer, Cardinals Hume and Winning, Michele Roberts, Mark Lawson, Harry Enfield and Richard Coles are among the many Catholics, cradle and convert, pious and "lapsed", who join this procession down the years. And what of Tony Blair? Why does he hesitate on the threshold of the Roman Church when so much of his "Third Way" agenda has moved on to ground already staked out by Catholic social teaching? What are the prospects for a Catholic revival? Is Catholicism merely a fashionable, nostalgic accessory, as its critics allege, or the only "ism" to have survived the 20th century intact?

4 citations


Cited by
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MonographDOI
01 Oct 2013
TL;DR: From creation to re-creation: nature and the naked ape 4. From image to likeness: Incarnation and theosis 5. From Adam and Eve to Mary and Christ: sin, redemption, atonement 6. From inspiration to sanctification: discerning the work of the Holy Spirit 7. From the Church to Mary: towards a critical ecumenism 8. From dogma to theoria: the Christian God Epilogue.
Abstract: Preface Introduction 1. From pondering Scripture to the first principles of Christian theology 2. From cosmology to doxology: reading Genesis alongside Plato and Darwin 3. From creation to re-creation: nature and the naked ape 4. From image to likeness: Incarnation and theosis 5. From Adam and Eve to Mary and Christ: sin, redemption, atonement 6. From inspiration to sanctification: discerning the work of the Holy Spirit 7. From the Church to Mary: towards a critical ecumenism 8. From dogma to theoria: the Christian God Epilogue.

68 citations

Book
16 Aug 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the savior of capitalism: the power of economic discourse, the mentors of the Holocaust and race science, and the protectors of nature: power of climate change research.
Abstract: Preface 1. Introduction 2. The savior of capitalism: the power of economic discourse 3. The mentors of the Holocaust and the power of race science 4. Protectors of nature: the power of climate change research 5. Conclusion Bibliography.

59 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: This article argued that the geographical structure of these islands has for millennia served to funnel interchange in an East/West direction, resulting in a deeply embedded cultural cleavage between the northern and southern regions of both Ireland and Great Britain.
Abstract: The paper criticises M.V. Heslinga's argument from the 1971 that the geographical structure of these islands has for millennia served to funnel interchange in an East/West direction, resulting in a deeply embedded cultural cleavage between the northern and southern regions of both Ireland and Great Britain.The paper argues that this type of geographical determinism lends itself to contemporary British/Ulster nationalism's case for the naturalness of partition. It goes on to argue that this mirrors the geographical determinism of Irish nationalism. Both nationalisms are said to use geography in support of political projects that are no longer fundamentally grounded on recent political events which themselves have been neither predictable nor inevitable.

15 citations

Book
15 Sep 2014
TL;DR: Aweful Augustine: sin, freedom and inscrutability 3.Inspirational Augustine: love, desire and knowledge 4. Anselm: will, omnipotence and responsibility 5. Augustine and Aristotle: the problem of Thomas Aquinas 6. Separating morality and salvation 7. The rise and fall of lopsided Augustinianism 8. Naturalism revised 9. Love, will and the moral sense 10. Radical revisionists: Hume, Kant and Rousseau 11. Atheist 'freedoms': liberal, totalitarian and nihilist 12. The
Abstract: Introduction 1. 'Will' and freedom, mind and love: some pre-Augustinian debates 2. Awe-ful Augustine: sin, freedom and inscrutability 3. Inspirational Augustine: love, desire and knowledge 4. Anselm: will, omnipotence and responsibility 5. Augustine and Aristotle: the problem of Thomas Aquinas 6. Separating morality and salvation 7. The rise and fall of lopsided Augustinianism 8. Naturalism revised 9. Love, will and the moral sense 10. Radical revisionists: Hume, Kant and Rousseau 11. Atheist 'freedoms': liberal, totalitarian and nihilist 12. The age of deception: virtual religion, virtual morality 13. Whither Lady Philosophy: muse, call girl or Valkyrie? 14. Reformed Augustine, genetically modified Adam.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the music used by the Orange Order, in its public parades, more commonly referred to as “Orange Walks,” and explored the extra-musical factors associated with Orangeism's most iconic song, "The Sash My Father Wore", how other groups have misappropriated the song, and how this has distorted its meaning and subsequent interpretation.
Abstract: This article examines the music used by the Orange Order, in its public parades, more commonly referred to as “Orange Walks.” The Orange Order is an exclusively Protestant fraternal organization, which traces its roots to 1690 and the victory of the Protestant Prince William of Orange over the Catholic King James. Yet, as in Northern Ireland, many consider the group to be sectarian and view its public celebrations as a display of ethno-religious triumphalism. This article explores the extra-musical factors associated with Orangeism’s most iconic song, “The Sash My Father Wore,” how other groups have misappropriated the song, and how this has distorted its meaning and subsequent interpretation. Recent statistics have shown that Glasgow hosts more Orange parades each year than in Belfast and Derry/Londonderry combined, yet while there have been many anthropological and ethnomusicological studies of Northern Ireland’s Orange parades, very little research has focused on similar traditions in Scotland. This article seeks to address that gap in the literature and is intended as a preparatory study, laying the groundwork for further analysis.

8 citations