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Desdemona McCANNON

Bio: Desdemona McCANNON is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7 citations.

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DissertationDOI
31 May 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.
Abstract: This thesis offers and evaluates collaborative writing practices for teams of Design students at M-Level in Higher Education (HE). The research begins by asking why writing is included in current art and design HE, and identifies an assumption about the role of writing across the sector derived from a misreading of the 1960 and 1970 Coldstream Reports. As a result, drawing on recommendations that were made in the Reports for non-studio studies to be complementary to art and design practice in HE, I focus on how teams of design students can complement their design skills with collaborative writing. Some studies for addressing how design students learn from writing in HE already exist, but none have established a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level. My research captures the effects of my Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops. I compare these with the most common writing model in HE designed for text-based study in the humanities. My APTs use participants' designerly strengths to redesign how they can use writing to complement their practice. This provides learners with a means of identifying and creating their own situated writing structures and practices. I document how my practice-centred APTs position collaborative writing practices as a designerly mode of communication between design practitioners working in teams. I show it to be more complementary to practice and so more effective in comparison to models imported from the humanities. My explorations are carried out through two thesis sections. Section One is an in-depth literature-based rationale that critically informs my investigations. Section Two presents my methodologies and reports three case studies, in which I explore the emergent data collected through a range of qualitative methods, mapping and evaluative techniques. The findings are of importance to those teaching M-Level design courses.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a series of changes involving collaboration, visualisation and audience presentation were incrementally added to a first year visual communication design theory course taught at the University of Newcastle, NSW.
Abstract: This study reports on a series of changes involving collaboration, visualisation and audience presentation which were incrementally added to a first year visual communication design theory course taught at the University of Newcastle, NSW. It will discuss novice, first year students' experience of collaborating with peers and also look at how visual media methods were used in the construction of a theoretical argument. It responds to previous observations that many of our students were not engaging with theory at a deep intrinsic level, writing essays that were motivated by the extrinsic demands of passing a course than actual fascination with the theoretical dimensions of design. In contrast, visual communication design students thrive in studio environments where collaboration and immersion in visual methods of working are the norm. We put forward here, the argued position that student learning of design theory can be enhanced through the incorporation of working methods commonly used in creative practice.

6 citations

05 Jul 2018
TL;DR: In this article, a case study of a visual communication honors research project that is indicative of those opportunities and the potential benefits of having highly skilled visual practitioners involved in human centered and service design processes is presented.
Abstract: Over the past 20 years there has been an increase in post-secondary visual communication education in Australia while the growth of the industry itself has been low, meaning an increasing number of graduates compete for a limited pool of jobs1. The use of visualisation in human centered and service design approaches provides alternative employment opportunities for these graduates. This paper presents a case study of a visual communication honors research project that is indicative of those opportunities and the potential benefits of having highly skilled visual practitioners involved in human centered and service design processes. Furthermore, we argue that a consideration of the aesthetics of the visualisation methods used in this context is essential and that visual aesthetics should be a significant part of the service design skillset.

4 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, a series of changes involving collaboration and visualisation were incrementally added to a first year design theory course taught at the university of Newcastle NSW, which can be defined as a form of deductive reasoning in that it seeks to uncover that which exists, as determined through close analytical reading of research literature.
Abstract: This study reports on a series of changes involving collaboration and visualisation which were incrementally added to a first year design theory course taught at the university of Newcastle NSW. Theory teaching values explicit knowledge and focuses on analytical and critical thinking. It can be defined as a form of deductive reasoning in that it seeks to unearth that which exists, as determined through close analytical reading of research literature. Students who study visual communication design do so because of their interest in creativity and visual media. Creative thinking and tacit knowledge are highly valued. It would therefore seem that design studio teaching, with its reliance on creativity, tacit knowledge and inductive or abductive reasoning is misaligned with design theory teaching which values explicit knowledge and deductive reasoning. However, this paper will argue that student learning of theory can be enhanced through the incorporation of working methods commonly used in creative practice.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that student learning of design theory and history can be enhanced when creative practice methods are employed within a critical studies context and that discourse in design education is no longer the exclusive domain of design education.
Abstract: This paper presents the outcomes of an action research inquiry that set out to enhance first year visual communication student learning of design theory and history through the incorporation of creative practice methods commonly used in practical design studio environments. As educators of both design theory and practice, our previous observations of how novice design students engaged with theory, compared to how they engaged with practice, led us to the decision that change was required to facilitate deeper understanding of theoretical discourse through the incorporation of creative practice methods. That was our ‘call to action’. The methods, described in the article as interventions, were introduced to support the critical and analytical thinking necessary to engage with theoretical discourse. They can also be thought of as learning strategies incorporated to enhance student learning and involved creative thinking exercises, visualization techniques, collaboration and audience presentation. Our findings demonstrate that student learning of design theory and history can be enhanced when creative practice methods are employed within a critical studies context and that discourse in design education is no longer the exclusive domain of

1 citations