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Dewa Gede Sidan Raeskyesa

Bio: Dewa Gede Sidan Raeskyesa is an academic researcher from Kiel Institute for the World Economy. The author has contributed to research in topics: Inequality & Economic inequality. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 21 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyze the effect of digitalization on economic growth in eight ASEAN middle-income countries from 1999 to 2014 and find that the usage and intensity of ICT have a higher impact than access to ICT, while human capital contributes the most among the other variables.
Abstract: Digitalization has become relevant nowadays, not only because of the exposure of new technologies but also the consideration of its impact on the economy. In that regard, this study aims to analyze the effect of digitalization on economic growth. This study uses a descriptive analysis of the eight ASEAN middle-income countries from 1999 to 2014 as well as panel regression analysis with the dependent variable of GDP per capita growth and independent variables of physical capital, human capital, and ICT indicators. As a result, ICT indicators have a significant positive impact on economic growth, along with physical and human capital. The usage and intensity of ICT have a higher impact than access to ICT. Furthermore, human capital contributes the most among the other variables. We recommend the countries invest more in human capital to utilize ICT because it is the quality of human capital that matters to navigate the era of the digital economy.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
29 Apr 2021
TL;DR: The result shows that manufacturing output contributes a significant and positive effect to the hotel and restaurant industry and there is a negative relationship between the growth of the agriculture and tourism sector, which is assumed due to the tradeoff in the factor of production between the agricultural and tourist sector development.
Abstract: This research explores the role of the tourism sector in Indonesia, including its backward and forward linkages with other economic sectors. The tourism sector is represented by the hotel and restaurant (hospitality) industry. The study uses the input-output method and traces the econometric backward and forward shocks of the tourism sector with the Error Correction Model (ECM), using database from Statistics Indonesia from 2010 to 2019. The paper contributes to the existing literature by using multi-stage quantitative processes to observe backward and forward economic linkages. The result shows that manufacturing output contributes a significant and positive effect to the hotel and restaurant industry. At the same time, the tourism sector provides a significant and positive contribution to government retribution. Nonetheless, there is a negative relationship between the growth of the agriculture and tourism sector, which is assumed due to the tradeoff in the factor of production between the agricultural and tourism sector development. Consequently, backward and forward relationships suggest more holistic and prudent economic policies for observing interdependent tourism development in Indonesia's other economic sectors.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the effect of competitiveness and foreign direct investment (FDI) was investigated by using Pearson correlation and panel data analysis, and the fixed effect and random effect models were applied, followed by the Hausman test.
Abstract: Purpose: The goal of this study is to investigate the empirical effect between competitiveness and FDI inflow in ASEAN member countries over the period 2007-2017. Design/methodology/approach: The effect of competitiveness and foreign direct investment (FDI) was investigated by using Pearson correlation and panel data analysis. The fixed effect and random effect models were applied, followed by the Hausman test, which led us to use the fixed effect model. Finding: The study revealed that the majority of ASEAN countries have a strong and positive association between competitiveness and the FDI inflow. Specifically, variable institutions, market size, health, and primary education had a significant effect on attracting inward foreign direct investment in the region. Research limitations/implications: In order to attract more foreign direct investment, it is highly suggested the ASEAN countries enhance their institution quality and improve the human capital through health and basic education. Originality/value: Our study enriches the literature on globalization and competitiveness by focusing on the regional empirical effect between each variable from the Global Competitiveness Index and the FDI inflow exclusively in countries within the ASEAN region.

7 citations

DOI
19 Feb 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the characteristics of the local economy in Balinese regencies and identify the potential sectors to be developed therein using such methodologies as Klassen Typology, Location Quotient, Growth-Ratio Model, and Overlay analysis from year 2010 to 2016.
Abstract: In decentralization system, understanding the characteristics of region’s economy becomes necessary for productivity. In that regard, this descriptive study aims to describe the characteristics of the local economy in Balinese regencies and to identify the potential sectors to be developed therein. Using such methodologies as Klassen Typology, Location Quotient, Growth-Ratio Model, and Overlay analysis from year 2010 to 2016. As a result, we have found significant gap amongst regencies, where Badung and Denpasar are the most developed regencies, with high level both in growth rate and GDP per Capita. On the other hand, Klungkung, Jembrana, Bangli, Karangasem, and Tabanan are the least developed. Furthermore, it was found that most sectors in Bali are experiencing slow growth during the research period. By studying all the regencies in Bali province, this study not only enrich the existing literature but also recommend potential sectors from each region to be developed in order to reduce the development gap between regencies.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explored the relationship between growth in economic sectors, especially manufacturing, service, and agriculture, towards income inequality and showed that the share of agricultural sector in GDP has a significant and negative relationship with income inequality.
Abstract: This paper aims to explore the relationship between growth in economic sectors, especially manufacturing, service, and agriculture, towards income inequality. Furthermore, it utilizes panel data for low-middle income ASEAN countries. The result shows that the share of agricultural sector in GDP has a significant and negative relationship with income inequality. In fact, the effect is robust for the incorporation of control variables. Therefore, it underlines the importance of agricultural sector development for reducing inequality and also for fostering ASEAN economic integration.

1 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Thank you very much for reading input output analysis foundations and extensions, as many people have search hundreds of times for their chosen readings like this, but end up in infectious downloads.
Abstract: Thank you very much for reading input output analysis foundations and extensions. As you may know, people have search hundreds times for their chosen readings like this input output analysis foundations and extensions, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they are facing with some malicious virus inside their desktop computer.

1,316 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future by Joseph E. Stiglitz and Paul R. Krugman as mentioned in this paper is a good summary of the main themes of the book.
Abstract: The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 414 pages, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.I LOVE THESE GUYS''(Joseph Stiglitz) is an insanely great economist,'' so writes Paul R. Krugman, who should know. These two like to write books for the populace at large on the topic of macroeconomics. Krugman also likes to spout offon Sunday news shows like ''Meet the Press,'' and on all the cable news programs. You can see Krugman arguing with Bill O'Reilly on Meet the Press. From YouTube: ''Don't call me a liar, pal, that's what you do all the time,'' says O'Reilly; ''This is not your show, so you can't cut offmy mic,'' says Krugman. Judging by their expressions, I was glad Tim Russert (6- 3-) was there in the studio at the time to protect Krugman (5- 7-) (O'Reilly stands 6- 4-). Conservative pundits dislike both economists, but pretty much leave Stiglitz alone.Krugman makes it a point to stay out of government affairs. Stiglitz does just the opposite, and he sometimes gets burned. Stiglitz was part of Bill Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers and was Chief Economist for the World Bank. After much criticism of the way the International Monetary Fund (IMF) conducted lending to developing countries, he was pretty much fired from the World Bank. Comparing the two, you would have to say that Stiglitz is more the bleeding heart, while Krugman says that what he dislikes most is the dishonesty he sees in political-economic discourse. Both are champions of the common man.Since Stiglitz can make the very valid claim for being ''an insanely great economist,'' most everything he says in his books should be taken seriously. There are some real gems in this book. I especially like the perspective he lends to some of the more peculiar things that happened before, during, and after the financial crisis. People hear about these things in the news from some announcer who makes them sound like just more news-bites, but they are, after all, unprecedented (and largely absurd). Take ''robo-signing'' for instance (page 198).WHAT GOES FOR NEWSRobo-signing was part of what happened during the foreclosure process after the massive numbers of defaults of subprime mortgages. Big banks intentionally did not follow mandated law. Apart from ignoring debtors' rights, an ensuing mess followed. Robo-signing was nothing less than a blatant attempt at rewriting property law, and resulted in lying to the courts about the state of each property's title, literally hundreds of times. No bank officer was charged with a crime. By contrast, the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s led to 829 individual convictions and 650 prison sentences. Nowadays the big banks just pay fines as part of settlements where they admit no guilt, and it's just part of doing business.Take algorithmic or ''flash'' trading in the stock exchanges (page 164). These are buys and sales made in nanoseconds on the basis of extracting information from the patterns of prices and trades. Nothing like real information gathered through market research on an industry, or on a firm in a certain industry, backs up these trades. But traders swear that ''price discovery'' is happening this way, and that all this backs up the efficient markets model. So on May 6, 2010 stock prices plummeted to a point where the Dow Jones temporarily lost 10% of its value. There are reasons to believe that these trades ''make markets not just more volatile but also less 'informative' '' (page 166). Still, the talk on the street is all about efficient markets (echoing Alan Greenspan's failures at the Federal Reserve).Take failed privatizations. When electric power in California was liberalized and Enron manipulated prices and public power to its advantage, this was a story about the company's accounting practices, not about privatizing something that had no business being privatized. …

855 citations

Book
01 Aug 2010
TL;DR: The International Economics: Theory and Policy by Suranovic as mentioned in this paper is built on the belief that students need to learn the theory and models to understand how economics works and how economists understand the world and that these ideas are accessible to most students if they are explained thoroughly.
Abstract: International Economics: Theory and Policy is built on Steve Suranovic’s belief that students need to learn the theory and models to understand how economics works and how economists understand the world And, that these ideas are accessible to most students if they are explained thoroughlySo, if you are looking for an International Economics text that will prepare your PhD students while promoting serious comprehension for the non-economics major, Steve Suranovic’s International Economics: Theory and Policy is for you International Economics: Theory and Policy presents numerous models in some detail; not by employing advanced mathematics, but rather by walking students through a detailed description of how a model’s assumptions influence its conclusions Then, students learn how the models connect with the real world Steve’s book covers positive economics to help answer the normative questions; for example, what should a country do about trade policy, or about exchange rate policy? The results from models give students insights that help us answer these questions Thus, this text strives to explain why each model is interesting by connecting its results to some aspect of a current policy issue This text eliminates some needlessly difficult material while adding and elaborating on other principles For example, the development of the relative supply/demand structure, or the presentation of offer curves, are omitted as to not go too deeply into topics that tend to confuse many students at this level Steve developed new approaches in this text including a simple way to present the Jones’ magnification effects, a systematic method to teach the theory of the second best, and a unique description of valid reasons to worry about trade deficits These new approaches help students learn the concepts and models and derive conclusions from them If you like to take a comprehensive look at trade policies, be sure to check out the chapter on Trade Policy (7) It provides a comprehensive look at many more trade policies than are found in many of the printed textbooks on the market todayInternational Economics: Theory and Policy by Steve Suranovic is intended for use in a full semester trade course, a full semester finance course, or a one semester trade/finance course

313 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the empirical validity of the tourism-led growth hypothesis in the top ten tourist destinations in the world (China, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United States) using the quantile-on-quantile (QQ) approach and a new index of tourism activity that combines the most commonly used tourism indicators.
Abstract: This paper examines the empirical validity of the tourism-led growth hypothesis in the top ten tourist destinations in the world (China, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States) using the quantile-on-quantile (QQ) approach and a new index of tourism activity that combines the most commonly used tourism indicators. This methodology, recently introduced by Sim and Zhou (2015), provides an ideal framework with which to capture the overall dependence structure between tourism development and economic growth. The empirical results primarily show a positive relation between tourism and economic growth for the ten countries considered with substantial variations across countries and across quantiles within each country. The weakest links are noted for China and Germany, possibly because of the limited importance of the tourism sector relative to other major economic activities in those countries. Important country-specific policy implications may be drawn from these findings.

87 citations