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Dieter T. Hessel

Bio: Dieter T. Hessel is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Solidarity & Temperance movement. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 918 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Solidarity is a promising ethical norm that helps focus the church's social involvement as mentioned in this paper, and it has biblical-theological resonance and it bridges the gap between theologies of liberation and reconciliation.
Abstract: Solidarity is a promising ethical norm that helps focus the church's social involvement. This norm has biblical-theological resonance and it bridges the gap between theologies of liberation and theologies of reconciliation. Solidarity ethics affirms the equal worth of human beings in God's creation; advocates the rights of all who struggle for freedom; seeks justice for those who lack abundant life; and expects a unity of effort to achieve systemic change.

2 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a comparison between two national surveys conducted in 1975 and 1985 on the rates of physical violence against children and spouses is presented, showing that physical child abuse decreased by 47% from 1975 to 1985; wife beating decreased by 27% while severe assaults declined by 4.3%.
Abstract: Comparisons between two national surveys conducted in 1975 and 1985 on the rates of physical violence against children and spouses are presented in this article. The sample consisted of 2143 families in 1975 and 3520 families in 1985. Findings showed that 1) physical child abuse decreased by 47% from 1975 to 1985; 2) wife beating decreased by 27% while severe assaults declined by 4.3%; and 3) despite these reductions the rates of child abuse and wife beating remain extremely high. The lower rates of severe violence in 1985 are attributed to several factors such as 1) differences in methodology used 2) reluctance of the respondents to report violence and 3) a decrease in the amount of child abuse and wife beating. The policy implications of the reductions and of the continued high rate of child and spouse abuse were discussed in the last part of this paper.

1,692 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a theory of human communication based on a conception of persons as homo narrans is proposed, and the viability of the narrative paradigm and its attendant notions of reason and rationality are demonstrated through an extended analysis of key aspects of the current nuclear war controversy and a brief application to The Epic of Gilgamesh.
Abstract: This essay proposes a theory of human communication based on a conception of persons as homo narrans. It compares and contrasts this view with the traditional rational perspective on symbolic interaction. The viability of the narrative paradigm and its attendant notions of reason and rationality are demonstrated through an extended analysis of key aspects of the current nuclear war controversy and a brief application to The Epic of Gilgamesh. The narrative paradigm synthesizes two strands in rhetorical theory: the argumentative, persuasive theme and the literary, aesthetic theme.

1,546 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of the literatures on countermovements and political opportunity is presented, arguing that this interaction increases when states enable but do not satisfy challengers, and presenting a general framework of theoretical propositions for understanding the interplay of movements and their opponents.
Abstract: Movement-countermovement interaction is an ongoing feature of contemporary social movements and, indeed, of contemporary politics. Yet the interplay of contending movements is understudied and undertheorized. This article begins to remedy this deficit by arguing that new work on political opportunity structure provides important insights and significant theoretical leverage for this study. Through a review of the literatures on countermovements and political opportunity, this article argues that this interaction increases when states enable but do not satisfy challengers. This article presents a general framework of theoretical propositions for understanding the interplay of movements and their opponents to animate and guide subsequent research.

1,059 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Part of the courts, criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons.
Abstract: How does access to this work benefit you? Let us know! Follow this and additional works at: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/jj_pubs Part of the Courts Commons, Criminal Law Commons, Criminal Procedure Commons, Criminology Commons, Judges Commons, Law and Politics Commons, Law and Society Commons, Law Enforcement and Corrections Commons, Legislation Commons, Politics and Social Change Commons, and the Race and Ethnicity Commons

916 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on norms that prohibit, both in international law and in the domestic criminal laws of states, the involvement of state and nonstate actors in activities such as piracy, slavery, counterfeiting, drug trafficking, the hijacking of aircraft, and the killing of endangered animal species.
Abstract: The dynamics by which norms emerge and spread in international society have been the subject of strikingly little study. This article focuses on norms that prohibit, both in international law and in the domestic criminal laws of states, the involvement of state and nonstate actors in activities such as piracy, slavery, counterfeiting, drug trafficking, the hijacking of aircraft, and the killing of endangered animal species. It analyzes the manner in which these norms have evolved into and been institutionalized by global prohibition regimes and argues that there are two principal inducements to the formation and promotion of such regimes. The first is the inadequacy of unilateral and bilateral law enforcement measures in the face of criminal activities that transcend national borders. The second is the role of moral and emotional factors related to neither political nor economic advantage but instead involving religious beliefs, humanitarian sentiments, fears, prejudices, paternalism, faith in universalism, the individual conscience, and the compulsion to proselytize. The ultimate success or failure of an international regime in effectively suppressing a particular activity depends, however, not only on the degree of commitment to its norms or the extent of resources devoted to carrying out its goals but also on the vulnerability of the activity to its enforcement measures.

792 citations