scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Dimitar Dimitrov

Bio: Dimitar Dimitrov is an academic researcher from University of Bergen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Monophyly & Genus. The author has an hindex of 24, co-authored 62 publications receiving 3250 citations. Previous affiliations of Dimitar Dimitrov include University of Barcelona & University of Copenhagen.
Topics: Monophyly, Genus, Pholcus, Pholcidae, Sister group


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
04 Jan 2013-Science
TL;DR: A global map of zoogeographic regions is generated by combining data on the distributions and phylogenetic relationships of 21,037 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals, and it is shown that spatial turnover in the phylogenetic composition of vertebrate assemblages is higher in the Southern than in the Northern Hemisphere.
Abstract: Modern attempts to produce biogeographic maps focus on the distribution of species, and the maps are typically drawn without phylogenetic considerations. Here, we generate a global map of zoogeographic regions by combining data on the distributions and phylogenetic relationships of 21,037 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals. We identify 20 distinct zoogeographic regions, which are grouped into 11 larger realms. We document the lack of support for several regions previously defined based on distributional data and show that spatial turnover in the phylogenetic composition of vertebrate assemblages is higher in the Southern than in the Northern Hemisphere. We further show that the integration of phylogenetic information provides valuable insight on historical relationships among regions, permitting the identification of evolutionarily unique regions of the world.

1,014 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results show that rodents experienced shifts in diversification rate regularly through the Tertiary, but at different periods for each clade, and suggest that extinction led to the loss of diversification signal for most of the Paleogene nodes.
Abstract: Development of phylogenetic methods that do not rely on fossils for the study of evolutionary processes through time have revolutionized the field of evolutionary biology and resulted in an unprecedented expansion of our knowledge about the tree of life. These methods have helped to shed light on the macroevolution of many taxonomic groups such as the placentals (Mammalia). However, despite the increase of studies addressing the diversification patterns of organisms, no synthesis has addressed the case of the most diversified mammalian clade: the Rodentia. Here we present a rodent maximum likelihood phylogeny inferred from a molecular supermatrix. It is based on 11 mitochondrial and nuclear genes that covers 1,265 species, i.e., respectively 56% and 81% of the known specific and generic rodent diversity. The inferred topology recovered all Rodentia clades proposed by recent molecular works. A relaxed molecular clock dating approach provided a time framework for speciation events. We found that the Myomorpha clade shows a greater degree of variation in diversification rates than Sciuroidea, Caviomorpha, Castorimorpha and Anomaluromorpha. We identified a number of shifts in diversification rates within the major clades: two in Castorimorpha, three in Ctenohystrica, 6 within the squirrel-related clade and 24 in the Myomorpha clade. The majority of these shifts occurred within the most recent familial rodent radiations: the Cricetidae and Muridae clades. Using the topological imbalances and the time line we discuss the potential role of different diversification factors that might have shaped the rodents radiation. The present glimpse on the diversification pattern of rodents can be used for further comparative meta-analyses. Muroid lineages have a greater degree of variation in their diversification rates than any other rodent group. Different topological signatures suggest distinct diversification processes among rodent lineages. In particular, Muroidea and Sciuroidea display widespread distribution and have undergone evolutionary and adaptive radiation on most of the continents. Our results show that rodents experienced shifts in diversification rate regularly through the Tertiary, but at different periods for each clade. A comparison between the rodent fossil record and our results suggest that extinction led to the loss of diversification signal for most of the Paleogene nodes.

388 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A phylogenetic analysis of spiders using a dataset of 932 spider species, representing 115 families (only the family Synaphridae is unrepresented), 700 known genera, and additional representatives of 26 unidentified or undescribed genera is presented.

335 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: How application of a more rigorous definition of cryptic species in taxonomic practice will lead to more accurate estimates of their prevalence in nature, better understanding of their distribution patterns on the tree of life, and increased abilities to resolve the processes underlying their evolution are discussed.
Abstract: Cryptic species could represent a substantial fraction of biodiversity. However, inconsistent definitions and taxonomic treatment of cryptic species prevent informed estimates of their contribution to biodiversity and impede our understanding of their evolutionary and ecological significance. We propose a conceptual framework that recognizes cryptic species based on their low levels of phenotypic (morphological) disparity relative to their degree of genetic differentiation and divergence times as compared with non-cryptic species. We discuss how application of a more rigorous definition of cryptic species in taxonomic practice will lead to more accurate estimates of their prevalence in nature, better understanding of their distribution patterns on the tree of life, and increased abilities to resolve the processes underlying their evolution.

287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 May 2007-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: A fluorescent protein voltage sensor with superior targeting to the mammalian plasma membrane and high responsiveness to membrane potential signaling in excitable cells is reported, likely to lead to new methods of monitoring electrically active cells with cell type specificity, non-invasively and in large numbers, simultaneously.
Abstract: Background Fluorescent proteins have been used to generate a variety of biosensors to optically monitor biological phenomena in living cells. Among this class of genetically encoded biosensors, reporters for membrane potential have been a particular challenge. The use of presently known voltage sensor proteins is limited by incorrect subcellular localization and small or absent voltage responses in mammalian cells. Results Here we report on a fluorescent protein voltage sensor with superior targeting to the mammalian plasma membrane and high responsiveness to membrane potential signaling in excitable cells. Conclusions and Significance This biosensor, which we termed VSFP2.1, is likely to lead to new methods of monitoring electrically active cells with cell type specificity, non-invasively and in large numbers, simultaneously.

196 citations


Cited by
More filters
28 Jul 2005
TL;DR: PfPMP1)与感染红细胞、树突状组胞以及胎盘的单个或多个受体作用,在黏附及免疫逃避中起关键的作�ly.
Abstract: 抗原变异可使得多种致病微生物易于逃避宿主免疫应答。表达在感染红细胞表面的恶性疟原虫红细胞表面蛋白1(PfPMP1)与感染红细胞、内皮细胞、树突状细胞以及胎盘的单个或多个受体作用,在黏附及免疫逃避中起关键的作用。每个单倍体基因组var基因家族编码约60种成员,通过启动转录不同的var基因变异体为抗原变异提供了分子基础。

18,940 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The structure, evolution, and function of GFP-like proteins and their numerous applications for in vivo imaging are focused on, with particular attention to recent techniques.
Abstract: Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and its homologs from diverse marine animals are widely used as universal genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Many laboratories have focused their efforts on identification and development of fluorescent proteins with novel characteristics and enhanced properties, resulting in a powerful toolkit for visualization of structural organization and dynamic processes in living cells and organisms. The diversity of currently available fluorescent proteins covers nearly the entire visible spectrum, providing numerous alternative possibilities for multicolor labeling and studies of protein interactions. Photoactivatable fluorescent proteins enable tracking of photolabeled molecules and cells in space and time and can also be used for super-resolution imaging. Genetically encoded sensors make it possible to monitor the activity of enzymes and the concentrations of various analytes. Fast-maturing fluorescent proteins, cell clocks, and timers further expand the options for real time studies in living tissues. Here we focus on the structure, evolution, and function of GFP-like proteins and their numerous applications for in vivo imaging, with particular attention to recent techniques.

1,214 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Guojie Zhang1, Guojie Zhang2, Cai Li2, Qiye Li2, Bo Li2, Denis M. Larkin3, Chul Hee Lee4, Jay F. Storz5, Agostinho Antunes6, Matthew J. Greenwold7, Robert W. Meredith8, Anders Ödeen9, Jie Cui10, Qi Zhou11, Luohao Xu2, Hailin Pan2, Zongji Wang12, Lijun Jin2, Pei Zhang2, Haofu Hu2, Wei Yang2, Jiang Hu2, Jin Xiao2, Zhikai Yang2, Yang Liu2, Qiaolin Xie2, Hao Yu2, Jinmin Lian2, Ping Wen2, Fang Zhang2, Hui Li2, Yongli Zeng2, Zijun Xiong2, Shiping Liu12, Long Zhou2, Zhiyong Huang2, Na An2, Jie Wang13, Qiumei Zheng2, Yingqi Xiong2, Guangbiao Wang2, Bo Wang2, Jingjing Wang2, Yu Fan14, Rute R. da Fonseca1, Alonzo Alfaro-Núñez1, Mikkel Schubert1, Ludovic Orlando1, Tobias Mourier1, Jason T. Howard15, Ganeshkumar Ganapathy15, Andreas R. Pfenning15, Osceola Whitney15, Miriam V. Rivas15, Erina Hara15, Julia Smith15, Marta Farré3, Jitendra Narayan16, Gancho T. Slavov16, Michael N Romanov17, Rui Borges6, João Paulo Machado6, Imran Khan6, Mark S. Springer18, John Gatesy18, Federico G. Hoffmann19, Juan C. Opazo20, Olle Håstad21, Roger H. Sawyer7, Heebal Kim4, Kyu-Won Kim4, Hyeon Jeong Kim4, Seoae Cho4, Ning Li22, Yinhua Huang22, Michael William Bruford23, Xiangjiang Zhan13, Andrew Dixon, Mads F. Bertelsen24, Elizabeth P. Derryberry25, Wesley C. Warren26, Richard K. Wilson26, Shengbin Li27, David A. Ray19, Richard E. Green28, Stephen J. O'Brien29, Darren K. Griffin17, Warren E. Johnson30, David Haussler28, Oliver A. Ryder, Eske Willerslev1, Gary R. Graves31, Per Alström21, Jon Fjeldså32, David P. Mindell33, Scott V. Edwards34, Edward L. Braun35, Carsten Rahbek32, David W. Burt36, Peter Houde37, Yong Zhang2, Huanming Yang38, Jian Wang2, Erich D. Jarvis15, M. Thomas P. Gilbert1, M. Thomas P. Gilbert39, Jun Wang 
12 Dec 2014-Science
TL;DR: This work explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades to reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.
Abstract: Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.

872 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
13 Mar 2008-Neuron
TL;DR: Progress in the genetic analysis of neural circuits is reviewed and directions for future research and development are discussed, including genetic approaches to nongenetic systems such as primates.

809 citations