scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Dimitrios E. Bakaloudis

Bio: Dimitrios E. Bakaloudis is an academic researcher from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The author has contributed to research in topics: Population & Habitat. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 50 publications receiving 379 citations. Previous affiliations of Dimitrios E. Bakaloudis include Swiss Ornithological Institute & Technological Educational Institute of Kavala.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the distribution of reptiles over nine different habitat types with a view to assessing the importance of these habitats for foraging by short-toed eagles Circaetus gallicus.
Abstract: The area surrounding and including Dadia Forest, north-eastern Greece, is well known for its diversity of breeding raptors, including many species of conservation concern. Dadia Forest has been exploited by humans for many centuries, but more recent social and economic changes have stimulated proposals that the forest should be subject to habitat management to protect the fauna of the region. We examined the distribution of reptiles over nine different habitat types with a view to assessing the importance of these habitats for foraging by short-toed eagles Circaetus gallicus, In addition, data on the diet of the species were collected from direct observations at nests. The short-toed eagle relies heavily on snakes for food. The most important prey species was the grass snake Natrix natrix, although the Montpellier snake Malpolon monspessulanus and large whip snake Coluber jugularis also featured prominently as prey items at certain nests. Montpellier snakes and large whip snakes were distributed across all habitat types, but grass snakes were concentrated in areas of mainly intensive, but also non-intensive, cultivation. Analysis showed that short-toed eagles concentrated their foraging efforts in three habitat types: intensive and non-intensive cultivation and grasslands. Grass snakes were abundant on cultivated land but relatively scarce on grassland. Forested areas were largely avoided by foraging eagles. The data show that for the short-toed eagle the distribution and abundance of prey items on the ground does not reflect food availability. The possible effect of changes in habitat management on the short-toed eagle population in Dadia is discussed, in particular the establishment of exclusion zones that could result in progressive canopy closure.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate the effect of habitat structure on the presence of the turtledove in Dadia-Lefkimi-Soufli National Park (DLS NP).
Abstract: Forested areas provide important breeding habitats for the turtledove (Streptopelia turtur) in Dadia-Lefkimi-Soufli National Park, Northeastern Greece. We censused the birds in two forested habitat types using the point-count technique at 60 sites during the breeding season (from mid-April to mid-June) in 2001 and 2002. We sampled vegetation structure at the same sites by measuring horizontal (tree species and density in different size classes) and vertical (percentage canopy closure in dominant, intermediate, suppressed and shrub layer) characteristics within 0.04 ha circular plots centred on the established points. Univariate and multivariate statistical techniques were employed to examine the response of the turtledove′s presence to habitat differences between used and unused sites. The results of this study indicate that habitat structure influence the presence of the turtledove during the breeding season. Middle-aged forest stands particularly those dominated by pine trees with low percentage cover in understory are likely to be beneficial to breeding the turtledove population. A combination of multipurpose forestry operations allowing development of managed woodland in mosaics with other habitat types could provide high-quality habitats for a wide range of wildlife species including game and non-game species in the area. Silvicultural methods of maintaining appropriate breeding habitat for turtledove in Dadia-Lefkimi-Soufli National Park (DLS NP), which are in conflict with commercial forestry, are discussed.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that the European turtle dove is prone to undergo demographic fluctuations, a trait that makes it sensitive to anthropogenic impacts, especially when its numbers are decreasing.
Abstract: Understanding how past climatic oscillations have affected organismic evolution will help predict the impact that current climate change has on living organisms. The European turtle dove, Streptopelia turtur, is a warm-temperature adapted species and a long distance migrant that uses multiple flyways to move between Europe and Africa. Despite being abundant, it is categorized as vulnerable because of a long-term demographic decline. We studied the demographic history and population genetic structure of the European turtle dove using genomic data and mitochondrial DNA sequences from individuals sampled across Europe, and performing paleoclimatic niche modelling simulations. Overall our data suggest that this species is panmictic across Europe, and is not genetically structured across flyways. We found the genetic signatures of demographic fluctuations, inferring an effective population size (Ne) expansion that occurred between the late Pleistocene and early Holocene, followed by a decrease in the Ne that started between the mid Holocene and the present. Our niche modelling analyses suggest that the variations in the Ne are coincident with recent changes in the availability of suitable habitat. We argue that the European turtle dove is prone to undergo demographic fluctuations, a trait that makes it sensitive to anthropogenic impacts, especially when its numbers are decreasing. Also, considering the lack of genetic structure, we suggest all populations across Europe are equally relevant for conservation.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyzed diet data in a Long-legged Buzzard Buteo rufinus population using four different methods (direct observations, pellets, prey remains and combined pellets and prey remains) from Cyprus, during 2005-2007.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Seasonal variation in diet and feeding strategies was evident and linked to seasonal nutritional requirements, but possibly imposed by strong interference competition and intraguild predation.
Abstract: Stone martens (Martes foina) are documented as generalist throughout their distributional range whose diet composition is affected by food availability. We tested if this occurs and what feeding strategies it follows in a typical Mediterranean ecosystem in Central Greece by analysing contents from 106 stomachs, seasonally collected from three different habitats during 2003–2006. Seasonal variation in diet and feeding strategies was evident and linked to seasonal nutritional requirements, but possibly imposed by strong interference competition and intraguild predation. Fleshy fruits and arthropods predominated in the diet, but also mammals and birds were frequently consumed. An overall low dietary niche breadth (𝐵A=0.128) indicated a fruit specialization tendency. A generalised diet occurred in spring with high individual specialisation, whereas more animal-type prey was consumed than fruits. A population specialization towards fruits was indicated during summer and autumn, whereas insects were consumed occasionally by males. In those seasons it switched to more clumped food types such as fruits and insects. In winter it selectively exploited both adult and larvae insects and partially fruits overwinter on plants. The tendency to consume particular prey items seasonally reflected both the population specialist behaviour and the individual flexibility preyed on different food resources.

23 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: For the next few weeks the course is going to be exploring a field that’s actually older than classical population genetics, although the approach it’ll be taking to it involves the use of population genetic machinery.
Abstract: So far in this course we have dealt entirely with the evolution of characters that are controlled by simple Mendelian inheritance at a single locus. There are notes on the course website about gametic disequilibrium and how allele frequencies change at two loci simultaneously, but we didn’t discuss them. In every example we’ve considered we’ve imagined that we could understand something about evolution by examining the evolution of a single gene. That’s the domain of classical population genetics. For the next few weeks we’re going to be exploring a field that’s actually older than classical population genetics, although the approach we’ll be taking to it involves the use of population genetic machinery. If you know a little about the history of evolutionary biology, you may know that after the rediscovery of Mendel’s work in 1900 there was a heated debate between the “biometricians” (e.g., Galton and Pearson) and the “Mendelians” (e.g., de Vries, Correns, Bateson, and Morgan). Biometricians asserted that the really important variation in evolution didn’t follow Mendelian rules. Height, weight, skin color, and similar traits seemed to

9,847 citations