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Dino Murtic

Bio: Dino Murtic is an academic researcher from University of South Australia. The author has contributed to research in topics: Demilitarisation & Barbarism. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 4 publications receiving 12 citations.

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BookDOI
01 Jan 2015

8 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The absence of women's voices presents a significant emptiness in European filmic and general historiography, and women's perspectives and discursive stances on the Western Balkans are blurred, not taken into account due to their "irrelevance" or simply ignored as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The absence of women’s voices presents a significant emptiness in European filmic and general historiography. Post-Yugoslav territories fit perfectly with the ‘Old Continent’s’ paradigm of the distant and even recent past. With a few exceptions, which only confirm the rule of general absence, women’s perspectives and discursive stances on the Western Balkans are blurred, not taken into account due to their ‘irrelevance’, or simply ignored. Consequently, no-one should be surprised at my stating that the absence of women’s perspectives in creating knowledge about the Western Balkans is both ethically and epistemologically problematic. Without knowing the role of women in the post-Yugoslav past and present, we are not in position to create a valid epistemological knowledge (Slapsak 2009). And only with plural perceptions of an event may we strive towards the ‘universal’ (Balibar 2007).

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: Murtic as discussed by the authors examines the contemporary post-Yugoslav war film, contextualizing it historically, and in light of the emergence of new film paradigms across post Yugoslav territories, wherein films are characterised by a rediscovered nationalism and a sense of victimhood, or the confirmation of stereotypes of barbarism and violence.
Abstract: This chapter examines the contemporary post-Yugoslav war film, contextualising it historically, and in light of the emergence of new film paradigms across post-Yugoslav territories. Tendencies such as the cinemas of ‘self-victimisation’ or ‘self-Balkanisation’ described by Jurica Pavicic (Postjugoslavenski film. Stil i ideologija. Zagreb: Hrvatsko filmski savez, 2011) are examined, wherein films are characterised by, respectively, a rediscovered nationalism and a sense of victimhood, or the confirmation of stereotypes of barbarism and violence. Murtic then considers the notion of ‘normalisation’ (Pavicic, Postjugoslavenski film. Stil i ideologija. Zagreb: Hrvatsko filmski savez, 2011) and its creation of an integrative space facilitating reflection on war and post-war narratives across common ground, as well as in the emergence of female directors constructing an alternative to patriarchal societies across post-Yugoslavia. Taking as its central case study, Kristian Milic’s The Living and the Dead (2007), a film which displays all the dominant characteristics of the post-Yugoslav war genre, it examines the demilitarisation of men in the context of the historical entrenchment of militaristic discourse(s) and the predominantly anti-war stance of post-Yugoslav war cinema.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In post-Yugoslav film, depictions of Roma abound in associations with inferiority and an inability to conform to cultural and social norms of the majority This projection mirrors the position of B
Abstract: In post-Yugoslav film, depictions of Roma abound in associations with inferiority and an inability to conform to cultural and social norms of the majority This projection mirrors the position of B

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
24 Jan 2018
TL;DR: Mulvey et al. as discussed by the authors proposed a vision of a cosmopolitan cinema for the future of film and screen media, and published a journal article with the title "For A Cosmopolitan Cinema".
Abstract: For a cosmopolitan cinema [Editorial] Author(s) Mulvey, James; Rascaroli, Laura; Saldanha, Humberto Publication date 2017 Original citation Mulvey, J., Rascaroli, L. and Saldanha, H. (2017) 'For a cosmopolitan cinema' [Editorial], Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, 14, pp. 1–15. Type of publication Article (non peer-reviewed) Link to publisher's version http://www.alphavillejournal.com/Issue14/Editorial.pdf Access to the full text of the published version may require a subscription. Rights © 2017, The Author(s) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Item downloaded from http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6058

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Aida Vidan1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that the recent output by a group of South Slavic female directors has created a synergy of thematic preoccupations and stylistic choices which constitute a new coherent developm...
Abstract: The article argues that the recent output by a group of South Slavic female directors has created a synergy of thematic preoccupations and stylistic choices which constitute a new coherent developm...

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss Jasmila Žbanic's Esma's Secret (Grbavica, 2006), On the Path (Na Putu, 2010) and For Those Who Can Tell No Tales (Za one koji ne mogu da govore, 2013) as a trilogy addressing the consequences of Bosnian War.
Abstract: The aim of the article is to discuss Jasmila Žbanic’s Esma’s Secret (Grbavica, 2006), On the Path (Na Putu, 2010) and For Those Who Can Tell No Tales (Za one koji ne mogu da govore, 2013) as a trilogy addressing the consequences of Bosnian War. The films are considered in the theoretical framework of women’s cinema as world cinema, exploring their location in relation to globalization. The article hence analyses each film’s aesthetic in light of influential feminist concepts and theories such as Rey Chow’s age of the world target, Adriana Cavarero’s horrorism and caring, E Ann Kaplan’s trauma and Judith Butler’s ethics. In these films the violated body is neither victimized nor considered as a natural being: each character is a biopolitical subject, geo-culturally located, and produced through processes originating from dynamics of power and responsibility, guilt and care.

2 citations