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Dominique Thévenin

Bio: Dominique Thévenin is an academic researcher from Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg. The author has contributed to research in topics: Turbulence & Premixed flame. The author has an hindex of 37, co-authored 322 publications receiving 6322 citations. Previous affiliations of Dominique Thévenin include RWTH Aachen University & Max Planck Society.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: It is shown that using FPI, the correct evolution is obtained for all species from almost unstrained flames up to flames near extinction, and the computational times are tremendously reduced with FPI in comparison with full chemistry.
Abstract: The cost of including full kinetics in realistic computations remains extremely high. This has led many researchers to develop reduction techniques for the chemistry. These methods are generally valid only in a very limited range of equivalence ratio, pressure, or temperature and require extensive human time to develop the reduced schemes. Recently, an automatic method based on intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds (ILDM) has been proposed. Because of ILDM, the reduction of detailed reaction schemes is much simuplified, leading to the fast generation of look-up tables containing the information corresponding to the reduced chemical schemes. Nevertheless, the ILDM method is not well suited to describe the low-temperature domain, since the dimension and therefore the complexity of the databases increase tremendously in this zone. In this work, we propose a new version of the ILDM method, called flame prolongation of ILDM (FPI), which enables us to solve the problem at low temperatures. We used laminar premixed free flames to extend the manifolds generated with ILDM, thus leading to smooth and accurate evolutions of the species along all the flame front. In order to demonstrate the interest of FPI, we computed the response of a premixed flame to straining using the double-premixed counterflow flame configuration. We show that using FPI, the correct evolution is obtained for all species from almost unstrained flames up to flames near extinction. The computational times are tremendously reduced with FPI in comparison with full chemistry.

538 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the boundary conditions for reactive flows described by Navier-Stokes equations are discussed. And a formulation based on one-dimensional characteristic waves relations at the boundaries, previously developed by Poinsot and Lele for perfect gases with constant homogeneous thermodynamic properties, is rewritten and extended in order to be used in the case of gases described with realistic thermodynamic and reactive models.

299 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of flame/vortex interactions with flames can be found in this article, where progress in theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations on flame/Vortex interactions is reviewed.

290 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the geometry of the blade shape (skeleton line) was optimized in the presence of the obstacle plate to increase the output power of a Savonius turbine.

263 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a three-dimensional version of the FPI model is proposed to handle heat losses in turbulent combustion simulations, which can be used to describe correctly premixed, partially premixed and diffusion combustion.
Abstract: Many models are now available to describe chemistry at a low CPU cost, but only a few of them can be used to describe correctly premixed, partially premixed and diffusion combustion. One of them is the FPI model that uses two coordinates: the mixture fraction Z and the progress variable c. In this paper, we introduce a new evolution of the FPI method that can now handle heat losses. After a short review of kinetic models used in turbulent combustion, the main features of the new three-dimensional FPI method, in which we introduce a third coordinate for enthalpy h, are presented. First, a one-dimensional radiative premixed flame validation case is presented for a large range of radiative heat losses. Second, we present the results of simulations of two laminar burners. Both the fully and the partially premixed burner simulations give a good estimation of all the flame features such as the flame stabilization (driven by heat losses), the flame structure and the profile of major and minor species.

222 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a fast Fourier transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed to discriminate between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour generation techniques.
Abstract: A fast-Fourier-transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed. By computer processing of a noncontour type of fringe pattern, automatic discrimination is achieved between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour-generation techniques. The method has advantages over moire topography and conventional fringe-contour interferometry in both accuracy and sensitivity. Unlike fringe-scanning techniques, the method is easy to apply because it uses no moving components.

3,742 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: The boundary layer equations for plane, incompressible, and steady flow are described in this paper, where the boundary layer equation for plane incompressibility is defined in terms of boundary layers.
Abstract: The boundary layer equations for plane, incompressible, and steady flow are $$\matrix{ {u{{\partial u} \over {\partial x}} + v{{\partial u} \over {\partial y}} = - {1 \over \varrho }{{\partial p} \over {\partial x}} + v{{{\partial ^2}u} \over {\partial {y^2}}},} \cr {0 = {{\partial p} \over {\partial y}},} \cr {{{\partial u} \over {\partial x}} + {{\partial v} \over {\partial y}} = 0.} \cr }$$

2,598 citations

Book
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: This updated edition includes new worked programming examples, expanded coverage and recent literature regarding incompressible flows, the Discontinuous Galerkin Method, the Lattice Boltzmann Method, higher-order spatial schemes, implicit Runge-Kutta methods and code parallelization.
Abstract: Computational Fluid Dynamics: Principles and Applications, Third Edition presents students, engineers, and scientists with all they need to gain a solid understanding of the numerical methods and principles underlying modern computation techniques in fluid dynamics By providing complete coverage of the essential knowledge required in order to write codes or understand commercial codes, the book gives the reader an overview of fundamentals and solution strategies in the early chapters before moving on to cover the details of different solution techniques This updated edition includes new worked programming examples, expanded coverage and recent literature regarding incompressible flows, the Discontinuous Galerkin Method, the Lattice Boltzmann Method, higher-order spatial schemes, implicit Runge-Kutta methods and parallelization An accompanying companion website contains the sources of 1-D and 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes flow solvers (structured and unstructured) and grid generators, along with tools for Von Neumann stability analysis of 1-D model equations and examples of various parallelization techniques Will provide you with the knowledge required to develop and understand modern flow simulation codes Features new worked programming examples and expanded coverage of incompressible flows, implicit Runge-Kutta methods and code parallelization, among other topics Includes accompanying companion website that contains the sources of 1-D and 2-D flow solvers as well as grid generators and examples of parallelization techniques

1,228 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of the advances made over the past two decades in this area is provided in this article, where various swirl injector configurations and related flow characteristics, including vortex breakdown, precessing vortex core, large-scale coherent structures, and liquid fuel atomization and spray formation are discussed.

1,048 citations

01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: Two algorithms for generating the Gaussian quadrature rule defined by the weight function when: a) the three term recurrence relation is known for the orthogonal polynomials generated by $\omega$(t), and b) the moments of the weightfunction are known or can be calculated.
Abstract: Most numerical integration techniques consist of approximating the integrand by a polynomial in a region or regions and then integrating the polynomial exactly. Often a complicated integrand can be factored into a non-negative ''weight'' function and another function better approximated by a polynomial, thus $\int_{a}^{b} g(t)dt = \int_{a}^{b} \omega (t)f(t)dt \approx \sum_{i=1}^{N} w_i f(t_i)$. Hopefully, the quadrature rule ${\{w_j, t_j\}}_{j=1}^{N}$ corresponding to the weight function $\omega$(t) is available in tabulated form, but more likely it is not. We present here two algorithms for generating the Gaussian quadrature rule defined by the weight function when: a) the three term recurrence relation is known for the orthogonal polynomials generated by $\omega$(t), and b) the moments of the weight function are known or can be calculated.

1,007 citations