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Author

Donald P. Rizzetta

Other affiliations: Air Force Research Laboratory
Bio: Donald P. Rizzetta is an academic researcher from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reynolds number & Large eddy simulation. The author has an hindex of 29, co-authored 62 publications receiving 2639 citations. Previous affiliations of Donald P. Rizzetta include Air Force Research Laboratory.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the flowflelds surrounding a synthetic-jet actuating device are investigated numerically by direct simulation, and solutions are obtained to the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations for both the interior of the actuator cavity and for the external jet flowfield.
Abstract: The flowflelds surrounding a synthetic-jet actuating device are investigated numerically by direct simulation. Solutions are obtained to the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations for both the interior of the actuator cavity and for the external jet flowfield. The interior results are generated on an overset deforming zonal mesh system, whereas the jet flowfield is obtained by a high-order compact-difference scheme. Newton-like subiterations are employed to achieve second-order temporal accuracy. Details of the computations are summarized, and the quality of the results is assessed via grid resolution and time-step size studies. Several aspects of the actuator configuration are investigated, including cavity geometry and Reynolds number. Differences between two-dimensional and three-dimensional external unsteady flowfields are elucidated, and comparison is made with experimental data in terms of the mean and fluctuating components of the jet velocity

310 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, large-eddy simulations of supersonic cavity flowfields are performed using a high-order numerical method, which employs a time-implicit approximately factored finite difference algorithm, and applies Newton-like subiterations to achieve second-order temporal and fourth-order spatial accuracy.
Abstract: Large-eddy simulations of supersonic cavity flowfields are performed using a high-order numerical method. Spatial derivatives are represented by a fourth-order compact approximation that is used in conjunction with a sixth-order nondispersive filter. The scheme employs a time-implicit approximately factored finite difference algorithm, and applies Newton-like subiterations to achieve second-order temporal and fourth-order spatial accuracy. The Smagorinsky dynamic subgrid-scale model is incorporated in the simulations to account for the spatially underresolved stresses. Computations at a freestream Mach number of 1.19 are carried out for a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 5:1. The computational domain is described by 2.06×10 7 grid points and has been partitioned into 254 zones, which were distributed on individual processors of a massively parallel computing platform. Active flow control is applied through pulsed mass injection at a very high frequency, thereby suppressing resonant acoustic oscillatory modes

202 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a high-order numerical method was proposed for large-eddy simulations, particularly those containing wall-bounded regions which are considered on stretched curvilinear meshes, where spatial derivatives are represented by a sixth-order compact approximation that is used in conjunction with a tenth-order non-dispersive filter.
Abstract: This work investigates a high-order numerical method which is suitable for performing large-eddy simulations, particularly those containing wall-bounded regions which are considered on stretched curvilinear meshes. Spatial derivatives are represented by a sixth-order compact approximation that is used in conjunction with a tenth-order non-dispersive filter. The scheme employs a time-implicit approximately factored finite-difference algorithm, and applies Newton-like subiterations to achieve second-order temporal and sixth-order spatial accuracy. Both the Smagorinsky and dynamic subgrid-scale stress models are incorporated in the computations, and are used for comparison along with simulations where no model is employed. Details of the method are summarized, and a series of classic validating computations are performed. These include the decay of compressible isotropic turbulence, turbulent channel flow, and the subsonic flow past a circular cylinder. For each of these cases, it was found that the method was robust and provided an accurate means of describing the flowfield, based upon comparisons with previous existing numerical results and experimental data. Published in 2003 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a numerical solution for the unsteady flow over a three-dimensional cavity at a freestream Mach number of 1.5 and Reynolds number 1.09 x 10 6.
Abstract: A numerical solution is presented for the unsteady flow over a three-dimensio nal cavity at a freestream Mach number of 1.5 and Reynolds number of 1.09 x 10 6. The self-sustained oscillatory motion within the cavity is generated numerically by integration of the time-dependent compressible three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Effects of fine-scale turbulence are simulated via a simple algebraic closure model. Details of the flowfield structure are elucidated, and it is verified that the fundamental behavior of the unsteady phenomena is two dimensional. Comparison with experimental data is made in terms of the mean static pressure and overall acoustic sound pressure levels within the cavity, as well as with the acoustic frequency spectra of the oscillation along the cavity floor and rear bulkhead.

155 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a numerical simulation was used to describe the subsonic flow past an array of distributed cylindrical roughness elements mounted on a flat plate, and the numerical method used a sixth-order accurate centered compact finite difference scheme to represent spatial derivatives, which was used in conjunction with a tenth-order low-pass Pade-type nondispersive filter operator to maintain stability.
Abstract: Direct numerical simulation was used to describe the subsonic flow past an array of distributed cylindrical roughness elements mounted on a flat plate. Solutions were obtained for element heights corresponding to a roughness-based Reynolds number (Re k ) of both 202 and 334. The numerical method used a sixth-order-accurate centered compact finite difference scheme to represent spatial derivatives, which was used in conjunction with a tenth-order low-pass Pade-type nondispersive filter operator to maintain stability. An implicit approximately factored time-marching algorithm was employed, and Newton-like subiterations were applied to achieve second-order temporal accuracy. Calculations were carried out on a massively parallel computing platform, using domain decomposition to distribute subzones on individual processors. A high-order overset grid approach preserved spatial accuracy on the mesh system used to represent the roughness elements. Features of the flowfields are described, and results of the computations are compared with experimentally measured velocity components of the time-mean flowfield, which are available only for Re k = 202. Flow about the elements is characterized by a system of two weak corotating horseshoe vortices. For Re k = 334, an unstable shear layer emanating from the top of the cylindrical element generated nonlinear unsteady disturbances of sufficient amplitude to produce explosive bypass transition downstream of the array. The Re k = 202 case displayed exponential growth of turbulence energy in the streamwise direction, which may eventually result in transition.

145 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: The boundary layer equations for plane, incompressible, and steady flow are described in this paper, where the boundary layer equation for plane incompressibility is defined in terms of boundary layers.
Abstract: The boundary layer equations for plane, incompressible, and steady flow are $$\matrix{ {u{{\partial u} \over {\partial x}} + v{{\partial u} \over {\partial y}} = - {1 \over \varrho }{{\partial p} \over {\partial x}} + v{{{\partial ^2}u} \over {\partial {y^2}}},} \cr {0 = {{\partial p} \over {\partial y}},} \cr {{{\partial u} \over {\partial x}} + {{\partial v} \over {\partial y}} = 0.} \cr }$$

2,598 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A particular type of plasma actuator that has gained wide use is based on a single-dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) mechanism that has desirable features for use in air at atmospheric pressures as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The term plasma actuator has now been a part of the fluid dynamics flow-control vernacular for more than a decade. A particular type of plasma actuator that has gained wide use is based on a single–dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) mechanism that has desirable features for use in air at atmospheric pressures. For these actuators, the mechanism of flow control is through a generated body-force vector field that couples with the momentum in the external flow. The body force can be derived from first principles, and the effect of plasma actuators can be easily incorporated into flow solvers so that their placement and operation can be optimized. They have been used in a wide range of internal and external flow applications. Although initially considered useful only at low speeds, plasma actuators are effective in a number of applications at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic Mach numbers, owing largely to more optimized actuator designs that were developed through better understanding and modeling of...

1,086 citations

01 Apr 1992
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors proposed a monotone integrated large eddy simulation approach, which incorporates a form of turbulence modeling applicable when the large-scale flows of interest are intrinsically time dependent, thus throwing common statistical models into question.
Abstract: Fluid dynamic turbulence is one of the most challenging computational physics problems because of the extremely wide range of time and space scales involved, the strong nonlinearity of the governing equations, and the many practical and important applications. While most linear fluid instabilities are well understood, the nonlinear interactions among them makes even the relatively simple limit of homogeneous isotropic turbulence difficult to treat physically, mathematically, and computationally. Turbulence is modeled computationally by a two-stage bootstrap process. The first stage, direct numerical simulation, attempts to resolve the relevant physical time and space scales but its application is limited to diffusive flows with a relatively small Reynolds number (Re). Using direct numerical simulation to provide a database, in turn, allows calibration of phenomenological turbulence models for engineering applications. Large eddy simulation incorporates a form of turbulence modeling applicable when the large-scale flows of interest are intrinsically time dependent, thus throwing common statistical models into question. A promising approach to large eddy simulation involves the use of high-resolution monotone computational fluid dynamics algorithms such as flux-corrected transport or the piecewise parabolic method which have intrinsic subgrid turbulence models coupled naturally to the resolved scales in the computed flow. The physical considerations underlying and evidence supporting this monotone integrated large eddy simulation approach are discussed.

849 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A hierarchy of computational approaches that range from semi-empirical schemes that estimate the noise sources using mean-flow and turbulence statistics, to high-fidelity unsteady flow simulations that resolve the sound generation process by direct application of the fundamental conservation principles is discussed in this paper.

520 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the spectral properties of Rayleigh scattering are discussed and a review of the new advances in flow field imaging that have been achieved using the new filter approaches is presented.
Abstract: Rayleigh scattering is a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of gases and is particularly useful for aiding in the understanding of complex flow fields and combustion phenomena. Although the mechanism associated with the scattering, induced electric dipole radiation, is conceptually straightforward, the features of the scattering are complex because of the anisotropy of molecules, collective scattering from many molecules and inelastic scattering associated with rotational and vibrational transitions. These effects cause the scattered signal to be depolarized and to have spectral features that reflect the pressure, temperature and internal energy states of the gas. The very small scattering cross section makes molecular Rayleigh scattering particularly susceptible to background interference. Scattering from very small particles also falls into the Rayleigh range and may dominate the scattering from molecules if the particle density is high. This particle scattering can be used to enhance flow visualization and velocity measurements, or it may be removed by spectral filtering. New approaches to spectral filtering are now being applied to both Rayleigh molecular scattering and Rayleigh particle scattering to extract quantitative information about complex gas flow fields. This paper outlines the classical properties of Rayleigh scattering and reviews some of the new advances in flow field imaging that have been achieved using the new filter approaches.

508 citations