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Dorothy H. Bracey

Bio: Dorothy H. Bracey is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Legislation. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 2 citations.
Topics: Legislation

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper trace the development of this legislation from 1914 to the present, showing how the violations involved have reflected the concerns of the government of the time, and demonstrate that even as police have been given the right to inflict harsher punishments, they have also been subjected to greater accountability and control.
Abstract: Since 1914, China has had legislation permitting the police to punish minor violations administratively, that is, without obtaining a judgment of guilt from a court; penalties include fines and short periods of detention. This article traces the development of this legislation from 1914 to the present, showing how the violations involved have reflected the concerns of the government of the time. It demonstrates that, even as police have been given the right to inflict harsher punishments, they have also been subjected to greater accountability and control.

2 citations


Cited by
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01 Jun 2011
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper discussed the drawbacks of the present police pledge and community policing practices and discussed an integrated social control model for practicing police social service work in China, and concluded that a model that integrates both informal and formal social control strategies should be adopted for providing social service to the community while China undergoes continuous reform.
Abstract: The paper is an attempt to understand police social service work in the context of community policing in China. It first describes the key philosophy underlying community policing in China. The paper explains that the mass line ideology, which demands that the police serve people wholeheartedly, is still dominant. Based on a review of historical development of police social service work, this paper points out drawbacks of the present police pledge and community policing practices and discusses an integrated social control model for practicing police social service work in China. It concludes that a model that integrates both informal and formal social control strategies should be adopted for providing social service work to the community while China undergoes continuous reform.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, the authors describes imprisonment in China and examines some of the contexts in which it can be considered, including harsh detention practices, non-jural punishments, and the death penalty.
Abstract: Despite some evidence to the contrary, imprisonment in the People's Republic of China has been characterized as generally humane and rehabilitation-oriented. Cross-cultural comparisons, however, make conclusions tenuous because prison may not have the same precise meaning across national boundaries. This paper describes imprisonment in China and attempts to examine some of the contexts in which it can be considered. Along with humane and treatment-oriented prisons, the Chinese employ a variety of interventions including harsh detention practices, nonjural punishments, and the death penalty. The frequency with which these alternatives are used makes comparisons with American prisons difficult. Understanding is also complicated by the fact that social control practices in China have been shaped by the unique combination of Confucian and socialist ideology and practice. The study of Chinese social control can provide insight into the general problems of conducting cross-cultural research.

3 citations