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Duane Quiatt

Bio: Duane Quiatt is an academic researcher from University of Colorado Denver. The author has contributed to research in topics: Reciprocal altruism & Norm (social). The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 18 publications receiving 445 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1986-Primates
TL;DR: Stone-play has been observed among the free-ranging Arashiyama B troop Japanese macaques near Kyoto, Japan since 1979 as mentioned in this paper, and the progression of this behavior is traced through three phases: transmission, tradition, and transformation.
Abstract: Stone-play, a newly innovated cultural behavior, has been observed among the free-ranging Arashiyama B troop Japanese macaques near Kyoto, Japan since 1979. Conditions in which the non-purposeful handling of stones might possibly give rise to tool behavior are discussed. The progression of this behavior is traced through three phases: transmission, tradition, and transformation. During the first two phases, through social learning, the behavior was established within the group as a regular item of their behavioral repertoire and was most frequently observed after eating provisioned grain. In the third phase, observations suggest a “faddish” shift in the practice of certain behavioral sub-types between 1984 and 1985. During this period young individuals increasingly began to carry stones away from the feeding station, mixing stone manipulation with forage-feeding activities in the forest. Observations suggest under such conditions, stone handling is likely to lead to the occasional use of stone as a tool. This conclusion probably can be applied to species other thanMacaca fuscata. Consideration of the eco-setting and social learning correlates of stone handling suggests how the instrumental use of stone might emerge from a tradition of non-instrumental manipulation.

151 citations

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TL;DR: Selective consequences of infant kidnapping and aunting-to-death are examined, and a hypothesis is suggested concerning the adaptive significance for mothering of allomothering.
Abstract: Explanations of the function of behavior directed toward young primates by conspecifc females other than the mother have emphasized variow outcomes beneficial to “aunts, I‘ mothers, infants, or some combination thereof. There is little evidence, however, that allomothering benefits mothers or infants to any signifcant degree; allomothering is selfish behavior with highly variable consequences roughly predzctable on the basis of genealogical ties between participants. Selective consequences of infant kidnapping and aunting-to-death are examined, and a hypothesis is suggested concerning the adaptive significance for mothering of allomothering. [adoption, infant-stealing, behavioral selection]

99 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Hallowell's approach permits the building of a thrid but complementary explanation based on selection for the ability to internalize others and to attend to their representations even in the absence of their prototypes.
Abstract: A. I. Hallowell tried to turn anthropology towards a sociobiology while the former field was still strongly opposed to any consideration of the evolution of human behavior. His work is of more than historical interest, however, because he stressed the evolution of the human ability to internalize social norms and evaluate self and others in terms of them. This ability is the basis of our species's trait of cultural rather than biological adaptation to diverse ecological settings. Sociobiologists have dealt with the evolution of norm acquisition under the rubric of "altruism." Insofar as adherence to norms either directly increases the fitnes of kin (kin selection) or indirectly increases the fitness of all participants (reciprocal altruism), both Hamilton and Trivers have offered explanations for adherence to social norms. Hallowell's approach permits the building of a thrid but complementary explanation based on selection for the ability to internalize others and to attend to their representations even i...

53 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Les AA argumentent en faveur de l'idee que l'apparition du langage est une manifestation du comportement d'apprentissage cognitif lie au genre Homo et a la forte pression de la selection naturelle.
Abstract: Les AA argumentent en faveur de l'idee que l'apparition du langage est une manifestation du comportement d'apprentissage cognitif lie au genre Homo et a la forte pression de la selection naturelle

26 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 1923-Nature
TL;DR: The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus as mentioned in this paper is a remarkable and strikingly original work which is published in German and English in parallel pages and it is difficult to appreciate the reason for this, seeing that the author is evidently familiar with our language and has himself carefully revised the proofs of the translation.
Abstract: 13 EADERS of Mr. Bertrand Russell's philosophical £v works know that one of his pupils before the outbreak of the war, an Austrian, Mr. Ludwig Wittgenstein, caused him to change his views in some important particulars. Curiosity can now be satisfied. The “Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus “which Mr. Ogden has included in his new library of philosophy is a remarkable and strikingly original work. It is published in German and English in parallel pages. It is difficult to appreciate the reason for this, seeing that the author is evidently familiar with our language and has himself carefully revised the proofs of the translation. Also we should have liked to have the Tractatus without Mr. Russell's Introduction, not, we hasten to add, on account of any fault or shortcoming in that introduction, which is highly appreciative and in part a defence of himself, in part explanatory of the author, but for the reason that good wine needs no bush and that Mr. Russell's bush has the unfortunate effect of dulling the palate instead of whetting the appetite. In his penultimate sentence Mr. Russell says; “To have constructed a theory of logic which is not at any point obviously wrong is to have achieved a work of extraordinary difficulty and importance.” We agree, but how uninspiring when compared with Mr. Wittgenstein's own statement of aim: “What can be said at all can be said clearly, and whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.” Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. By Ludwig Wittgenstein. (International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method.) Pp. 189. (London: Kegan Paul and Co., Ltd.; New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., Inc., 1922.) 10s. 6d. net.

1,130 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe how people download the growth of logical thinking from childhood to adolescence, but end up in malicious downloads, rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they cope with some harmful virus inside their laptop.
Abstract: Thank you for downloading the growth of logical thinking from childhood to adolescence. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look numerous times for their chosen books like this the growth of logical thinking from childhood to adolescence, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they cope with some harmful virus inside their laptop.

862 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors integrate the proximate, developmental models with the ultimate, evolutionary ones, suggesting that two developmentally different etiologies of sociopathy emerge from two different evolutionary mechanisms.
Abstract: Sociopaths are “outstanding” members of society in two senses: politically, they draw our attention because of the inordinate amount of crime they commit, and psychologically, they hold our fascination because most ofus cannot fathom the cold, detached way they repeatedly harm and manipulate others. Proximate explanations from behavior genetics, child development, personality theory, learning theory, and social psychology describe a complex interaction of genetic and physiological risk factors with demographic and micro environmental variables that predispose a portion of the population to chronic antisocial behavior. More recent, evolutionary and game theoretic models have tried to present an ultimate explanation of sociopathy as the expression of a frequency-dependent life strategy which is selected, in dynamic equilibrium, in response to certain varying environmental circumstances. This paper tries to integrate the proximate, developmental models with the ultimate, evolutionary ones, suggesting that two developmentally different etiologies of sociopathy emerge from two different evolutionary mechanisms. Social strategies for minimizing the incidence of sociopathic behavior in modern society should consider the two different etiologies and the factors that contribute to them.

855 citations