scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Elizabeth M. Belding-Royer

Other affiliations: University of California
Bio: Elizabeth M. Belding-Royer is an academic researcher from University of California, Santa Barbara. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wireless ad hoc network & Ad hoc wireless distribution service. The author has an hindex of 30, co-authored 56 publications receiving 17657 citations. Previous affiliations of Elizabeth M. Belding-Royer include University of California.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
More filters
01 Jul 2003
TL;DR: A logging instrument contains a pulsed neutron source and a pair of radiation detectors spaced along the length of the instrument to provide an indication of formation porosity which is substantially independent of the formation salinity.
Abstract: The Ad hoc On-Demand Distance Vector (AODV) routing protocol is intended for use by mobile nodes in an ad hoc network. It offers quick adaptation to dynamic link conditions, low processing and memory overhead, low network utilization, and determines unicast routes to destinations within the ad hoc network. It uses destination sequence numbers to ensure loop freedom at all times (even in the face of anomalous delivery of routing control messages), avoiding problems (such as "counting to infinity") associated with classical distance vector protocols.

11,490 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Nov 2002
TL;DR: This work details security threats against ad hoc routing protocols, specifically examining AODV and DSR, and proposes a solution to one, the managed-open scenario where no network infrastructure is pre-deployed, but a small amount of prior security coordination is expected.
Abstract: Most recent ad hoc network research has focused on providing routing services without considering security. We detail security threats against ad hoc routing protocols, specifically examining AODV and DSR. In light of these threats, we identify three different environments with distinct security requirements. We propose a solution to one, the managed-open scenario where no network infrastructure is pre-deployed, but a small amount of prior security coordination is expected. Our protocol, authenticated routing for ad hoc networks (ARAN), is based on certificates and successfully defeats all identified attacks.

1,641 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
14 Sep 2003
TL;DR: Simulation results show that the use of obstacles and pathways has a significant impact on the performance of ad hoc network protocols.
Abstract: One of the most important methods for evaluating the characteristics of ad hoc networking protocols is through the use of simulation. Simulation provides researchers with a number of significant benefits, including repeatable scenarios, isolation of parameters, and exploration of a variety of metrics. The topology and movement of the nodes in the simulation are key factors in the performance of the network protocol under study. Once the nodes have been initially distributed, the mobility model dictates the movement of the nodes within the network. Because the mobility of the nodes directly impacts the performance of the protocols, simulation results obtained with unrealistic movement models may not correctly reflect the true performance of the protocols. The majority of existing mobility models for ad hoc networks do not provide realistic movement scenarios; they are limited to random walk models without any obstacles. In this paper, we propose to create more realistic movement models through the incorporation of obstacles. These obstacles are utilized to both restrict node movement as well as wireless transmissions. In addition to the inclusion of obstacles, we construct movement paths using the Voronoi diagram of obstacle vertices. Nodes can then be randomly distributed across the paths, and can use shortest path route computations to destinations at randomly chosen obstacles. Simulation results show that the use of obstacles and pathways has a significant impact on the performance of ad hoc network protocols.

663 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Mar 2004
TL;DR: The event triggers required for AODV operation, the design possibilities and the decisions for the ad hoc on-demand distance vector routing protocol implementation, A ODV-UCSB are described.
Abstract: To date, the majority of ad hoc routing protocol research has been done using simulation only. One of the most motivating reasons to use simulation is the difficulty of creating a real implementation. In a simulator, the code is contained within a single logical component, which is clearly defined and accessible. On the other hand, creating an implementation requires use of a system with many components, including many that have little or no documentation. The implementation developer must understand not only the routing protocol, but all the system components and their complex interactions. Further, since ad hoc routing protocols are significantly different from traditional routing protocols, a new set of features must be introduced to support the routing protocol. In this paper we describe the event triggers required for AODV operation, the design possibilities and the decisions for our ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) routing protocol implementation, AODV-UCSB. This paper is meant to aid researchers in developing their own on-demand ad hoc routing protocols and assist users in determining the implementation design that best fits their needs.

488 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper describes and evaluates ARAN and shows that it is able to effectively and efficiently discover secure routes within an ad hoc network, and details how ARAN can secure routing in environments where nodes are authorized to participate but untrusted to cooperate, as well as environments where participants do not need to be authorization to participate.
Abstract: Initial work in ad hoc routing has considered only the problem of providing efficient mechanisms for finding paths in very dynamic networks, without considering security. Because of this, there are a number of attacks that can be used to manipulate the routing in an ad hoc network. In this paper, we describe these threats, specifically showing their effects on ad hoc on-demand distance vector and dynamic source routing. Our protocol, named authenticated routing for ad hoc networks (ARAN), uses public-key cryptographic mechanisms to defeat all identified attacks. We detail how ARAN can secure routing in environments where nodes are authorized to participate but untrusted to cooperate, as well as environments where participants do not need to be authorized to participate. Through both simulation and experimentation with our publicly available implementation, we characterize and evaluate ARAN and show that it is able to effectively and efficiently discover secure routes within an ad hoc network.

349 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work develops and analyzes low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH), a protocol architecture for microsensor networks that combines the ideas of energy-efficient cluster-based routing and media access together with application-specific data aggregation to achieve good performance in terms of system lifetime, latency, and application-perceived quality.
Abstract: Networking together hundreds or thousands of cheap microsensor nodes allows users to accurately monitor a remote environment by intelligently combining the data from the individual nodes. These networks require robust wireless communication protocols that are energy efficient and provide low latency. We develop and analyze low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH), a protocol architecture for microsensor networks that combines the ideas of energy-efficient cluster-based routing and media access together with application-specific data aggregation to achieve good performance in terms of system lifetime, latency, and application-perceived quality. LEACH includes a new, distributed cluster formation technique that enables self-organization of large numbers of nodes, algorithms for adapting clusters and rotating cluster head positions to evenly distribute the energy load among all the nodes, and techniques to enable distributed signal processing to save communication resources. Our results show that LEACH can improve system lifetime by an order of magnitude compared with general-purpose multihop approaches.

10,296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a detailed study on recent advances and open research issues in WMNs, followed by discussing the critical factors influencing protocol design and exploring the state-of-the-art protocols for WMNs.

4,205 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 2005
TL;DR: The three main categories explored in this paper are data-centric, hierarchical and location-based; each routing protocol is described and discussed under the appropriate category.
Abstract: Recent advances in wireless sensor networks have led to many new protocols specifically designed for sensor networks where energy awareness is an essential consideration. Most of the attention, however, has been given to the routing protocols since they might differ depending on the application and network architecture. This paper surveys recent routing protocols for sensor networks and presents a classification for the various approaches pursued. The three main categories explored in this paper are data-centric, hierarchical and location-based. Each routing protocol is described and discussed under the appropriate category. Moreover, protocols using contemporary methodologies such as network flow and quality of service modeling are also discussed. The paper concludes with open research issues. � 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

3,573 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
11 May 2003
TL;DR: This work proposes security goals for routing in sensor networks, shows how attacks against ad-hoc and peer-to-peer networks can be adapted into powerful attacks against sensors, and introduces two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks sinkholes and HELLO floods.
Abstract: We consider routing security in wireless sensor networks. Many sensor network routing protocols have been proposed, but none of them have been designed with security as a goal. We propose security goals for routing in sensor networks, show how attacks against ad-hoc and peer-to-peer networks can be adapted into powerful attacks against sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks sinkholes and HELLO floods, and analyze the security of all the major sensor network routing protocols. We describe crippling attacks against all of them and suggest countermeasures and design considerations. This is the first such analysis of secure routing in sensor networks.

2,946 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, several fundamental key aspects of underwater acoustic communications are investigated and a cross-layer approach to the integration of all communication functionalities is suggested.
Abstract: Underwater sensor nodes will find applications in oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance applications. Moreover, unmanned or autonomous underwater vehicles (UUVs, AUVs), equipped with sensors, will enable the exploration of natural undersea resources and gathering of scientific data in collaborative monitoring missions. Underwater acoustic networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Underwater networks consist of a variable number of sensors and vehicles that are deployed to perform collaborative monitoring tasks over a given area. In this paper, several fundamental key aspects of underwater acoustic communications are investigated. Different architectures for two-dimensional and three-dimensional underwater sensor networks are discussed, and the characteristics of the underwater channel are detailed. The main challenges for the development of efficient networking solutions posed by the underwater environment are detailed and a cross-layer approach to the integration of all communication functionalities is suggested. Furthermore, open research issues are discussed and possible solution approaches are outlined. � 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V.

2,864 citations