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Emar Maier

Bio: Emar Maier is an academic researcher from University of Groningen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Indirect speech & Free indirect speech. The author has an hindex of 16, co-authored 68 publications receiving 993 citations. Previous affiliations of Emar Maier include University of Amsterdam & Radboud University Nijmegen.


Papers
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Book ChapterDOI

150 citations

01 Jan 2005

89 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work argues that the interpretation of a mixed quotation in- volves the resolution of a metalinguistic presupposition, and sets up a precise grammatical framework, explicitly connecting various levels of linguistic analysis: phonological forms, categorial syntax, and a dynamic picture of the semantics–pragmatics interface.
Abstract: The phenomenon of mixed quotation exhibits clear signs of both the apparent transparency of compositional language use and the opacity of pure quotation. I argue that the interpretation of a mixed quotation in- volves the resolution of a metalinguistic presupposition. The leading idea behind my proposal is that a mixed-quoted expression, say, “has an anomalous feature”, means what x referred to with the words ‘has an anomalous feature’. To understand how this solves the paradox, I set up a precise grammatical framework, explicitly connecting various levels of linguistic analysis: phonological forms, categorial syntax, and a dynamic picture of the semantics–pragmatics interface. In this framework I formalize and evaluate a presuppositional account of mixed quotation. Finally, I address the phenomenon of unquotation and argue that it is an essential ingredient for an elegant and empirically adequate analysis of mixed quotation in natural language. http://dx.doi.org/10.3765/sp.7.7 BibTeX info

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that free indirect discourse should be analyzed as a species of direct discourse rather than indirect discourse, and apply the semantic mechanisms of mixed quotation and unquotation to offer an alternative analysis where Free indirect discourse is essentially a paraphrase of an utterance or thought, but with unquoted tenses andpronouns.
Abstract: I argue that free indirect discourse should be analyzed as a species of direct discourse rather than indirect discourse. More specifically, I argue against the emerging consensus among semanticists, who analyze it in terms of context shifting. Instead, I apply the semantic mechanisms of mixed quotation and unquotation to offer an alternative analysis where free indirect discourse is essentially a quotation of an utterance or thought, but with unquoted tenses and pronouns.

73 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the meaning of a quoted expression always changes with the context of the quoted expression, and that the context is a priori determined variable whose value is determined by the context.
Abstract: It appears that in mixed quotations like the following, the quoted expression is used and mentioned at the same time:George says Tony is his ‘bestest friend’.Most theories seek to account for this observation by assuming that mixed quotations operate at two levels of content at once. In contradistinction to such two-dimensional theories, we propose that quotation involves just a single level of content. Quotation always produces a change in meaning of the quoted expression, and if the quotation is mixed the shift is, to a first approximation at least, from α to ‘what x calls ‘α’’, where x is a variable whose value is determined by the context. We argue that quotation is generally context dependent in various ways, and that some of these ways are presuppositional in nature; we present a detailed analysis of the presuppositions in question.

70 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Barwise and Perry as discussed by the authors tackle the slippery subject of ''meaning, '' a subject that has long vexed linguists, language philosophers, and logicians, and they tackle it in this book.
Abstract: In this provocative book, Barwise and Perry tackle the slippery subject of \"meaning, \" a subject that has long vexed linguists, language philosophers, and logicians.

1,834 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1,589 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, a preliminary case for Conventional Implicatures and a logic for conventional implicatures are presented, together with a syntactic analysis of Grice's definition.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. A Preliminary Case for Conventional Implicatures 3. A Logic for Conventional Implicatures 4. Supplements 5. Expressive Content 6. The Supplement Relation: A Syntactic Analysis 7. A Look Outside Grice's Definition Appendix Bibliography

1,001 citations

01 Mar 1991

605 citations

01 May 2005
TL;DR: For instance, the authors proposed a verbal category for narrated speech events, which takes into account three events: a narrated event, a speech, and a narrated speech event, based on three types of information: see, hear, or inferred.
Abstract: るもので、もっとも普遍的なのは目撃の有無。 ・ Jakobson (1957:147) : a verbal category ‘which takes into account three events ― a narrated event, a speech, and a narrated speech event’. ・ Boas (1938:133) : ‘while for us definiteness, number, and time are obligatory aspects, we find in another language location near the speaker or somewhere else, source of information ― whether see, heard, or inferred ― as obligatory aspects’.

397 citations