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Emma Wintle

Bio: Emma Wintle is an academic researcher from University of New South Wales. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 1 citations.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
29 Nov 2020

3 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, this paper found significant differences in awareness levels and perceptions of engagement of police recruits and protective service officers toward members of minority communities, as well as the factors influencing awareness during police-citizen engagement.
Abstract: In the 21st century, policing of all citizens requires officers to have an increased awareness of minority communities. Yet in the wake of public complaints and mass demonstrations regarding police misconduct, it is clear that police bias toward minority communities often negatively influences engagement. To better understand police awareness of minority communities and how officers’ levels of awareness and perceptions of policing influence their perceptions of engagement, data were collected from police recruits and protective service officers (N = 1585) training at one of the largest police academies in Australia. The results show significant differences in awareness levels and perceptions of engagement of police recruits and protective service officers toward members of minority communities, as well as the factors influencing awareness during police–citizen engagement. These include the police recruit’s and protective service officer’s gender and sexuality, the frequency of socialization they have with diverse people, as well as the type of social interaction experienced. The results from this study offer suggestions to increase officers’ levels of awareness of minority communities, and how this may improve on-the-job performance overtime.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the effectiveness of police academy training in preparing recruits for general-duty police work is investigated. But, there is little research to determine whether Australian police academies adequately prepare recruits to conduct police work or prime recruits for the reality of policing.
Abstract: Police academy training is the foundation of police performance. In Australia, police academy programs are usually delivered internally by police officers and are underpinned by traditional policing practices and acceptable methods of response deemed suitable. There is little research, however, which determines whether Australian police academies adequately prepare recruits to conduct police work or prime recruits for the reality of policing. Analysing data collected from 46 constables working in one of the largest Australian police organisations, this research offers original insight into a previously under-research area regarding the effectiveness of police academy training in preparing recruits for general-duties police work.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a qualitative narrative research was conducted with an Australian police jurisdiction to understand the perceptions of policing practices, professional practice, learning and professionalism within the context of police professionalisation.
Abstract: Abstract This qualitative narrative research was conducted with an Australian police jurisdiction. The paper draws on practice theory to interpret the narratives of a group of traditionally trained police officers’ perceptions of policing practices, professional practice, learning and professionalism within the context of police professionalisation. Thirty-six police officers from various ranks, including senior management, participated in semi-structured interviews. Many police officers’ understanding of professional practice and learning is centred on technique, technical knowledge, image, uniform, and reputation. Our research reveals, the practices of police are embedded in the discursive practices of policing and the institutional constraints of the organisation, that maintain and perpetuate past stories contrary to the agenda to professionalise policing. The research is set in the broader context of national and international agendas driving the professionalisation of policing which sits alongside prevailing conceptions of policing as a craft or trade, learned on-the-job, and police officers as artisans.