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Eric Markusen

Bio: Eric Markusen is an academic researcher from Southwest Minnesota State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Genocide & The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 5 publications receiving 197 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines Turkish efforts to deny the Armenian genocide of 1915-17 and exposes an arrangement by which the government of Turkey has channeled funds into a supposedly objective research institute in the United States, which in turn paid the salary of a historian who served that government in its campaign to discredit scholarship on the Armen genocide.
Abstract: This article examines Turkish efforts to deny the Armenian genocide of 1915-17. Specifically, it exposes an arrangement by which the government of Turkey has channeled funds into a supposedly objective research institute in the United States, which in turn paid the salary of a historian who served that government in its campaign to discredit scholarship on the Armenian genocide. After a short review of the Armenian genocide and a range of Turkish denial efforts, three documents are reproduced in full. They include a letter that Robert Jay Lifton received from the Turkish Ambassador to the United States, and two documents that were inadvertently included with the Lifton letter—a memorandum to the Turkish Ambassador and a draft letter to Lifton for the Ambassador's signature. After a critical analysis of each document, we discuss the harmful ness of genocide denial and explore why intellectuals might engage in the denial of known genocides. The article concludes with reflections on the relationship between scholars and truth.

57 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The object of the Controversy Corner articles is not so much to present info~ation as to stimulate thought, and this series will succeed only to the extent that it stimulates not just thought, but action.

42 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this paper, a social-psychological analysis of African American and Korean American relations in Los Angeles is presented, along with a psychological-structural model of the causes of collective violence.
Abstract: Part 1 Understanding the Sources of Collective Violence: Empirical and Theoretical Work Chapter 2 A Social-Psychological Analysis of African American and Korean American Relations in Los Angeles Chapter 3 Understanding Genocidal Killing in the Former Yugoslavia: Preliminary Observations Chapter 4 The Psychology of Political Decision Making and Aboriginal Rights in Canada Chapter 5 American Genocide: The Destruction of the Black Underclass Chapter 6 Collective Violence in Prisons: Psychosocial Dimensions and Ritualistic Transformations Chapter 7 Beyond the Conceptualization of Terrorism: A Psychological-Structural Model of the Causes of This Activity Part 8 Responding to the Problem of Collective Violence Chapter 9 Predicting Collective Violence: The Psychological and Cultural Roots of Turning against Others Chapter 10 The Prospects for a Nongenocidal World: Reflections on Why There Still Can Be Hope

14 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, it is still something altogether different whether one retains a home and household goods or has been ruined by bombs; whether he sustained his suffering and losses in combat at the front, at home, or in a concentration camp, whether he was a hunted.., victim or one of those who, even though in fear, profited by the regime.
Abstract: Close relatives and friends are dead or missing. Homes lie in ruins. Property has been destroyed. With everybody experiencing trouble, severe privations and physical suffering, it is still something altogether different whether one retains a home and household goods or has been ruined by bombs; whether he sustained his suffering and losses in combat at the front, at home, or in a concentration camp; whether he was a hunted.., victim or one of those who, even though in fear, profited by the regime .... Men have come to the limits of humanity and returned home, unable to forget what really was .... The suffering differs in kind, and most people have sense only for their

408 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a behavioral view of self-control was adopted, according to which the development of self control is a molar/molecular conflict in the development behavioral patterns.
Abstract: Self-control, so important in the theory and practice of psychology, has usually been understood introspectively. This target article adopts a behavioral view of the self (as an abstract class of behavioral actions) and of self-control (as an abstract behavioral pattern dominating a particular act) according to which the development of self-control is a molar/molecular conflict in the development of behavioral patterns. This subsumes the more typical view of self-control as a now/later conflict in which an act of self-control is a choice of a larger but later reinforcer over a smaller but sooner reinforcer. If at some future time the smaller-sooner reinforcer will be more valuable than the larger-later reinforcer, self-control may be achieved through a commitment to the largerlater reinforcer prior to that point. According to some, there is a progressive internalization of commitment in the development of self-control. This presents theoretical and empirical problems. In two experiments – one with pigeons choosing between smallersooner and larger-later reinforcers, the other with adult humans choosing between short-term particular and long-term abstract reinforcers – temporal patterning of choices increased self-control.

371 citations

BookDOI
31 Dec 2019
TL;DR: Transitional justice as mentioned in this paper is an edited collection in anthropology focused directly on this issue, arguing that, however well-intentioned, transitional justice needs to more deeply grapple with the complexities of global and transnational involvements and the local on-the-ground realities with which they intersect.
Abstract: How do societies come to terms with the aftermath of genocide and mass violence, and how might the international community contribute to this process? Recently, transitional justice mechanisms such as tribunals and truth commissions have emerged as a favoured means of redress. Transitional Justice, the first edited collection in anthropology focused directly on this issue, argues that, however well-intentioned, transitional justice needs to more deeply grapple with the complexities of global and transnational involvements and the local on-the-ground realities with which they intersect. Contributors consider what justice means and how it is negotiated in different localities where transitional justice efforts are underway after genocide and mass atrocity. They address a variety of mechanisms, among them, a memorial site in Bali, truth commissions in Argentina and Chile, First Nations treaty negotiations in Canada, violent youth groups in northern Nigeria, the murder of young women in post-conflict Guatemala, and the gacaca courts in Rwanda.

271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the history of Orientalism: In the beginning 2. Islam, the West and the rest 3. Orientalism and empire 4. The American century 5. Turmoil in the field 6. After Orientalism?
Abstract: Introduction 1. In the beginning 2. Islam, the West and the rest 3. Orientalism and empire 4. The American century 5. Turmoil in the field 6. Said's Orientalism: a book and its aftermath 7. After Orientalism? Afterword.

177 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Feb 2007
Abstract: If one does not look into the abyss, one is being wishful by simply not confronting the truth about our time. … On the other hand, it is imperative that one not get stuck in the abyss. Robert Jay Lifton (1986) Introduction Listening to climate change communicators, advocates, and scientists, there is a growing frustration that politicians and the public don't pay more attention to the issue. In their attempts to ring the alarm bells more fiercely, many are tempted either to make the issue scarier or to inundate people with more information, believing that if people only understood the urgency of global warming, they would act or demand more action. When the desired response then fails to materialize, they get disappointed, yet plow ahead undeterred. Surely, if people aren't getting the message, we must give it more loudly! Yet is “not getting the message” really the problem? And is scarier and more information the answer? Almost every new story about global warming brings more bad news. In 2005 alone, people opened the morning papers to stories that warming could be far worse than previously projected, that our emissions are committing us to warming and sea-level rise for decades to centuries even if we could stop all of them point-blank, today. Increasingly urgent is the news about the rapidly accelerating melting of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice shields.

161 citations