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Eric Myron Smith

Bio: Eric Myron Smith is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Encryption & Cryptography. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 14 publications receiving 497 citations.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
26 Jun 2011
TL;DR: The Hummingbird-2 algorithm, its design and security arguments, performance analysis on both software and hardware platforms, and timing analysis in relation to the ISO 18000-6C protocol are presented.
Abstract: Hummingbird-2 is an encryption algorithm with a 128-bit secret key and a 64-bit initialization vector. Hummingbird-2 optionally produces an authentication tag for each message processed. Like it's predecessor Hummingbird-1, Hummingbird-2 has been targeted for low-end microcontrollers and for hardware implementation in lightweight devices such as RFID tags and wireless sensors. Compared to the previous version of the cipher, and in response to extensive analysis, the internal state has been increased to 128 bits and a flow of entropy from the state to the mixing function has been improved. In this paper we present the Hummingbird-2 algorithm, its design and security arguments, performance analysis on both software and hardware platforms, and timing analysis in relation to the ISO 18000-6C protocol.

155 citations

Book ChapterDOI
25 Jan 2010
TL;DR: The experimental results show that after a system initialization phase Hummingbird can achieve up to 147 and 4.7 times faster throughput for a size-optimized and a speed- Optimized implementations, respectively, when compared to the state-of-the-art ultra-lightweight block cipher PRESENT on the similar platforms.
Abstract: Due to the tight cost and constrained resources of high-volume consumer devices such as RFID tags, smart cards and wireless sensor nodes, it is desirable to employ lightweight and specialized cryptographic primitives for many security applications. Motivated by the design of the well-known Enigma machine, we present a novel ultra-lightweight cryptographic algorithm, referred to as Hummingbird, for resource-constrained devices in this paper. Hummingbird can provide the designed security with small block size and is resistant to the most common attacks such as linear and differential cryptanalysis. Furthermore, we also present efficient software implementation of Hummingbird on the 8-bit microcontroller ATmega128L from Atmel and the 16-bit microcontroller MSP430 from Texas Instruments, respectively. Our experimental results show that after a system initialization phase Hummingbird can achieve up to 147 and 4.7 times faster throughput for a size-optimized and a speed-optimized implementations, respectively, when compared to the state-of-the-art ultra-lightweight block cipher PRESENT [10] on the similar platforms.

143 citations

Patent
07 Nov 2014
TL;DR: A system for authenticating and managing the ownership of an item comprises a tagging device affixed to the item, an item information system, an owner registration and transfer system, and an authentication system receiving authentication requests and generating a response based upon the information stored in the system or a connected system as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A system for authenticating and managing the ownership of an item comprises a tagging device affixed to the item, wherein the tagging device comprises tagging device data, an item information system receiving the tagging device data and associated item data and storing the tagging device data and the item data, an owner registration and transfer system receiving owner registration data and ownership change requests and storing the ownership history, and an authentication system receiving authentication requests and generating a response based upon the information stored in the system or a connected system.

82 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2009
TL;DR: The experimental results show that after a system initialization phase Hummingbird can achieve about 58% faster throughput than the block cipher PRESENT on a 4-bit ATAM893-D microcontroller running at 16KHz, 500KHz and 2MHz, respectively.
Abstract: The Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) technology provides an extensible, flexible and secure measure against product counterfeiting. However, due to the harsh cost and power constraints of RFID tags only dedicated cryptographic engines or low-power consumption microcontrollers can be integrated into tags to implement various security mechanisms. In this contribution, we investigate efficient implementation of an ultra-lightweight cryptographic algorithm Hummingbird[5] on a zero-power 4-bit MARC4 microcontroller from Atmel and compare the performance of Hummingbird to another ultra-lightweight block cipher PRESENT [4] on the same platform. Our experimental results show that after a system initialization phase Hummingbird can achieve about 58% faster throughput than the block cipher PRESENT on a 4-bit ATAM893-D microcontroller running at 16KHz, 500KHz and 2MHz, respectively. In particular, Hummingbird can process one data block with less than 12 ms under a typical low power configuration of 4-bit microcontrollers such as an 1.8V supply voltage and a 500KHz clock frequency.

46 citations

Patent
01 Aug 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, a multistage sequence of pseudorandom permutations is proposed to achieve enhanced integrity verification through assured error propagation using a multi-stage sequence of pseudo-random permutations.
Abstract: An encryption and authentication technique that achieves enhanced integrity verification through assured error-propagation using a multistage sequence of pseudorandom permutations. The present invention generates intermediate data-dependent cryptographic variables at each stage, which are systematically combined into feedback loops. The encryption technique also generates an authentication tag without any further steps that is N times longer than the block size where N is the number of pseudorandom permutations used in the encipherment of each block. The authentication tag provides a unique mapping to the plaintext for any number of plaintext blocks that is less than or equal to N. In addition to being a stand alone encryption algorithm, the disclosed technique is applicable to any mode that uses pseudorandom permutations such as, key dependent lookup tables, S-Boxes, and block ciphers such as RC5, TEA, and AES.

26 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
28 Sep 2011
TL;DR: This work considers the resistance of ciphers, and LED in particular, to related-key attacks, and is able to derive simple yet interesting AES-like security proofs for LED regarding related- or single- key attacks.
Abstract: We present a new block cipher LED. While dedicated to compact hardware implementation, and offering the smallest silicon footprint among comparable block ciphers, the cipher has been designed to simultaneously tackle three additional goals. First, we explore the role of an ultra-light (in fact non-existent) key schedule. Second, we consider the resistance of ciphers, and LED in particular, to related-key attacks: we are able to derive simple yet interesting AES-like security proofs for LED regarding related- or single-key attacks. And third, while we provide a block cipher that is very compact in hardware, we aim to maintain a reasonable performance profile for software implementation.

848 citations

Book ChapterDOI
26 Jun 2011
TL;DR: A new family of lightweight block ciphers named KLEIN is described, which is designed for resource-constrained devices such as wireless sensors and RFID tags, and has advantage in the software performance on legacy sensor platforms, while its hardware implementation can be compact as well.
Abstract: Resource-efficient cryptographic primitives are essential for realizing both security and efficiency in embedded systems like RFID tags and sensor nodes. Among those primitives, lightweight block cipher plays a major role as a building block for security protocols. In this paper, we describe a new family of lightweight block ciphers named KLEIN, which is designed for resource-constrained devices such as wireless sensors and RFID tags. Compared to related proposals, KLEIN has advantage in the software performance on legacy sensor platforms, while its hardware implementation can be compact as well.

313 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, a new family of lightweight block ciphers named KLEIN, which is designed for resource-constrained devices such as wireless sensors and RFID tags, is presented.
Abstract: Resource-efficient cryptographic primitives become fundamental for realizing both security and efficiency in embedded systems like RFID tags and sensor nodes. Among those primitives, lightweight block cipher plays a major role as a building block for security protocols. In this paper, we describe a new family of lightweight block ciphers named KLEIN, which is designed for resource-constrained devices such as wireless sensors and RFID tags. Compared to the related proposals, KLEIN has advantage in the software performance on legacy sensor platforms, while its hardware implementation can be compact as well.

291 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Due to the careful selection of the S-box and the asymmetric design of the permutation layer, RECTANGLE achieves a very good security-performance tradeoff and achieves avery competitive software speed among the existing lightweight block ciphers due to its bit-slice style.
Abstract: In this paper, we propose a new lightweight block cipher named RECTANGLE. The main idea of the design of RECTANGLE is to allow lightweight and fast implementations using bit-slice techniques. RECTANGLE uses an SP-network. The substitution layer consists of 16 4 4 S-boxes in parallel. The permutation layer is composed of 3 rotations. As shown in this paper, RECTAN- GLE offers great performance in both hardware and software environment, which provides enough flexibility for different application scenario. The following are 3 main advantages of RECTANGLE. First, RECTANGLE is extremely hardware-friendly. For the 80-bit key version, a one-cycle-per-round parallel implementation only needs 1600 gates for a throughput of 246 Kbits/sec at 100 KHz clock and an energy efficiency of 3.0 pJ/bit. Second, RECTANGLE achieves a very competitive software speed among the existing lightweight block ciphers due to its bit-slice style. Using 128-bit SSE instruc- tions, a bit-slice implementation of RECTANGLE reaches an average encryption speed of about 3.9 cycles/byte for messages around 3000 bytes. Last, but not least, we propose new design criteria for the RECTANGLE S-box. Due to our careful selection of the S-box and the asymmetric design of the permutation layer, RECTANGLE achieves a very good security-performance tradeoff. Our extensive and deep security analysis shows that the highest number of rounds that we can attack, is 18 (out of 25).

258 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of state-of-the-art research progress in lightweight block ciphers' implementation and future research directions is presented and the energy/bit metric is designated as the most appropriate metric for energy-constrained low-resource designs.

174 citations