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Ernest Eth́e

Bio: Ernest Eth́e is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Persian & Turkish. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 23 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors report the proportion of cosmetic surgery procedures accessed by Nigerian women and determine any associations between the demographics and cosmetic procedures accessed, and conclude that liposuction was the procedure accessed by nearly all the patients (224 (91.4%) and bilateral buttock augmentation (199 (81.2%)).
Abstract: Background Little is known about the cosmetic surgery procedures sought by Nigerian women. Aim: We sought to report the proportion of cosmetic surgery procedures accessed by Nigerian women and determine any associations between the demographics and cosmetic procedures accessed. Patients and Methods A retrospective review was conducted between January 2020 and July 2021 of all cosmetic surgery procedures at a single private cosmetic surgery practice. Data were analyzed using means, Mann-Whitney U-test, chi square test, and Fisher's exact test as appropriate. The statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results Of the 392 consultations for cosmetic procedures, 245 (62.5%) patients accessed cosmetic surgery. Most were women (239 (97.6%)) and single (178 (72.7%)). The median age of the patients at surgery was 29.0 years (IQR 26-33), the median weight was 78.8 kg (IQR 71.4-88.8), and the median body mass index (BMI) was 28.1 (IQR 25.7-32.3). Liposuction was the procedure accessed by nearly all the patients (224 (91.4%)). Next to this was bilateral buttock augmentation (199 (81.2%)). Other cosmetic procedures such as tummy tuck, facial cosmetic surgery, umbilicoplasty, and labiaplasty each constituted less than three percent of the patients. The abdomen (224 (91.4%)), back (219 (89.4%)), and arms (79 (32.2%)) were the most common regions of the body sought for liposuction, while the calves (2 (0.8%)) were the least. Liposuction of the arms was associated with the BMI (p < 0.003). Conclusion Liposuction and bilateral buttock augmentation are the most common cosmetic surgery procedures accessed by this cohort of Nigerian women.

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Book ChapterDOI
05 Nov 2019
TL;DR: The authors examines the innovative panoply of views on the nature of political authority, and visions of the sultanate as its form of embodiment, and concludes that there is a strong correlation between one's perception of human nature and vision of ideal rulership.
Abstract: This chapter examines the innovative panoply of views on the nature of political authority, and visions of the sultanate as its form of embodiment. Virtually every author writing on rulership felt it necessary first to address the question of what political authority really was, its raison d'etre and status among humanity, how it was acquired or lost, the nature of the ruler and his morality, and historical models of rulership. No author doubted the consensus-confirmed view that the sultanate was the highest rank a human being could attain, but they took divergent paths in defining its nature, scope, and entangled boundaries. A common attitude was to reconcile between various historical and theoretical models of political authority including philosopher-kingship, prophethood, and imamate by defining them in ways compatible with their own visions of rulership. Elaborating on a particular vision of rulership almost always involved an explanation of human nature, human beings' existential status, and the purpose of life. There is a strong correlation between one's perception of human nature and vision of ideal rulership.

39 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Lamici was an Ottoman Turkish poet, prose writer, and thinker of the same caliber as the great Chaghatay Turkish poet Mir cAli Shir Neva'i (d. 906/1501).
Abstract: M AHMUD bin cOsman bin Naqqdsh CAll bin ilyds (878/1472-938/1532) is a sixteenth century Turkish literary figure known by the pseudonym of LdmiCi whose works in prose and verse have won him a well-deserved fame in both areas. Born in Bursa where he received a good medrese education, he devoted all 60 years of his life to his works and died in the city of his birth.1 Unfortunately, no serious study of this highly prolific author has so far been undertaken. Only five of his many works have been published, and these publications have little scholarly value. Lamici was an Ottoman Turkish poet, prose writer, and thinker of the same caliber as the great Chaghatay Turkish poet, Mir cAli Shir Neva'i (d. 906/1501) and was versed in Iranian culture and literature; he introduced into Turkish literature Persian works of diverse literary forms, hitherto unknown to Turkish poets. Particularly interested in the works of CAbd al-Rahman Jami (d. 898/1492), Ldmici not only adapted them into Turkish but always added something of his own to his adaptations, thus, indeed, creating new works. Consequently he gained the title of Jdmi-i Ruim or Jami of Anatolia.2 In his religious thought, also, Lamic was influenced by Jami as well as Neva'I and joined the mystic order of the Naqshbandiyya.3 Having chosen the mystic path, Lamici preferred a life of seclusion and, living as a hermit, he devoted his entire being to this path and realized the precepts of the Naqshbandi order both in his life and in his works.4 Lamici belonged to a family which was eminent in the fine arts. His grandfather, Naqqdsh cAli was a well-known artist of the fifteenth century. A young man at the time

21 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2001
Abstract: Starting from the premise that maps are essentially about visualizing space, this dissertation examines what the Ottoman maps of Istanbul reveal about the city's perception, as it evolved in connection to urban development after the conquest. The maps that form the subject of this study appear as illustrations in three manuscript books. The Istanbul maps contained in Mecmu'-i Menazil (1537-8) and HUnername (1584) respectively mark the beginning and the accomplishment of the city's architectural elaboration. The other twenty maps, featuring in manuscript copies of KitAb-i Bahriye (1520s), roughly span the period between 1550 and 1700. The variants of a design fixed around 1570 offer an image that fulfills its topographic elaboration in the late-seventeenth century. While the making of this map's design relates to Istanbul's sixteenth century urban development, its topographical elaboration reflects a new perception of the city. These picture-maps, produced in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, form a unique group of documents as the only known Ottoman pictorial representations showing the city as a whole. As revealed by the context of the books containing them, their making relates both to Ottoman Empire's territorial expansion and to the appropriation of Constantinople as its new capital. Their cartographic language combines, in different manners, the familiar conventions of Islamic miniature painting with artistic forms encountered and assimilated during territorial expansion, particularly in contact with Venice. Especially the making of the Istanbul maps in Kitib-i Bahriye copies illustrates the crucial role of the Mediterranean seafaring culture, its navigation manuals, nautical charts and island books. These images of Istanbul can be related to the development of the urban landscape and its symbolic function. Their study as cartographic representations pays attention to both accuracy and emphasis in their topographic contents. Supported by contemporary European visual sources and travel accounts as well as Ottoman topographic and poetic descriptions of Istanbul, the viewing directions, the depictions of buildings, and the overall cartographic composition in these maps are interpreted as features shaping a symbolic landscape that developed from an ideal vision to an actual garden-like urban environment, structured by land, water, and architecture. Thesis Supervisor: Stanford Anderson Title: Professor of History and Architecture

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a contextual analysis of the assassination attempt on the Timurid ruler Shhrukh's life on 21 February 1427 in Herat, and demonstrate that the interrogations of those intellectuals who practiced the science of letters predated the attempted murder.
Abstract: This article provides a contextual analysis of the assassination attempt on the Timurid ruler Shāhrukh's life on 21 February 1427 in Herat. According to the contemporary Timurid chroniclers, Aḥmad-i Lur, a Ḥurūfī by profession, tried to kill Shāhrukh. Having survived the attack with light injuries, Shāhrukh reacted harshly and executed many of those who were accused of conspiring against him. During the interrogations, many other intellectuals who professed as a method of inquiry the ‘ilm-i ḥurūf (the science of letters) were also accused of participating in the conspiracy. In this article, I treat the assassination attempt as a moment of crisis in Timurid politics, study it in relation to the transformation of the intellectual landscape towards the mid-fifteenth century, and provide an in-depth textual and contextual analysis of the historiographical sources as well as the writings of those intellectuals who left a first-hand testimony of the subsequent interrogations. After a close scrutiny of the available evidence, I demonstrate that the interrogations of those intellectuals who practiced the science of letters predated the assassination attempt, and I argue that the assassination attempt was just an episode, albeit an important one, in Shāhrukh's attempts to control and regulate the emerging public sphere in Iran and Central Asia.

17 citations