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Author

Fabian Schuppert

Other affiliations: University of Zurich
Bio: Fabian Schuppert is an academic researcher from Queen's University Belfast. The author has contributed to research in topics: Economic Justice & Social equality. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 36 publications receiving 301 citations. Previous affiliations of Fabian Schuppert include University of Zurich.

Papers
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BookDOI
15 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a collection of ten original essays which present new analyses of social and relational equality in philosophy and political theory, and analyze the nature of social equality and its relationship with justice and with politics.
Abstract: This volume brings together a collection of ten original essays which present new analyses of social and relational equality in philosophy and political theory. The essays analyze the nature of social equality, and its relationship with justice and with politics. Is equality valuable? This question dominates many discussions of social justice. These discussions tend to center on whether certain forms of distributive equality are valuable, such as the equal distribution of primary social goods. They tend to neglect what is known as social or relational equality. Social egalitarians often argue that this form of equality is a more fundamental notion of equality than distributive equality. Rather than being primarily about distribution, equality, they claim, is foremost about relationships and interactions between people. When we appeal to the value of equality, we primarily mean the value of egalitarian and non-hierarchical relationships, and not of distributions. The ideal of social equality features heavily in the history of the development of equality as an important part of political theory, and a number of contemporary philosophers have written about the significance of this form of equality. It has also played an important role in real-life egalitarian movements. However, as it has been relatively neglected – it requires much more theoretical attention. This collection is an attempt to help to redress this neglect by providing in-depth analyses on the nature and distinctiveness of socially egalitarian relationships.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors sketch the contours of an alternative resource governance scheme built around the idea of an International Court of the Environment and show that states do not require full control over all resources found in their territory in order to be sovereign.
Abstract: The national resource privilege, which holds that states are allowed to control all the natural resources found in their territory, is a cornerstone of international politics. Supporters of the national resource privilege claim that without the privilege states would fail to be sovereign and self-determining entities which provide for the needs of their citizens. However, as this paper shows the case is not as simple as that. In fact, control over resources must be carefully unpacked. Doing so shows that states do not require full control over all resources found in their territory in order to be sovereign. Moreover, sovereignty and self-determination come with a set of responsibilities and duties attached. Based on these observations the paper will sketch the contours of an alternative resource governance scheme built around the idea of an International Court of the Environment.

51 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, three competing conceptions for allocating and distributing the burdens of climate change mitigation (cap-and-trade schemes, carbon emission taxes, and personal ecological space quotas) and their compatibility with principles of intra-and intergenerational justice are analysed and evaluated.
Abstract: Existing climate change mitigation policies are particularly concerned with the reconciliation of two seemingly conflicting aims: environmental protection and economic efficiency. The normative principles underlying these policies meanwhile focus on two central ideas: fair burden-sharing and agents' responsibility. However, both existing policy instruments and their supporting philosophical principles are highly problematic in terms of intergenerational justice and truly effective climate change mitigation. Three competing conceptions for allocating and distributing the burdens of climate change mitigation (cap-and-trade schemes, carbon emission taxes, and personal ecological space quotas) and their compatibility with principles of intra- and intergenerational justice are analysed and evaluated. None of the proposed instruments is able to satisfy the demands of effective mitigation and egalitarian justice on its own, which suggests that existing proposals for the distribution of emission rights and climat...

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the nature and scope of needs by analysing existing conceptualizations of the idea of needs, and argue for the concept of a fundamental interest in free social agency, which is much better suited than the basic needs actually to ground a theory of social justice, as it highlights the social and institutional conditions for free agency.
Abstract: Need-claims are ubiquitous within moral and political theory. However, need-based theories are often criticized for being too narrow in scope and too focused on the material preconditions for leading a decent life for grounding a substantial theory of social justice. The aim of this paper is threefold. Firstly, it will investigate the nature and scope of needs by analysing existing conceptualizations of the idea of needs. In so doing, we will get a better understanding of needs, which will help us to carve out the importance and singularity of basic need claims. Secondly, on the basis of the analysis of needs, it will argue for the concept of a fundamental interest in free social agency, which is much better suited than the idea of basic needs actually to ground a theory of social justice, as it highlights the social and institutional conditions for free agency. Thirdly, using the distinction between basic needs and fundamental interests, it will clarify their respective role in and importance for groundi...

35 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: However, a closer analysis of Pettit's account of "expressive egalitarianism" and recent theories of social equality shows that republican non-domination is not sufficient for securing (republican) social equality as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The republican ideal of freedom as non-domination stresses the importance of certain social relationships for a person’s freedom, showing that freedom is a social-relational state While the idea of non-domination receives a lot of attention in the literature, republican theorists say surprisingly little about equality My aim in this paper is therefore to carve out the contours of a republican conception of equality In so doing, I argue that republican accounts of equality share a significant normative overlap with the idea of ‘social equality’ However, closer analysis of Philip Pettit’s account of ‘expressive egalitarianism’ (which he sees as inherently connected to non-domination) and recent theories of social equality shows that republican non-domination – in contrast to what Pettit seems to claim – is not sufficient for securing (republican) social equality In order to secure social equality for all, republicans would have to go beyond the ideal of freedom as non-domination

20 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
G. W. Smith1

1,991 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000

1,762 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The idea of speculative reason has been used to resist the moral concept of freedom of choice for a long time as discussed by the authors, and to attack the moral concepts of freedom and, if possible, render it suspect.

1,142 citations